Artist picture of The Undertones

The Undertones

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Teenage Kicks The Undertones 02:24
My Perfect Cousin The Undertones 02:35
Here Comes the Summer The Undertones 01:45
Jimmy Jimmy The Undertones 02:41
You've Got My Number (Why Don't You Use It!) The Undertones 02:37
It's Going to Happen! The Undertones 03:32
My Perfect Cousin The Undertones 02:36
Wednesday Week The Undertones 02:14
Julie Ocean The Undertones 01:46
Get Over You The Undertones 02:45

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Biography

Famed for one of the classic hits of the punk era - the irresistible youth anthem Teenage Kicks - The Undertones must also rank as one of the best bands ever from Northern Ireland. Five friends from Creggan and the Bogside, they originally started as a covers band but the emergence of the Sex Pistols inspired them to adopt a frantic three-chord style and write their own songs. These included Teenage Kicks, written by guitarist John O'Neill and breathlessly sung by Feargal Sharkey, which provided their breakthrough when Radio 1 DJ John Peel offered to pay for a recording session. Teenage Kicks first appeared on their debut EP in 1978 and famously became Peel's all-time favourite song and was played at his funeral. It won them a major label contract, resulting in their self-titled debut album in 1979 and more jangly hit songs about adolescence like Jimmy Jimmy, Here Comes The Summer and You've Got My Number (Why Don't You Use It?). Second album Hypnotised came out in 1980, including another big hit My Perfect Cousin, but third album Positive Touch was more grown-up, including songs about The Troubles in Northern Ireland. Internal friction resulted in their split in 1983, but the band reformed in 1999 with Paul McLoone replacing singer Feargal Sharkey, who was by then (and still is) an influential record industry figure.