Show cover of The Audio Long Read

The Audio Long Read

The Audio Long Read podcast is a selection of the  Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more

Tracks

Schedule Changes to the Audio Long Read
For the month of February, we’ll be making a slight change to our production schedule. For the next few weeks, we will be publishing two episodes a week. On Mondays you’ll hear brand new long reads, and on Fridays we’ll raid the Audio Long Read archive to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. In March we’ll return to publishing three episodes a week.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
01:06 01/02/2023
‘If you win the popular imagination, you change the game’: why we need new stories on climate
So much is happening, both wonderful and terrible – and it matters how we tell it. We can’t erase the bad news, but to ignore the good is the route to indifference or despair. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
37:38 30/01/2023
‘We can’t even get basic care done’: what it’s like doing 12-hour shifts on an understaffed NHS ward
The NHS saved my life once, and inspired me to change career. But when I started as a healthcare assistant on a hospital ward for older patients, it was clear how bad things had got. This is the story of a typical shift. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
26:28 27/01/2023
From the archive – The selling of the Krays: how two mediocre criminals created their own legend
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors This week, from 2015: The Kray twins wanted everyone to know who they were – and indeed they were always better at fame than crime. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
40:22 25/01/2023
‘It was a set-up, we were fooled’: the coalmine that ate an Indian village
In a pristine forest in central India, the multibillion-dollar mining giant Adani has razed trees – and homes – to dig more coal. How does this kind of destruction get the go-ahead?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
41:01 23/01/2023
The price of ‘sugar free’: are sweeteners as harmless as we thought?
We know we need to cut down on sugar. But replacing it with artificial compounds isn’t necessarily the answer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
35:12 20/01/2023
From the archive: El Chapo: what the rise and fall of the kingpin reveals about the war on drugs
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2019: As the capture and conviction of Mexico’s notorious drug lord has shown, taking down the boss doesn’t mean taking down the organisation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
45:10 18/01/2023
Dismantling Sellafield: the epic task of shutting down a nuclear site
Nothing is produced at Sellafield any more. But making safe what is left behind is an almost unimaginably expensive and complex task that requires us to think not on a human timescale, but a planetary one. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
44:02 16/01/2023
Becoming a chatbot: my life as a real estate AI’s human backup
For one weird year, I was the human who stepped in to make sure a property chatbot didn’t blow its cover – I was a person pretending to be a computer pretending to be a person. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
39:33 13/01/2023
From the archive: Who killed the prime minister? The unsolved murder that still haunts Sweden
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2019: Three decades ago, Olof Palme was assassinated on Stockholm’s busiest street. The killer has never been found. Could the discovery of new evidence finally close the case?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
37:26 11/01/2023
‘The Godfather, Saudi-style’: inside the palace coup that brought MBS to power
Not long ago, Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Mohammed bin Nayef, was all set to assume power. But his ambitious young cousin had a ruthless plan to seize control for himself. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
34:03 09/01/2023
‘They want toys to get their children into Harvard’: have we been getting playthings all wrong?
For decades we’ve been using toys to cram learning into playtime – and toys have been marketed as tools to turn children into prosperous, high-achieving adults. Is it time for a rethink?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
38:18 06/01/2023
From the archive: How the ‘rugby rape trial’ divided Ireland
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2018: After a trial that dominated the news, the accused were all found not guilty. But the case had tapped into a deeper rage that has not died down. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
46:48 04/01/2023
Iran’s moment of truth: what will it take for the people to topple the regime?
Three months after the uprising began, demonstrators are still risking their lives. Will this generation succeed where previous attempts to unseat the Islamic hardliners have been crushed?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
40:42 02/01/2023
Best of 2022: ‘Is this justice?’: why Sudan is facing a multibillion-dollar bill for 9/11
Every Monday and Friday for the rest of December we will publish some of our favourite audio long reads of 2022, in case you missed them, with an introduction from the editorial team to explain why we’ve chosen it. From September: The families of some 9/11 victims are still pursuing compensation from those complicit in the attacks – but is Sudan, already ravaged by years of US sanctions, really the right target?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
42:10 30/12/2022
Best of 2022: The amazing true(ish) story of the ‘Honduran Maradona’
Every Monday and Friday for the rest of December we will publish some of our favourite audio long reads of 2022, in case you missed them, with an introduction from the editorial team to explain why we’ve chosen it. This week, from October: For one of our many adolescent pranks, my friend and I planted tips about an obscure young footballer. Then he suddenly started going places. What had we done?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
31:20 26/12/2022
Best of 2022: ‘Parents are frightened for themselves and for their children’: an inspirational school in impossible times
Every Monday and Friday for the rest of December we will publish some of our favourite audio long reads of 2022, in case you missed them, with an introduction from the editorial team to explain why we’ve chosen it. From September: Austerity, the pandemic and now the cost of living crisis have left many schools in a parlous state. How hard do staff have to work to give kids the chances they deserve?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
44:20 23/12/2022
Best of 2022: The sludge king: how one man turned an industrial wasteland into his own El Dorado
Every Monday and Friday for the rest of December we will publish some of our favourite audio long reads of 2022, in case you missed them, with an introduction from the editorial team to explain why we’ve chosen it. From September: When a Romanian businessman returned to his hometown and found a city blighted by mining waste, he hatched a plan to restore it to its former glory. He became a local hero, but now prosecutors accuse of him a running a multimillion dollar fraud. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
51:44 19/12/2022
Best of 2022: ‘A deranged pyroscape’: how fires across the world have grown weirder
Every Monday and Friday for the rest of December we will publish some of our favourite audio long reads of 2022, in case you missed them, with an introduction from the editorial team to explain why we’ve chosen it. From February: Despite the rise of headline-grabbing megafires, fewer fires are burning worldwide now than at any time since antiquity. But this isn’t good news – in banishing fire from sight, we have made its dangers stranger and less predictable. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
39:25 16/12/2022
Best of 2022: Seven stowaways and a hijacked oil tanker: the strange case of the Nave Andromeda
Every Monday and Friday for the rest of December we will publish some of our favourite audio long reads of 2022, in case you missed them, with an introduction from the editorial team to explain why we’ve chosen it. From July: In October 2020, an emergency call was received from a ship in British waters. After a full-scale commando raid, seven Nigerians were taken off in handcuffs – but no one was ever charged. What really happened on board?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
46:21 12/12/2022
The many meanings of moss
Moss is ancient, and grows at a glacial pace, but it lives alongside us everywhere, country and city, a witness to the human world and its catastrophic speed. What can we learn by tuning in to ‘moss time’?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
33:22 09/12/2022
From the archive: Dulwich Hamlet: the tiny football club that lost its home to developers – and won it back
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors This week, from 2018: After they were locked out of their own stadium, an unlikely band of supporters came together to save a beloved south London club. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
50:00 07/12/2022
‘He was fast … he ran you right over’: what it’s like to get hit by an SUV
One Thursday afternoon, I stepped out to cross a city street – and woke up in hospital with broken bones and a brain injury. After I recovered, I started looking into why so many drivers just don’t stop. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
30:46 05/12/2022
How to move a country: Fiji’s radical plan to escape rising sea levels
In Fiji, the climate crisis means dozens of villages could soon be underwater. Relocating so many communities is an epic undertaking. But now there is a plan – and the rest of the world is watching. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
34:11 02/12/2022
From the archive: China’s hi-tech war on its Muslim minority
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors This week, from 2019: Smartphones and the internet gave the Uighurs a sense of their own identity – but now the Chinese state is using technology to strip them of it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
31:47 30/11/2022
‘Who remembers proper binmen?’ The nostalgia memes that help explain Britain today
Idealising the past is nothing new, but there is something peculiarly revealing about the way a certain generation of Facebook users look back fondly on tougher times. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
34:46 28/11/2022
Are we really prisoners of geography?
A wave of bestselling authors claim that global affairs are still ultimately governed by the immutable facts of geography – mountains, oceans, rivers, resources. But the world has changed more than they realise. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
39:51 25/11/2022
From the archive: How I let drinking take over my life
We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors This week, from 2018: Five years after his last taste of alcohol, William Leith tries to understand its powerful magic. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
30:38 23/11/2022
The night everything changed: waiting for Russia’s invasion of Ukraine
Despite all the warning signs, as I sat down for dinner with friends in Kyiv on 23 February, war seemed unreal. Surely, Putin was bluffing?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
32:46 21/11/2022
Megalopolis: how coastal west Africa will shape the coming century
By the end of the century, Africa will be home to 40% of the world’s population – and nowhere is this breakneck-pace development happening faster than this 600-mile stretch between Abidjan and Lagos. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod
33:12 18/11/2022