Show cover of Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

Tracks

Dr Rosemary Coogan, Contraceptive Pill, Failing the 11+
Dr Rosemary Coogan has been selected as a career astronaut by the European Space Agency (ESA), becoming the first British woman to join their astronaut corps. She joins Emma in her first in-depth BBC interview to discuss the tough selection process, upcoming training and hopes for her first mission. On Monday’s Woman’s Hour, we heard from the American TV show host Ricki Lake who has produced a new documentary The Business of Birth Control. The programme looks at the side effects of the hormonal contraceptive pill and it’s relationship with women’s liberty. Today Emma Barnett is joined by Dr Helen Munro, the Vice-President of the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare. A cross-party coalition is launching a campaign to abolish the 11 plus entry exams. One of the members of the campaign is Jackie Malton, known for her success in the Metropolitan Police, and for being the real-life inspiration for the character DCI Jane Tennison in Prime Suspect. Despite getting two masters degrees and a doctorate, she still feels ashamed about failing her 11 plus exam. Jackie joins Emma Barnett. We hear the first major speech from Camilla, Queen Consort, as she hosts a reception on violence against women and girls. A listener we are calling Christina contacted us after she heard a recent documentary on Radio 4 about benzodiazepines or Street Valium. Christina recognised what she heard. Her daughter, who we are calling Beatrice, became addicted to Xanax after taking it to deal with the extreme anxiety she experienced after the coronavirus lockdown. Beatrice has given us permission for her story to be told. Christina joins Emma Barnett to discuss her experiences. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce (photo credit: ESA - P. Sebirot)
57:34 30/11/22
Part-time work, sexual violence in conflict, graphic novel No Surrender
Today is day two of an international conference held here in the UK to prevent sexual violence in conflict and Emma Barnett will be talking to Lord Ahmad, who’s the Prime Minister’s special Envoy on this issue. It’s ten years since the conference began and Woman’s Hour will be looking at what progress has been made to date as well as hearing the testimony of Lejla Damon who was born after her mother was raped in the Bosnian conflict of the 1990s. Adopted by a British couple, she is now a campaigner raising awareness about rape as a weapon of war and the fallout for victims. 600,000 people in the UK are actively seeking jobs with part-time hours, most of them women – but just twelve percent of jobs advertised in the UK currently offer part-time hours. Those that do are mostly for low paid jobs. That’s according to new research from social enterprise & flexible working experts Timewise. Emma will be speaking to the co-founder of Timewise, Emma Stewart MBE about the impact this is having on both living standards and businesses as well as hearing from one highly successful working mum who’s desperate for more part time work whilst recovering from bone cancer, but has found it impossible to find anything that reflects her impressive skillset. Sisters Sophie and Scarlett Rickard have brought the suffragette story to life in a new graphic novel called No Surrender. Based on the 1911 novel by the real life suffragette Constance Maud, they hope to make it accessible to a modern audience in a time when protest, and modes of protest, are being debated more than ever in the UK. They tell Emma about their creative process, being women in the world of comics, and living with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
57:14 29/11/22
Ricki Lake talks about latest project. Sexual abuse in the navy. China protests. Camilla's Squad.
Ricki Lake is widely known for her American talk show in the '90s and early 2000s. She's an actor and a producer as well as an independent filmmaker. Emma talks to her about her role as Executive Producer, on a new documentary "The Business of Birth Control" which looks at the complex relationship between hormonal birth control and women's health and liberation. The head of the Royal Navy has defended the way the service handles allegations of rape and sexual abuse. Admiral Sir Ben Key says the Navy had changed how it investigates complaints. His defence follows a very memorable interview earlier this month with a woman we called 'Catherine' . She called for the complaints process to be made independent of the Royal Navy. He gave his response on yesterday's Broadcasting House. Over the weekend we learned that Camilla, the Queen Consort, has created a squad of her own. Rather than opting for ladies-in-waiting, she will instead be helped by "Queen's companions". Camilla has picked six of her closest friends and their role will include helping her at public events. We hear from journalist Claire Cohen, author of 'BFF? The Truth about Female Friendship.' Extraordinary protests in China grew over the weekend as people in cities across the country demonstrate their frustration at President Xi Jinping’s zero-covid approach, with some people calling for him to resign. Noticeable among these protestors are the numbers of young women, being called the ‘prominent voices’ of the action. Yuan Ren is a Chinese journalist and former editor of Time Out Beijing, and Isabel Hilton is the founder of China Dialogue, a non-profit independent organisation that works to promote an understanding of China's challenges,. Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell
57:37 28/11/22
Weekend Woman’s Hour: stalking, long-term relationships and why they fail, women boxers, the clitoris, Andrea Riseborough
To mark ten years since stalking became a specific crime in England and Wales, we speak to crime reporter and presenter Isla Traquair. In her day job Isla is used to confronting murderers and travelling to dangerous places but it was in a quiet village in Wiltshire where her stalking ordeal took place. In August this year Isla's neighbour, Jonathan Barrett, was found guilty of stalking. This followed what Isla calls a 7 month period of terror from March to September 2021. 99% of all boxers are men and it remains a male dominated sport in all areas. We speak to Susannah Schofield OBE who hopes to harness the growing appetite for women’s sport with the recent successes of women’s football and rugby by convincing the BBC to show women's boxing. New research shows the clitoris actually has over 10,000 nerve endings. 20% more than the previously suggested amount from studies on cows in the 1970s. Does this increase in number matter? We ask science journalist Rachel E Gross and Dr Brooke Vandermolen, an NHS Obstetrics and Gynaecology Registrar. Why is it that we so often struggle or fail in long term relationships? We’re talking instead about unremarkable everyday behaviours that help to end a marriage. We speak to couples therapist, Joanna Harrison and relationship coach, Matthew Fray. The actor Andrea Riseborough tells us about playing Mrs Wormwood in the new Matilda the Musical film. The film is an adaptation of Tim Minchin’s hit West End musical of the same name. It stars Emma Thompson as Mrs Trunchbull, Lashana Lynch as Miss Honey and Stephen Graham as Mr Wormwood. She talks about playing one of Roald Dahl’s most famous characters and her life off camera, meeting Patti Smith for the first time. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Surya Elango Editor: Emma Pearce
56:39 26/11/22
Women Boxers, Naming Sexual Predators, Fathers & Daughters, Sexual Health over 65
The comedian Katherine Ryan has been in the news this week after she spoke out on a recent documentary with Louis Theroux about confronting an alleged sexual predator while making a tv show. She says this ‘star’ has sexually assaulted women she knows and despite it being an ‘open secret’ in the industry no one has managed to nail him down because he has ‘very good lawyers’. In the documentary she refuses to name the alleged sexual predator and then was called out on this on social media. But what is there to gain for women who name sexual predators in this way? Comedian Grace Campbell and Psychologist Dr Holi Rubin discuss the complexities of father and daughter relationships with Anita off the back of a new film Aftersun. It stars Paul Mescal, is directed by Charlotte Wells and has been applauded for the way it presents the bond between a father and daughter. Last month women’s boxing made history when Claressa Shields and Savannah Marshall fought in front of a sell-out crowd at the 02 arena to become the World Middleweight Champion. Not only was it the first-ever all female card in the UK but also the first time that two female boxers headlined at a major British venue. Despite this these developments 99% of all boxers are men and it remains a male dominated sport in all areas. One woman trying to change this is Susannah Schofield OBE. With her longstanding career in business and coaching she is using her knowledge, skills, and experience to ensure that women boxers get the same opportunities as their male counterparts, through her organisation championing female boxers. She hopes to harness the growing appetite for women’s sport with the recent successes of women’s football and rugby by convincing the BBC to show women's boxing. A recent report by the Local Government Association said “the largest proportional increase in gonorrhoea and chlamydia was seen in people aged over 65” leading up to the pandemic. But why are older people so often left out of the conversation about sexual health? Anita Rani is joined by Elaine Kingett, 70, who found herself widowed and having to buy condoms for the first time in her 50s and Professor Kaye Wellings, who is currently working on the next action plan on older adults and sexual health for the government. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Harriet Johnson Interviewed Guest: Polly Vernon Interviewed Guest: Grace Campbell Interviewed Guest: Dr Holi Rubin Interviewed Guest: Susannah Schofield Interviewed Guest: Elaine Kingett Interviewed Guest: Prof Kaye Wellings
56:43 25/11/22
Lady Glenconner, Ukraine, Clever girls, The Clitoris
Lady Glenconner, Anne Tennant, the eldest child of the fifth Earl of Leicester, was lady-in-waiting to Princess Margaret for three decades. She says her mother brought her up to cope with a fundamental truth of her class and time: women must put up and shut up, and so had been taught to smile through life in high society despite the brutality of a husband who left her deaf in one ear. After the success of her first memoir three years ago a second has just been published. Joining Emma live in the studio she explains why she was compelled to write Whatever Next? Lessons From An Unexpected Life. President Zelensky has accused Russia of "crimes against humanity" after a new missile barrage caused blackouts across Ukraine. Yesterday we heard of a two day old baby dying when a maternity unit was bombed in the southern Zaporizhia region. How are these developments affecting women and girls? Emma hears from Jess Parker, BBC Correspondent in Ukraine at the moment. This Saturday, the Ukrainian Institute in London, alongside other organisations, have organised an event to discuss sexual violence in the war in Ukraine. Emma talks to one of the speakers, Anna Kvit, a research fellow at University College London looking into women in war and their response to war. With the release of Matilda the Musical in cinemas this week, Emma Barnett speaks to author and podcaster Daisy Buchanan and QI Elf and writer Anne Miller about being so-called 'girly swots' at school and how it has shaped them in adulthood. You may have heard that the clitoris has 8,000 nerve endings, but that number comes from a 1970s study on cows. New research shows the clitoris actually has over 10,000 nerve endings. Does this increase in number matter? Emma asks science journalist Rachel E Gross and Dr Brooke Vandermolen, an NHS Obstetrics and Gynaecology Registrar.
59:09 24/11/22
Long-term relationships and why they fail, football and politics, Brain of Britain, Susan Seidelman
Some may say that football and politics don't go together but anyone watching yesterday's matches might think otherwise. The Iranian team declined to sing their anthem & Wales fans showed their support for LGBTQ+ rights last night by wearing rainbow bucket hats. So how useful are these shows of solidarity? Laura McAllister, the ex-Wales footballer & Beth Fisher, freelance sports reporter & ambassador for the LGBTQ+ charity Stonewall discuss. Why is it that we so often struggle or fail in long term relationships? We’re not talking about major marriage infractions such as infidelity, domestic abuse or gambling away the family’s savings. We’re talking instead about unremarkable everyday behaviours that help to end a marriage. Guests are Joanna Harrison, author of Five Arguments All Couples (Need to) Have and why the washing up matters and Matthew Fray, author of This is how your marriage ends: A hopeful approach to saving relationships. Yesterday Radio 4’s Brain of Britain saw its first ever all-women final. 2022 champion Sarah Trevarthen joins Emma Barnett to discuss her victory, as well as her experiences undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer while taking part in the show. Becky Howell, the co-founder of feminist quiz zine Quizogyny, also joins us to talk about the rise of women in quizzing. Susan Seidelman is an American film director, whose ground-breaking feature film Desperately Seeking Susan is considered one of the 100 greatest films directed by a woman. Susan joins Emma to discuss why the film is still relevant today, how she witnessed Madonna’s rise to success and her long career as a female director. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
58:15 24/11/22
Andrea Riseborough, Egg Freezing, Women in Qatar
The actor Andrea Riseborough has taken on roles ranging from Margaret Thatcher to Stalin’s daughter. But now she’s playing someone quite different: Mrs Wormwood in the new Matilda the Musical film, which will be released in cinemas on Friday 25th November. The film is an adaptation of Tim Minchin’s hit West End musical of the same name, and stars Emma Thompson as Mrs Trunchbull and Stephen Graham as Mr Wormwood. Andrea joins Emma Barnett to discuss what it’s like capturing the camp, comedy, and darkness of one of Roald Dahl’s most famous and reviled characters. As Jennifer Aniston speaks publicly for the first time about her fertility struggles and says she wishes someone had told her to “Freeze your eggs. Do yourself a favour”, Emma talks to one woman who’s put her future on ice, and a lecturer in Women’s Health from UCL who’s warning against women viewing egg freezing as a guaranteed insurance policy. In the run up to the men’s football World Cup 2022 being held in Qatar, it was the England women's footballers who were the most outspoken about staging the tournament in a country which outlaws being gay and where women’s rights are severely curtailed. On Woman’s Hour yesterday we asked if there was any point in further protests as fans now clamour to enjoy the game – today we ask Rothna Begum, Senior Women’s Rights Researcher at Human Rights Watch, how the tournament is affecting women in Qatar. Tampax has been causing quite a stir on social media after a Tweet they posted went viral. Putting its own spin on the popular 'You are in their DMs' memes about men approaching women flirtatiously on social media, the tampon company explicitly referenced how its products are used by women in a tweet on Monday, writing, 'You're in their DMs. We're in them. We are not the same'. The post has racked up more than 360,000 likes and 73,600 retweets proving that there were plenty of fans, but critics accused the brand of going too far and calling people to #BoycottTampax. Emma speaks to Chella Quint, the founder of Period Positive, a menstruation education advisor, comic and author of the books 'Be Period Positive' and 'Own Your Period'.
56:31 23/11/22
Ten Years of Stalking Laws: 'Changing attitudes is harder than changing the law'
To mark ten years since stalking became a specific crime in England and Wales Woman's Hour has a special programme looking at what’s changed in that time. We have exclusive data on how this is being dealt with by police. The BBC's Gemma Dunstan joins Emma Barnett in the studio to go through the findings. One question we wanted to answer is what efforts have been made to get to the crux of the problem; to stop stalkers from stalking. Woman's Hour were granted extremely rare access to one of the three specialist stalking units around the UK. These units brings together police, psychologists, probation staff and victim advocates to decide the best steps to take to minimise the risk of stalking incidents. Emma Barnett visited the London Unit which has been in operation for 4 years. We are joined by the crime reporter, presenter and podcast host Isla Traquair. In her day job Isla is used to confronting murderers and travelling to dangerous places but it was in a quiet village in Wiltshire where her stalking ordeal took place. In August this year Isla's neighbour, Jonathan Barrett, was found guilty of stalking. This followed what Isla calls a 7 month period of terror from March to September 2021, she joins Emma in the studio. How are police dealing with a huge rise in the number of stalking cases? Emma puts this question and others to to Paul Mills, Deputy Chief Constable for Wiltshire Police. He is also the National Police Chief's Council lead for Stalking and Harassment. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
56:49 21/11/22
Weekend Woman's Hour: BBC 100, Auntie Beeb with Mel Giedroyc, Incels, Women in Space
Monday marked 100 years since the BBC began broadcasting on radio. To celebrate that centenary, we commissioned a poem by Kim Moore and created a soundscape to show how much women’s lives, and the noises that surround them, have changed - using BBC archive from the 1920s right through to the present day. Why did the BBC get its nickname ‘Auntie’? And what kind of aunt would she be? We discuss with television presenter and comedian Mel Giedroyc and historian of the BBC, Professor Jean Seaton. ‘The Secret World of Incels’ is a Channel 4 documentary that gives a window into the lives of Incels and explores what makes them engage with these misogynist online forums that have led to some horrific acts of violence. We discuss with its presenter Ben Zand and Dr Kaitlyn Regehr. The Internet Watch Foundation has been tracking the increasing trend of perpetrators grooming children online and coercing them into sexually abusing themselves on camera. The foundation has recognised a lot of what they are seeing as Category A, the most severe kind of sexual abuse, due to it including penetration with an object. A snapshot study out yesterday looks into the objects being used, and how they are everyday domestic items that can be found in the household. We hear from Susie Hargreaves, CEO of the IWF, and Vicki Green, CEO of the Marie Collins Foundation. The story contains content that some listeners may find distressing. What does the Artemis moon mission mean for women? We speak to Llbby Jackson from the UK Space Agency. The Big Swing is the world’s first double female-fronted big band. It is led by jazz musicians Georgina Jackson and Emma Smith who aim to elevate female visibility in the big band world. They join us in the studio for a special performance.
53:09 19/11/22
Jill Goldston, Internet Watch Foundation report, Getaway Girls in Leeds, Cash for Babies Scandal
The Internet Watch Foundation has been tracking the increasing trend of perpetrators grooming children online and coercing them into sexually abusing themselves on camera. The foundation has recognised a lot of what they are seeing as Category A, the most severe kind of sexual abuse, due to it including penetration with an object. Some of the child victims of this online sexual abuse are as young as 7 years old. For the first time, a snapshot study out today looks into the objects being used, and how they are everyday domestic items that can be found in the household. We hear from Susie Hargreaves, CEO of the Internet Watch Foundation, and CEO of the Marie Collins Foundation, which supports child victims of online abuse, Vicki Green. The story contains content that some listeners may find distressing. She's been on screen in nearly 2,000 different film and TV appearances and yet she may have completely escaped your notice. Now the woman thought to be Britain's most prolific extra - Jill Goldston - has become the actual star of a short film called "Jill, Uncredited". She joins Anita in the studio to talk about her life lived just out of focus behind some of the world's biggest movie stars. It's Children in Need tonight so we thought we'd look at one of the projects it funds. Getaway Girls is a charity which first opened its doors to women and girls in Leeds 35 years ago initially offering girls a safe space to go to make friends and learn new skills to empower them and help grow their confidence. Over the years it has worked to support girls who have experienced difficulties at home from domestic violence, exploitation or sexual abuse to newly arrived refugees. Getaway Girls has received funding from BBC Children in Need since 2010 and this year in partnership with BBC Radio 2 it has a new home thanks to the DIY SOS the Big Build team. Alia Nessa, Operations Manager at Getaway Girls talks about the project. We speak to Judith Kilshaw who was once seen as Britain’s ‘most hated woman'. She caused outrage internationally after she and her husband paid a fee to adopt twin babies in the US. The case led to a change in UK adoption law and now she is speaking out in a new documentary which tells the stories of the three mothers involved. Naomi Angell, head of Adoption, Surrogacy and fertility law unit at Osbornes Law explains how the legal situation has changed. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Susie Hargreaves Interviewed Guest: Vicki Green Interviewed Guest: Jill Goldston Interviewed Guest: Alia Nessa Interviewed Guest: Judith Kilshaw Interviewed Guest: Naomi Angell
56:37 18/11/22
The Big Swing’s Georgina Jackson and Emma Smith. Bronwyn Curtis, Vicky Pryce, Dr Kaitlyn Regehr and Ben Zand
The Big Swing is the world’s first double female-fronted big band. It is led by jazz musicians Georgina Jackson and Emma Smith. On Friday 18th November they will be performing at EFG London Jazz Festival and Cadogan Hall, where they will present their own unique interpretations of the old-school big band jazz tradition, adding their own brand of style and charisma. They join Emma to discuss why they felt the need to elevate female visibility in the big band world and to perform live. Of an estimated 18,000 incels, or involuntary celibates, globally, 2500 of them are based in the UK. ‘The Secret World of Incels’ is a Channel 4 documentary that gives a window into their lives and explores what makes them engage with these misogynist online forums that have led to some horrific acts of violence. Presenter, Ben Zand tells us about his experience of entering what he describes as a world full of men ‘addicted to hopelessness’. And Dr Kaitlyn Regehr, an Associate Professor in Digital Humanities discusses her concerns over the normalising of incels into our culture and the growing impact on boys and young men. Are you struggling to make ends meet with inflation at upwards of 11% with rising energy and food prices eating into your budget? Later today the Chancellor of the Exchequer Jeremy Hunt will announce the government’s plans for the economy. What will it means for you and for women in all sectors of the economy, whether you’re in work, on benefits or on a pension? We talk to Bronwyn Curtis is an expert in finance and commodities and Vicky Pryce is chief economic adviser at the Centre for Economics and Business Research. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Managers: Andrew Garratt and Steve Greenwood.
53:25 17/11/22
Poet Joelle Taylor, Fantasy Football and Yusra Mardini and Sally El Hosaini
Poet Joelle Taylor won the Polari Prize last night and the TS Eliot Prize in January this year. Over a long career as a writer for the page and the stage she has explored butch lesbian counterculture and told the stories of the women in underground communities fighting for the right to be themselves. She joins Emma Barnett to explain how joining the literary establishment fits with a lifetime of protest. As Deputy Prime Minister and Justice Minister Dominic Raab stands in for Prime Minister's Questions today, despite accusations of bullying, we look at how MPs and the macho culture of Westminster can be called to account without an ethics advisor, since Lord Geidt resigned earlier this year. Emma speaks to Pippa Crerar political editor of The Guardian and Christine Jardine, Liberal Democrat MP Edinburgh West, spokesperson for Cabinet Office, Women and Equalities and Scotland, who yesterday tabled a bill asking for parliament to appoint an ethics advisor if the conservative party fails to do so. We speak to director Sally El Hosaini about her new film The Swimmers which is based on the true story two Syrian sisters who fled Damascus in a dinghy boat in order to escape war and build a new life for themselves. One of those sisters, Yusra Mardini, will also be speaking to Emma Barnett about how she feels about her story being turned into a film. Fantasy Football is a hugely popular online game which requires building a make believe team of real world players who compete in the Premier League. But the growth of women managers has exceeded that of men in the last five years, rising by 112%. With the Premier League taking a break for the first ever winter World Cup, we explore the challenges early female participants of Fantasy Football have faced and what their participation in the game, and a growing interest in football, could have on the sport.
57:45 16/11/22
Practical advice for anxious mothers. Burns specialist Professor Fiona Wood. Iran protests
The imagery around pregnancy is often of glowing women doing yoga with calm expressions. For many women through it can be a time of anxiety about the birth, the baby, the future. All perfectly natural but it can be hard to ask for or access help. A new book ‘Break Free From Maternal Anxiety’ A self-help Guide for Pregnancy, Birth and the First Postnatal Year’ offers CBT-based support. One of the authors Dr Catherine Green joins Emma Barnett to share professional and personal experience. We hear from Professor Fiona Wood a world leading burns specialist the reluctant subject of a new book ‘Under Her Skin’. She was the first female plastic surgeon in Western Australia (in 1991) and has been named Australia’s Most Trusted Person and National Living Treasure becoming a household name after she led a team that helped saved the lives of people injured in the Bali bombing. Women continue to lead protests in Iran. But many Iranians say speaking out against the regime brings real risks. Now according to State Media a court in Iran has issued the first death sentence to a person arrested for taking part. We get the latest from Faranak Amidi the BBC's Near East Women's Affairs Reporter and Rushanara Ali the Labour MP for Bethnal Green and Bow about what she wants the UK Government to do. A tribute to Sue Baker one of the original members of the Top Gear team who's died. Plus tampon tax campaigner Laura Coryton on new research which suggests at least 80% of the savings, as a result of the tax ending two years ago has been absorbed by retailers. Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell
56:38 15/11/22
BBC 100 - Kim Moore poem with women's voices, Auntie Beeb with Mel Giedroyc, former MP Anne Milton on Gavin Williamson
Today it is 100 years since the BBC began broadcasting on radio. To celebrate that centenary, we have commissioned a poem by Kim Moore and created a soundscape to show how much women’s lives, and the noises that surround them, have changed - using BBC archive from the 1920s right through to the present day. We also ask why did the BBC get its nickname ‘Auntie’? And what kind of aunt would she be? To mark 100 years since the BBC started daily radio broadcasts, Emma Barnett is joined by television presenter and comedian Mel Giedroyc and historian of the BBC Professor Jean Seaton. Sir Gavin Williamson resigned from the cabinet last week following allegations of bullying; the Labour MP Charlotte Nichols has claimed there is a "whisper list" of 40 politicians to never accept a drink from or be alone with; and claims have emerged over the weekend that civil servants at the Ministry of Justice were offered “respite or a route out” when Deputy Prime Minister Dominic Raab was reappointed last month. Emma asks Anne Milton, the former deputy chief whip who has accused Gavin Williamson of subjecting MPs to “unethical and immoral behaviour" - whether we can infer a 'blokeish' culture in politics. We also hear from Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor at the Spectator. Anna Sorokin was born to an ordinary family in Moscow, before moving to Germany as a teenager. But upon arriving in New York, she transformed herself into Anna Delvey, a German multimillionaire heiress with a trust fund in Europe. She used this persona to lead a lavish lifestyle and conned friends, big banks and hotels into thinking that her fortune could cover the luxury she desired. But it was all a con. She was found guilty in 2019 of theft of services and grand larceny, having scammed more than $200,000 (£145,000) and spent almost four years in jail. In her first radio interview since being released, Anna Delvey joins Emma.
57:56 14/11/22
Weekend Woman's Hour: LeAnn Rimes, Women in the Royal Navy, Althea McNish
The Grammy award-winning singer, songwriter and actress LeAnn Rimes joins us in the studio. Her unforgettable ballad "How Do I Live" holds the record as Billboard’s Hot 100 all-time #1 hit by a female artist. She talks about the inspiration her latest album, God’s Work. A woman who served in the Royal Navy for 20 years speaks for the first time about how she was raped and sexually assaulted during her career. The woman who we are calling Catherine says that when a senior colleague discovered she was pregnant, they suggested that an appointment be made for her to have an abortion. The Conservative MP Sarah Atherton serves on the Defence Select Committee, and led an inquiry last year into the experiences of women in the armed forces, which heard from 4200 women, including some 9% of women currently serving in the armed forces. The Atherton report found that 64% of female veterans and 58% of currently-serving women reported experiencing bullying, harassment or discrimination during their careers. She gives her response to Catherine’s story. Lotte Wubben-Moy has become the latest women’s football player to say she won’t be watching the World Cup in Qatar, because of where it’s being held and their stance on homosexuality and equal rights. Suzy Wrack from the Guardian tells us why women speaking out about this is so significant. Althea McNish was the first Caribbean designer to achieve international recognition and is one of the UK’s most influential textile designers. There’s currently a major retrospective of her, Althea McNish: Colour is Mine at the Whitworth in Manchester. Rose Sinclair, Lecturer in Design Education at Goldsmiths, University of London, co-curated the exhibition. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucy Wai Editor: Louise Corley
55:40 12/11/22
LeAnn Rimes, Professor Julie Cupples, Fiona Macintosh, Ebinehita Iyere, Professor Asma Khalil
The Grammy award-winning singer, songwriter and actress LeAnn Rimes released her first album, Blue, aged 13 and at 14 she won "Best New Artist”. Her unforgettable ballad "How Do I Live" holds the record as Billboard’s Hot 100 all-time #1 hit by a female artist. She joins Anita Rani to talk about the inspiration her latest album – god’s work – which features artists including Ziggy Marley and Aloe Blacc. We’ll be getting an insight into what life behind bars is like for female activists in Nicaragua. Professor Julie Cupples, an Academic who has written about the country and spent time doing fieldwork for her thesis, will be speaking to Anita Rani along with Fiona Macintosh an author who was in Nicaragua at the time of political revolution in the 1980’s. They’ll both be sharing their experiences of women trying to push for revolution in the country. A new report ‘Girls Speak: Pushed Out, Left Out’ from the charity Agenda Alliance highlights the problem of persistent adultification in schools which often leads to extra harsh discipline for Black and dual heritage girls. Anita speaks to Ebinehita Iyere who collaborated on the report joins Anita. With early indications that COVID-19 rates are beginning to rise ahead of winter and a predicted flu wave, the UK Health Security Agency and NHS say it’s essential that pregnant women come forward and get protected. Anita is joined by Claire who contracted covid-19 when she was pregnant & Professor Asma Khalil, Professor of Obstetrics and Maternal-Fetal Medicine at St George’s University Hospital, University of London. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Michael Millham
55:14 11/11/22
Woman in the Royal Navy 'was raped on ship'
A woman who served in the Royal Navy for 20 years speaks for the first time about how she was raped and sexually assaulted during her career. Speaking to Emma Barnett on Woman’s Hour she describes experiencing several other incidents of sexual harassment during her time serving, including a colleague putting his penis on her shoulder. She says that when a senior colleague discovered she was pregnant, they suggested that an appointment be made for her to have an abortion. The Conservative MP Sarah Atherton serves on the Defence Select Committee, and led an inquiry last year into the experiences of women in the armed forces, which heard from 4200 women, including some 9% of women currently serving in the armed forces. The Atherton report found that 64 percent of female veterans and 58 percent of currently-serving women reported experiencing bullying harassment or discrimination during their careers. Sarah joins Emma to give her response to Catherine’s story. Lieutenant colonel Diane Allen, served for 37 years in the Army before resigning last year. She has previously called for a Me Too moment across the military. Diane has a website- forwarned - where she collates testimony from serving and former service personnel and joins Emma Barnett. At 53, Jenifer Aniston has opened up for the first time about spending years ‘throwing everything’ at trying to conceive, following years of speculation. There are so many stories of eventual happy endings for those on the infertility road. But what about those how who don’t have that? Emma Barnett is joined by Caroline Stafford, a baker, who shares her own experiences of what happens when things don’t work out. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
58:11 10/11/22
Women's Rugby League World Cup, Matt Hancock in the jungle, Friends Forever - Nina, US midterms
England's Rugby League Women's team play their next World Cup match against Papua New Guinea tonight. Joining Emma to talk about how to get more women involved in the game are the official Women's Ambassador for the Rugby League World Cup Jodie Cunningham and the Captain Emily Rudge. Jodie is also an Ambassador for the RLWC's Social Impact Programme which champions inclusive volunteering. We hear from volunteer Jenny Robinson, who is a wheelchair user and has learning disabilities, who says it's changed her life. Whether you choose to watch or not, you won’t have escaped the news that reality show I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! is back on TV and that Matt Hancock, the former Health Secretary during the pandemic, who had to resign over breaking his own rules when an affair with an aide was exposed by the newspapers - is due to make his first appearance in the jungle camp in Australia tonight. Christine Hamilton, media personality and author, married to former Conservative MP Neil Hamilton - came third in the first series of I'm a Celebrity 20 years ago - back in 2002. She gives her view to Emma, as does Dr Cathy Gardner, who brought a judicial review on the government's discharge policy of hospitals to care homes at the beginning of the pandemic against Matt Hancock, the NHS and Public Health England – and won. Results are being declared in the US midterm elections. The Republicans currently have the most seats in the House of Representatives but it is still unclear which party could gain control of the Senate. Abortion has played a role in these elections, with the first batch of exit polls showing that for 3 in 10 Americans, abortion was the most important issue. The Democrats ran campaigns that focussed on abortion rights and poll as the most trusted party with this issue, but has the importance of abortion rights been overplayed? Emma speaks to Amanda Taub, writer for The New York Times. Over the last few weeks we've been talking about the power and the pain of female friendship. A Woman's Hour Listener we are calling Nina contacted us - she was listening to one of the episodes exploring whether friendships can be repaired - and it really chimed with her. Our reporter Jo Morris met Nina at her home to hear her story.
56:43 09/11/22
Textile designer Althea McNish, Albanian female asylum seekers, endurance athlete Jenny Tough
Following, Elon Musk’s announcement that Twitter will permanently suspend any account on the social media platform that impersonates another, Nuala McGovern is joined by crime writer, Denise Mina who changed her twitter display name to ‘Elon Musk’. Jenny Tough is an endurance athlete who's best known for running and cycling in some of world's most challenging events. For a forthcoming film - SOLO - she set herself an audacious objective: to run – solo and unsupported, across mountain ranges on six continents, starting with one of the most remote locations on earth in Kyrgystan. She joins Nuala to describe how mountains give her a sense of home and why travelling solo is a “force for joy”. We speak to Anti Trafficking Social worker Lauren Starkey and Human rights Journalist about new research that suggests Albanian women are more likely to have their asylum applications approveddue to the threat they face from trafficking. They’ll be sharing the experiences of some of the women with Nuala McGovern and give us an insight into the dangers that female asylum seekers face day to day. Textile designer Althea McNish was the first Caribbean designer to achieve international recognition and is one of the UK’s most influential and innovative textile designers. There’s currently a major retrospective of her, Althea McNish: Colour is Mine at the Whitworth in Manchester on tour from William Morris Gallery, Walthamstow. Rose Sinclair a Lecturer in Design Education at Goldsmiths, University of London co-curated the exhibition. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
57:33 08/11/22
Lorna Luft on White Christmas. Mussolini's daughter. COP 27
Hailing from theatrical royalty, daughter of Judy Garland, actor and singer Lorna Luft is recognised as an iconic star of stage and screen. About to embark on a UK tour playing housekeeper Martha Watson in the much-loved musical White Christmas, she joins Emma Barnett to explain what draws her back to this role time after time. The Prime Minister is in Sharm El Sheikh for this year's COP27 UN climate change summit - after coming under some pressure to attend in person. But 110 country leaders will be there. Money will feature high on the agenda and is sure to be a sticking point in negotiations. Leaders of those representing developing countries want developed nations like the US, UK and those of the EU to pay for the "loss and damage" they've suffered. We hear from Elise Buckle co-founder of SheChanges Climate and environmental campaigner Georgia Elliott Smith who is not going to this COP A new biography of Edda Mussolini highlights her pivotal role in 1930s Italy during one of the most violent periods in human history. As the daughter of Italian dictator Benito Mussolini she was a powerful proponent of the fascist movement. Author of a new book all about her - Edda Mussolini the Most Dangerous Woman in Europe. - Caroline Moorehead joins Emma Barnett to talk about her role as a key role player and not just a witness to twentieth century European history. And we want your help. A listener got in touch to describe how, in a discussion with a male colleague about the gender pay gap, she was told to ‘not take it personally’ and ‘calm down’. She'd like you tips on how to as she puts it "tackle this rebuttal often used by men to silence women who attempt to challenge male dominance in the work place” Presenter Emma Barnett Producer Beverley Purcell
56:21 07/11/22
Anne Longfield, Shonda Rhimes, Betsy Beers, Sudha Bhuchar, Claire Mason, Romy Gill
Shonda Rhimes and Betsy Beers are the producing partners behind some of the biggest American TV dramas of modern times – and they are always female character led. They include Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal, How to Get Away with Murder, and of course the Netflix hit Bridgerton – adapted from Julia Quinn’s racy novels set in the Regency era in England. The first series was released at the end of 2020, and is well known for having racially diverse cast and steamy sex scenes. Anita Rani speaks to Shonda and Betsy about their work and new projects. We hear how primary school pupils, as well as youngsters from middle class ‘leafy suburbs’, are being lured into gangs and county lines drug running according to Anne Longfield in her new report for the Commission on Young Lives. A new project, led by Lancaster University, has created memory boxes, designed to help women whose babies are taken into care at birth while a court determines their child’s future. We hear why these ‘Hope boxes’ are so important to the women who developed the idea and Research Fellow, Claire Mason who supported them. And discuss why the number of newborns in care proceedings in England and Wales has increased over the past decade. The actor and playwright Sudha Bhuchar discusses ‘Evening Conversations’ currently on stage at the Soho Theatre in London. And Inspired by the epic Himalayan scenes featured in Bollywood films, chef and food writer Romy Gill details her journey from Kashmir to Ladakh, sharing recipes she learned along the way. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lisa Jenkinson Studio Manager: Michael Millham
57:15 04/11/22
Dame Sharon White - Chair of John Lewis, Beth Mead, Caroline and Rose Quentin
Dame Sharon White is the first ever female chair of John Lewis Partnership and was recently named the UK’s most influential black person in the 2023 Powerlist. She became the chair of the John Lewis Partnership in January 2020 just as the Covid pandemic hit and is responsible for turning around the fortunes of John Lewis and Waitrose in what is widely seen as the most challenging time in the company’s history. She joins Emma. The accolades just keep coming for Beth Mead, she won the Golden Boot - meaning she scored the most goals - and Player of the Tournament at the Euro's earlier this year, and last month she was runner-up in the Ballon d'Or which decides the best player in the world. Beth, who plays for Arsenal in the Women's Super League, has a new book out called Lioness: My Journey To Glory and joins Emma in the studio. Men Behaving Badly star Caroline Quentin is joined by her daughter Rose for a new touring production of the George Bernard Shaw play, Mrs Warren’s Profession. They play Mrs Warren and her daughter Vivie, who suffers a crisis of conscience when she discovers that her comfortable life has been funded by her mother’s work in the sex industry. Caroline and Rose join Emma to discuss their relationship and their first experience of working together.
56:36 03/11/22
Cat Power, US Midterms, Hope Boxes, writer Yasmin El-Rifae
Chan Marshall, better known by her stage name Cat Power, is an American singer, songwriter and producer. After three decades in the music industry, she has eight original albums under her belt but has also made three cover albums. The most recent saw her singing everything from the work of The Pogues to Lana Del Rey. This Saturday she will be recreating Bob Dylan’s iconic 1966 Royal Albert Hall concert. It was one of the most controversial tours in the history of rock & roll, where Dylan enraged fans for electrifying his songs. Power will be performing them in the same order as Dylan himself: the first half of the show will be acoustic before an electric band join her for the second half. Chan joins Emma to talk music, motherhood and honouring a rock and roll icon. With just five days to go until the US midterms, Emma takes a look at what matters to women voters. On Monday we heard from a former Republican strategist, today Emma will be joined by Democratic Party political strategist and former head of EMILY’s List, Stephanie Schriock. A new project, led by Lancaster University, has created memory boxes, designed to help women whose babies are taken into care at birth while a court determines their child’s future. We hear why these ‘Hope boxes’ are so important to the women who developed the idea and Research Fellow, Claire Mason who supported them. And discuss why the number of newborns in care proceedings in England and Wales has increased over the past decade. We revisit the events of the Egyptian protests in 2012-2013 in Tahrir Square in Cairo, with the author Yasmin El-Rifae. Her book, ‘Radius, A Story of Feminist Revolution', tells the story of the women and men who formed Opantish – Operation Anti-Sexual Harassment and Assault to intervene in the spiralling cases of sexual violence against women in the square. The group members often risked assault themselves and Yasmin was also one of their organisers.
56:55 02/11/22
What's a feminist city look like? Female doctors and the menopause. Jan Etherington on bickering.
Glasgow has become the first city in the UK to officially adopt a feminist town-planning-approach. Emma Barnett speaks to the woman behind the proposal Scottish Green Councillor Holly Bruce and the author of ‘Feminist City’ Leslie Kern. What's a feminist city look like and what changes can we expect to see in Glasgow. One in five female doctors say they have considered early retirement due to menopause symptoms. A new report warns that without better support there could be ‘an exodus’ of female doctors from the NHS. Emma talks to Dame Jane Dacre, President of the Medical Protection Society, a not-for-profit protection organisation for healthcare professionals, who conducted the survey. Plus, Dr Nadira Awal, a GP who specialises in Women’s Health. The Treasury has warned of "inevitable" tax rises as Prime Minister Rishi Sunak seeks to fill a "black hole" in public finances. They agreed "tough decisions" were needed on tax rises, as well as on spending. The Treasury gave no details but said "everybody would need to contribute more in tax in the years ahead". So how did we get here, what are the changes announced in a couple of weeks' time likely to be and how will they affect you? We hear from two women in the know Claer Barratt the consumer editor at the Financial Times and Dame DeAnne Julius a Fellow in Global Economy and Finance at Chatham House, and a founder member of the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) of the Bank of England Plus Jan Etherington the writer of Radio 4’s comedy Conversations from a Long Marriage joins Emma to discuss the highs and lows of bickering. Producer Beverley Purcell Presenter Emma Barnett
56:43 01/11/22
Donna Patterson, Running in the dark, Tammy Faye Musical
After Donna Patterson's maternity leave, her employer Morrison’s gave her a full-time role, despite her only working part time. She represented herself in a tribunal and she won a £60k pay-out for maternity discrimination. Donna joins Emma Barnett in the studio. As the clocks go back - and the nights draw in- it can get harder to find the motivation to get outdoors and exercise as the couch beckons. At the weekend the Olympic champion cyclist Chris Boardman wrote about this issue as he was aware that his wife and daughters were affected by this. Rather than putting the onus on women to keep safe he wants men to take more responsibility, he joins Emma alongside Robyn Vinter, the North of England correspondent of the Guardian, who is a runner and also wrote about this issue very recently. Tammy Faye – A New Musical tells the story of rise and fall of American TV evangelists Tammy Faye and her husband Jim Bakker, who preached to millions across the country via their own television satellite channel PTL, Ministry and theme park. The musical written by James Graham features original songs by Elton John and Jake Shears of the Scissor sisters. Olivier award winning actor Katie Brayben takes on the role of Tammy at the Almeida theatre in London. It’s just one week until the midterm elections in the United States. The Republican Party are widely expected to take the House of Representatives – but the Senate could still go either way. So what does this mean for women in America, and how could their opinions on political issues such as Roe v Wade swing the vote? Emma Barnett talks to republican political strategist and talk show host Jennifer Kerns. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce
57:19 31/10/22
Weekend Woman’s Hour: climate activist Vanessa Nakate, rogue landlords, deepfake porn, Goth fashion, the state of child care
According to the OECD, the UK is the third most expensive country for childcare. ‘March of the Mummies’ organised by the campaign group Pregnant then Screwed are demanding for government reform. Its founder Joeli Brearley told Elaine Dunkley why. 25-year-old Ugandan climate activist Vanessa Nakate who launched her own climate movement in 2019 protesting outside the gates of the Ugandan parliament. Now a UNICEF ambassador she joined Jess to discuss her book ‘A Bigger Picture’ and what COP27 next week. A new BBC documentary looks at how deepfake technology is being used to create hardcore pornography of women without their consent. Presenter of the documentary Jess Davies and leading deepfake and synthetic media expert Henry Ajder joined Krupa. In a report out this week, MPs say too many women who’ve survived domestic abuse are ending up in appalling accommodation operated by rogue landlords who exploit housing benefit loopholes to cash in on a ‘gold rush’ of taxpayers’ money. Krupa talked to Becky Rogerson, CEO of Wearside Women in Need & the Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Select Committee for Housing and Communities, Clive Betts Labour MP. Fashion librarian Katie Godman's book 'Gothic Fashion - From Barbarian to Haute Couture' traces the roots of this long-lived, popular and adaptable look. She joined Jess and listeners share their stories of when and why they went Gothic. Flo & Joan, the multi-award winning British musical comedy duo Nicola and Rosie Dempsey. They cover everything from women’s safety to dating apps to mental health through their witty comedy songs. Their sell-out 140-date international tour, Sweet Release, has just been extended. Presenter: Elaine Dunkley Producer: Surya Elango Editor: Lucinda Montefiore
54:55 29/10/22
Childcare in the UK: does it need an overhaul?
According to the OECD, the UK is the third most expensive country for childcare. An estimated 1.7 million women in England are prevented from doing more hours of work by childcare issues, while a UNICEF report this week shows that almost 1 in 5 parents on low incomes are skipping meals to pay for it. On Saturday, 12,000 mums will descend on 11 locations across the UK to demand government reform in a ‘March of the Mummies’ organised by the campaign group Pregnant then Screwed. Its founder Joeli Brearley tells us why. From tax-free childcare to the 30 free hours offer, why do we have the childcare policies that we do? Who are they supposed to target and who really benefits? We discuss with Christine Farquharson, senior research economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and Megan Jarvie, Head of Family and Childcare at the charity Coram. The number of childcare providers in England has dropped by 4000 between March 2021 and March 2022. A survey of 2,000 early years providers in March found 30% were currently operating at a loss, while 34% said they expected to be in 12 months' time. Meanwhile a 2020 report from the Social Mobility Commission shows that one in eight nursery workers earned less than £5 an hour. To discuss the challenges facing the sector, we speak to Neil Leitch, CEO of the Early Years Alliance and Jennie Bailey, owner of a nursery in Hampshire. What are the opportunities and challenges of employing working parents? Elaine Stern is a mother of three and owner of a marketing and production agency employing 35 workers. She discusses how requests for flexible-working or a lack of accessible affordable childcare can impact on business. How can we arrive at an accessible, affordable, high quality childcare system in the UK? We ask our panel, including Jemima Olchawski CEO of the Fawcett Society, whether government proposals to deregulate the childcare sector will work, how other countries compare to the UK, and whether the sometime conflicting needs of parents, children, providers and employers can be reconciled. Presenter: Elaine Dunkley Producer: Lucy Wai Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Joeli Brearly Interviewed Guest: Megan Jarvie Interviewed Guest: Christine Farquharson Interviewed Guest: Jennie Bailey Interviewed Guest: Neil Leitch Interviewed Guest: Elaine Stern Interviewed Guest: Jemime Olchawski
56:58 28/10/22
Rogue refuges update, Una Marson, Agony aunts, Iran
In a shocking report out today MPs say too many women who’ve survived domestic abuse are ending up in appalling accommodation operated by rogue landlords who exploit housing benefit loopholes to cash in on a ‘gold rush’ of taxpayers’ money. Some women and their children find themselves housed in mixed-sex provision, or even alongside their perpetrators. The current rules mean anyone can set up what is called Exempt Accommodation if they offer care, support, or supervision that is ‘more than minimal’. One provider left a loaf of bread and some jam to achieve that standard. Others say fitting CCTV is enough to qualify. The All Party Parliamentary Select Committee on Levelling Up Housing and Communities make a number of recommendations aimed at stopping unscrupulous operators getting enhanced housing benefit without providing the wraparound support and staff they’re meant to offer survivors of domestic abuse. Krupa Padhy talks to the Chair of the Committee Clive Betts Labour MP and Becky Rogerson, CEO of Wearside Women in Need. In 1691, a journalist called John Dunton was having an affair and realised there was no one he could ask for advice about it without revealing his identity. Realising his situation couldn’t be unique, he invited readers of his newspaper to submit their problems. Today agony aunt columns are the mainstay of the back pages of our newspapers and magazines. But why do we still seek comfort from the written advice of strangers? Krupa Padhy is joined by best-selling author and Sunday Times Style agony aunt Dolly Alderton, and author of ‘Never Kiss A Man in a Canoe,’ Tanith Carey. Yesterday marked 40 days since the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini who died in police custody after being arrested for allegedly wearing her hijab “improperly”. Thousands of mourners gathered near Amini’s grave in her hometown of Saqqez where Iranian police reportedly fired live rounds and tear gas at the crowds. Protests have taken place across the country since Mahsa’s death on 16th September and women have been at the forefront of the movement, removing their headscarves and cutting their hair in public in solidarity. Faranak Amidi, the BBC's Near East women affairs reporter, joins Krupa. On Woman’s Hour we talk about girls a lot, how we raise them, keeping them safe, their mental and physical health but we don’t often talk to them. For an occasional series called Girl’s World, Ena Miller went to talk to India and Alice at their school about their lives, the things they think about, chat about and worry about. She took along her teenage diary to jog her memory about the secret world of the teenage girl. When Una Marson became the BBC's first black radio producer and presenter in the 1940s, she brought Caribbean voices and culture to a global audience. Krupa speaks to actor Seroca Davis on playing Una in BBC2’s documentary-drama ‘Una Marson, Our Lost Caribbean Voice’.
57:25 27/10/22
Hygiene Poverty, Hanna Flint, Lumberjills
The new Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has appointed his team of top ministers but out of 31 members there are only seven women in his team. The BBC’s Leila Nathoo joins Jessica alongside Dr Meryl Kenny. Film critic and journalist Hanna Flint has been covering film and culture for nearly a decade. She's now written a book, Strong Female Character: What Movies Teach Us in which she reflects on how cinema has been the key to understanding herself and the world we live in. She joins Jessica Creighton in the studio. The latest inflation figures show the cost of household items like shower gel, toothpaste and shampoo rose by up to 11% from the same time last year. It's led to 3.2 million people saying they are no longer able to afford hygiene products. Ruth Brock is Chief Executive of the charity The Hygiene Bank and joins Jessica alongside Bryony, a mum from the South of England, who explains how it's impacting her. Flo & Joan are the multi-award winning British musical comedy duo Nicola and Rosie Dempsey. They cover everything from women’s safety to dating apps to mental health through their witty and irreverent comedy songs. Their sell-out 140-date international tour, Sweet Release, has just been extended. They will be performing for us live in the studio. This year marks the 80th anniversary of the Women’s Timber Corps - or ‘The Lumberjills’ as they were affectionately called. During World War Two Britain was so desperate for wood it was forced to step-up home-grown timber production. But with a lack of men to saw, manage and count the trees, meant that women from all over the UK stepped into the roles. Joanna Foat, author of Lumberjills: Stronger Together joins Jessica. Presenter: Jessica Creighton Producer: Emma Pearce
53:02 26/10/22