Show cover of Science For Care

Science For Care

Science for Care unveils the stories behind some of the most important scientific and medical breakthroughs of our time. A podcast by HealthTech for Care (https://htfc-eu.com/), a non-profit organisation designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favourite listening platform. Production : MedShake Studio (https://medshake-studio.com/)  Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.

Titres

Biomimicry: when healthcare plays copycat with nature
In today's episode of Science for Care, join Anca Petre as she delves deep into the captivating world of biomimicry – the art and science of observing nature to solve complex human challenges. It’s more than just mimicking the obvious; it's about adapting and innovating using nature’s 3.8 billion years of research and development as our blueprint. Explore the historical evolution of biomimicry, from the Wright brothers drawing inspiration from pigeons for flight, to the foundational contribution of Otto Schmitt and the enlightening insights of Janine Benyus. Listen in as Thomas PEYBERNES from Ceebios unravels the remarkable innovations in healthcare spurred by nature's designs. Discover the fascinating intricacies of the mosquito's painless bite, the transformative potential of the lugworm's hemoglobin, and the unique biocompatible qualities of spider silk in surgery. Biomimicry isn't just about borrowing ideas; it's a testament to the intertwined fates of humans, animals, and the environment. This episode reminds us of the delicate balance between innovation and responsibility, urging us to not only take inspiration from nature but also to give back. Join us in celebrating the profound impact of biomimicry on healthcare and embrace the holistic concept of One Health. Nature's secrets are all around us, and sometimes, the answers we seek are hidden in plain sight. So, the next time you marvel at nature's wonders, remember: imitation isn't just the sincerest form of flattery; it's also the path to groundbreaking innovation. Podcast by HealthTech for Care Production: MedShake Studio  Host: Anca Petre  Guest: Thomas PEYBERNESHosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
09:19 14/12/2023
Digital Twins in Healthcare: A Heartfelt Revolution in Cardiology
Welcome to another enlightening episode of Science for Care with your host, Anca Petre. In this episode, we delve deep into the heart of medical innovation by exploring the concept of "digital twins" – a groundbreaking approach set to reshape the future of cardiology.  As cardiovascular diseases continue to be the world's leading cause of death, there's a pressing demand for innovative, predictive, and personalized healthcare solutions. Enter the universe of digital twins. Originally envisioned by NASA in the 1960s for space missions, digital twins provide real-time virtual replicas of physical entities, be it a spacecraft or, as we'll learn, the human heart.  Join us as Myriam Beaves, the Business Director at 3DEXPERIENCE Lab of Dassault Systèmes, sheds light on the transformative journey of digital twins. From creating virtual aerospace solutions to recently pioneering virtual trials for cardiovascular diseases, 3DEXPERIENCE Lab stands at the forefront of this revolution. In this episode, we'll discover how the synthesis of technology, science, and healthcare could offer profound insights into cardiological issues before they manifest in the real world. As digital twins promise to usher in a new age of medical treatment and patient care, this episode is a must-listen for anyone eager to understand the future of healthcare and cardiology. Podcast by HealthTech for Care Production: MedShake Studio  Host: Anca Petre  Guest: Myriam BeavesHosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
09:13 30/11/2023
No ‘Stranger Things’ than remote patient monitoring!
Dive into the revolutionary world of Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) in this riveting episode of Science for Care. Hosted by Anca Petre, we journey from the space age beginnings of RPM, where it monitored astronauts' health in the great cosmic beyond, to its profound terrestrial impact today. But why is RPM reminiscent of doctor's house calls of the past? How did a pandemic pivot its role in cancer care? Learn about the dawn of RPM, a system that teleports the doctor's black leather bag into the digital age, replacing it with cutting-edge software. Unravel its origins that orbit around NASA's ambitious efforts in the 1960s and its evolution on Earth, bringing a digital revolution to healthcare. Especially in oncology, RPM stands as a beacon of hope, offering patients a lifeline during pandemic-induced lockdowns.  Gain insights from Paul-Louis BELLETANTE, the Chief Medical & Compliance Officer at Resilience Care. Understand the challenges RPM faces, particularly in Europe where the funding paradigm is ever-evolving. Discover how RPM startups like Resilience are innovating to enhance healthcare accessibility and quality. And, as we zoom out, RPM's story isn't just about advanced healthcare. It's about resilience, empowerment, and a paradigm shift in patient care. It's a tale of transformation, akin to how the Beatles changed music and 'Game of Thrones' changed television.  Join us as we journey from the infinite vastness of space to the cozy confines of our living rooms, exploring a healthcare innovation that's truly out of this world. Podcast by HealthTech for Care Production: MedShake Studio  Host: Anca Petre  Guest: Paul-Louis BELLETANTEHosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
08:02 16/11/2023
Genetic Marvels: Exploring the Power of Gene Therapy in Cardiology
Welcome to another exhilarating episode of Science for Care. This week, we take you on an extraordinary voyage through time and innovation as we unearth the power and potential of gene therapy. Picture this: a superhero with the might to rewrite our genetic code, mending genetic typos, and filling the blanks. That’s gene therapy for you! Journey back to the 60s, the dawn of our genetic adventures, and witness how a brave young girl named Ashanthi de Silva became the beacon of hope, being the first patient ever to be treated with gene therapy. The challenges, triumphs, and the unyielding spirit of pioneers like Pr Andrew H. Baker from the University of Edinburgh have paved the way to today's groundbreaking advancements. But what does gene therapy mean for our cardiovascular health? How is it addressing the aftermath of heart attacks? And why are coronary artery bypass grafts crucial in this narrative? Discover how gene therapy is making waves in rejuvenating the heart, promoting cell growth, and revolutionizing blood vessel function. But, like any hero's journey, there are hurdles. From delivery challenges to the crucial aspect of bioproduction, Pr Baker offers a candid perspective, sharing insights into how the medical world is gearing up for the widespread application of this remarkable therapy. Described as the Iron Man of medicine, gene therapy promises hope, innovation, and a better tomorrow. So, gear up for an adventure of a lifetime where the heroes don't sport capes, but instead, wield the power of genes. Tune in and join Anca Petre for this captivating exploration. Remember, in the realm of health and science, every discovery counts. Together, let's make a difference! Podcast by HealthTech for Care Production: MedShake Studio  Host: Anca Petre  Guest: Pr Andrew H. BakerHosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
10:17 02/11/2023
Fifty Shades of Pain: The Untold Tale of Endometriosis
Delve into the enigmatic world of endometriosis - a gynecological condition with a history that spans millennia but has only recently gained formal recognition. Journey through its murky waters, from its ancient attributions to its first scientific mention in 1860 by Karel Rokitansky.  In this episode, hear Dr. Emilie Joyeux, a renowned OB-GYN based in France, simplify the complex narrative of endometriosis. Understand its nature, the scientific theories behind its occurrence, and why it's often misdiagnosed, leaving millions of women in undue pain and distress. Then, listen to Marguerite's poignant story, who waited nearly 20 years for a correct diagnosis. Explore her life with this “uninvited guest” and how it seeped into every facet of her existence. With acute pain, chronic fatigue, and other complications, endometriosis is more than just a condition. It's an everyday battle. But there's hope. Discover the latest advancements in research, the treatments in the pipeline, and how medical professionals are arming themselves with better tools to tackle this prevalent yet under-recognized ailment. *"The best way out is always through,"* and the path to understanding endometriosis is no different. Join us for a deep dive into this intricate topic, brought to life by personal stories, expert insights, and a dash of hope for the future.  Podcast by HealthTech for Care Production: MedShake Studio  Host: Anca Petre  Guests: Dr Emilie Joyeux and Marguerite de Rodellec Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
08:45 19/10/2023
Hello, are those my insides you’re looking for?
Journey with Anca Petre on Science for Care as we traverse the timeline of medical imaging. Remember the early days when diagnosing ailments seemed like a mystical dance? Dive deep into the ingenuity of Dr. Rene Laennec and his creation of the stethoscope, an invention that forever changed the realm of medicine.  Venture into the world of ultrasound, as Dr. Karl Dussik ushers in a revolution with ultrasonic waves, giving doctors the much-sought-after ability to 'see' within. Hear from Olivier de Fresnoye of EchOpen as he takes us through the advancements, including POCUS – the pocket-sized ultrasound device turning doctors into real-life superheroes. But there's more! EchOpen aims to render medical imaging accessible for all. Imagine a world where your smartphone transforms into an ultrasound machine, making medical imaging as commonplace as the thermometer in your drawer. Discover the future of healthcare where AI-driven interpretations might just make imaging a household name. Will ultrasounds become the 21st-century stethoscope? Only time will tell. Podcast by HealthTech for Care Production: MedShake Studio  Host: Anca Petre  Guest: Olivier de Fresnoye Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
08:41 05/10/2023
Antibiotics: The Good, the Bad, and the Resistant
In this episode, host Anca Petre takes listeners on a journey from the revolutionary discovery of penicillin by Alexander Fleming in 1928 to the challenging landscape of antibiotic resistance we face today. Once heralded as miracle drugs, antibiotics have reshaped modern medicine, increasing human life expectancy and preventing potential pandemics. However, their misuse has led to rising challenges, including the grave threat of antibiotic resistance. Join us as Frederic Peyrane from the BEAM Alliance highlights the crucial role of antibiotics and the dire need for their judicious use. The WHO warns of an impending crisis with antibiotic resistance being linked to a startling 700,000 deaths annually, a number that could soar to 10 million by 2050. Alongside this human toll, the economic repercussions could reach an overwhelming $100 trillion by 2050.  Despite these challenges, why does the development of new antibiotics remain a less-trodden path? Discover the complexities surrounding antibiotic development and the reasons behind the declining investments in this space. However, hope isn't lost! Frederic Peyrane delves into how broadening our strategy can combat this menace, from rapid diagnostics to diversified therapeutic options. Learn about initiatives like the BEAM Alliance and the AMR Action Fund, which are at the forefront of supporting innovative antimicrobial therapies and funding novel treatments. End this episode with a hopeful toast to the countless researchers, innovators, and front-line warriors striving to ensure a future where antibiotic resistance becomes history. Here's to a healthier, safer world for all! Podcast by HealthTech for Care Production: MedShake Studio  Host: Anca Petre  Guest: Frederic Peyrane Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
08:34 21/09/2023
The metaverse: virtual care for real patients
Explore the intricate weave of technology and healthcare in this eye-opening episode. Host Anca Petre journeys into the heart of metaverses, tracing its inception from the times of Lucasfilm Games in 1986 to its popularization by author Neal Stephensen in 1992. But it's not just about virtual landscapes; it's about their profound potential in revolutionizing healthcare.  Join in as Michael Kaldasch, the CEO of Aimedis, delves deep into the world of Avalon - the pioneer in healthcare-focused metaverses. Discover how these virtual worlds are more than just 3D spaces, offering real-time, immersive healthcare solutions, from telemedicine to psychotherapy, while ensuring utmost privacy.  Are we standing at the brink of a healthcare evolution powered by metaverses? Tune in to find out how the fusion of technology and healthcare might just redefine patient care and bridge gaps in doctor-patient interactions.  Embark on this enlightening exploration into 'metahealth' and reimagine healthcare's future! Podcast by HealthTech for Care Production: MedShake Studio  Host: Anca Petre  Guest: Michael Kaldasch Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
08:49 07/09/2023
See you all in Season 2!
Hi, this is Anca, your host. After 8 successful episodes, season 1 of Science for Care has come to an end.  Together, we went on an exciting adventure behind the scenes of some of the most important scientific and medical breakthroughs of our time. We emerged ourselves into the fascinating stories that led to the discovery of things like mRNA vaccines, the microbiota or AI-driven surgical robots.  By our side, we had had the honor of welcoming incredible experts that helped us navigate their field. As we are preparing for Season 2, we would like to thank you for listening to our podcast and for all the positive feedback you sent us. We wish you a lovely holiday season and we will see you in 2023 with new episodes. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
01:04 14/12/2022
Mirror mirror on the wall, who’s the oldest of us all?
Is aging a disease? Or is it just the natural evolution of every human being? For how long can we extend human life? Is there a biological ceiling we will never be able to cross? These questions have fascinated mankind since the dawn of time. Some dreamt of a Fountain of Youth whose waters could render a person immortal. Others relied on incantations, prayers or to protect them from the effects of aging. But one thing remained consistent: people feared getting older. It was a sign of degradation and ultimately of death. But what exactly is aging from a biological perspective? Is it nothing more than a loss of functions? A programmed senescence? Our understanding of aging has changed dramatically because of a series of major discoveries that we will unveil in today’s episode… Those moments were nothing short of revolutionary for today’s modern medicine and science. They not only helped us better understand why we age, but they also opened the door to a new perspective: maybe, just maybe, we will one day be able to cure aging. Crazy, right? To help us better understand what is science and what is science fiction, we reached out to a specialist in this field. What you will learn in this episode: definitions Gerontology: the scientific study of old age, the process of ageing, and the particular problems of old people. It deals with the social, mental, emotional, spiritual, and physical needs of aging individuals. Geriatrics: the branch of medicine or social science dealing with the health and care of old people. It looks at the medical care surrounding aging individuals. Stress resilience: the ability to recognize and acknowledge that a situation has become difficult or painful and choose a response that leads to growth. Our cells combine aging mechanisms in various ways. Depending on this combination, they can be more or less resistant to degradation or stress. Immunotherapy: the prevention or treatment of disease with substances that stimulate the immune response. dates 1983 - a scientist named Michael Klass identified a genetic pathway that allowed worms to live longer. This discovery marked the beginning of a new era in aging research. Since then, scientists have been able to identify what they call “the 9 hallmarks of aging”. Among them are things like telomere attrition, cellular senescence or mitochondrial dysfunction. In the 2000s - scientists started identifying cancer hallmarks, a range of cellular and molecular mechanisms that triggered the disease. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
13:39 09/11/2022
Dr. AI will see you now
MYCIN. This is the name of the very first AI program developed in the medical field at Stanford University in the 1970s. Its goal was to recommend treatments to physicians for certain infectious diseases. Although this program was only live for a couple of years, it opened the door to greater innovations and breakthroughs.  Today, AI helps doctors make diagnoses, it aids surgeons in defining the “next best step” for their patients and it assists researchers when screening new drugs. But the road to a fully AI-driven healthcare system is still long and tortuous. The MYCIN program was dropped because of low acceptability by physicians and poor integration into their daily practice. Sound familiar? If it does, that’s because these challenges still exist today, over 50 years later. In today’s episode, you can expect some turbulence, because there is no such thing as disruption without some friction. Ladies and gentlemen, please take your seat, fasten your seat belts and prepare for take-off.  We have the pleasure of welcoming on the podcast James Somauroo, CEO at SomX and fellow podcast host of the HealthTech Podcast and HealthTech Pigeon. What this episode contains: AI anecdotes  Barrier to AI adoption  Evolving AI conversation  What you will learn in this episode:  Artificial intelligence was created in the 1950s One of the pioneers in this field was mathematician Alan Turing.  the “Turing test” to assess a machine’s ability to act “smart”.  The idea was for a human examiner to evaluate the discussion between a human and a machine without knowing which was which.  Two main movements emerged after the creation of the test: those advocating for a strong artificial intelligence, capable of human thinking and those advocating for a weak artificial intelligence, capable of helping humans in their tasks.  one of the first and most famous experiments regarding artificial intelligence in healthcare is SPHINX, a program designed to help doctors identify patients with jaundice, which is a yellow pigmentation of the skin in people suffering from liver conditions.  There are a growing number of applications of AI in healthcare: algorithms capable of identifying tumors on X-Rays, AI to help doctors interpret ECGs.  During Covid, AI was used by hospitals to predict the incoming flow of patients and adapt their activity. The same technology was used by governments to anticipate the number of masks or vaccines that should be ordered depending on the evolution of the situation. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
31:02 21/10/2022
Surgical robots: when science fiction becomes reality
What was once science fiction is now a reality. This pretty much sums up the history of surgical robotics. Now, before you panic, let me define what they are. Surgical robots are not living and breathing machines capable of taking medical decisions alone. That is still science fiction. The reality is that surgical robots are mechanical arms with surgical instruments attached to them that are guided by surgeons. I know, this description takes away from the fantasy. But wait until you hear about the incredible things they can do!  In today’s episode, we will explore how scientists and engineers put their imagination to work and created highly sophisticated robots capable of assisting surgeons in the OR. I will give you a couple of mind-blowing examples and you will even get to hear from a specialist in this field: Jeffery Alvarez, Chief Strategy Officer at Moon Surgical. Key concepts Robotic surgery, also called robot-assisted surgery, allows doctors to perform many types of complex procedures with more precision, flexibility and control than is possible with conventional techniques. According to UCLA Health, this type of surgery includes very small incisions and better magnification, resulting in faster recovery times and fewer risks. What are the benefits of minimally invasive surgery?  less pain and blood loss ; fewer complications, such as surgical site infection ; smaller, less noticeable scars ; shorter hospital stay and quicker recovery. What you will learn in this episode Although the word “robot” only appeared in the 20th century, the idea of robots dates all the way back to antiquity.  The Maestro is a two-armed robotic surgical assistant that can hold and manipulate standard laparoscopic instruments developed by an innovative company called Moon Surgical. Laparoscopy allows the observation of the various digestive, genital, or urinary organs. Various pathologies can be diagnosed and even treated without having to open the abdomen. Key dates  1921 - The term “robot” is used in a play published by Karel Čapek. It is derived from the Czech word, robota, which means labourer.  1985 - creation of the first surgical robot called PUMA. In the 80s: NASA engineers and Stanford surgeons came up with the idea of telepresence for surgeons.  1995 - The company Intuitive Surgical was formed. It developed the world-famous daVinci robotic surgical system. The daVinci is equipped with several arms that can replicate a surgeon’s movements with extreme precision.  Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
17:04 06/10/2022
The brilliant minds behind the microbiota revolution
How would you feel if I told you that you are not the only one that inhabits your body? Well, your body is host to anywhere from 10 to 100 trillion micro-organisms that live in symbiosis. These micro-organisms are bacteria, viruses or fungi. But not to worry, they are not the bad kind of germs that make us sick or cause pandemics. Quite the opposite! They are good, if not excellent, for your health. These micro-organisms that live inside us are called microbiota.  Scientists know today that they are essential for our bodies to work properly. They support our digestion, strengthen our immune system and can even help us combat diseases like cancer. In today’s episode, I would like to share how the human microbiota were discovered and how they are used today to help patients. I will tell you the stories of the people that greatly impacted this field and you will even get to meet one of them: Hervé Affagard, the CEO of MAAT Pharma! Buckle up, here we go. What you will learn in this episode: A bit of history 1681 & 1683 - One of the first descriptions of the micro-organisms living on and in our body came from Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 1880s - It was commonly acknowledged by the vast majority of physicians that germs cause diseases such as tuberculosis or cholera 1885 & 1886 - Theodor Escherich published a series of articles explaining in much detail, the microbiological composition of an infant’s gut and the role it could play 20th century - While Pasteur was studying pathogenic micro-organisms, one of his students, Ilya Metchnikov, decided to study the properties of the non-pathogenic bacteria found in our gut 2012 - Scientists discovered that our gut microbiota have a strong effect on our brain and our behaviour Learn more about this subject Definition of microbiota Scientists define the microbiota as : all microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes, viruses) present in a defined environment. Microbiota and microbiome : what is the difference? Although “microbiota” and “microbiome” are often interchangeable, there are certain differences between the two terms. What is the gut microbiota? The microbiota consists of a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other microorganisms present in a singular environment, such as the human digestive tract. What is the human microbiome? The microbiome refers to the entire habitat of the body, including its microorganisms, genomes, and the surrounding environmental conditions. Do you know The French Gut? It is a national contribution on microbiota. Its ambition? To map and understand the heterogeneity of healthy French gut microbiota, the factors that impact them, and their deviations in chronic diseases. By 2027, the stools of 100,000 volunteers as well as the associated nutritional and clinical data will be collected. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
13:33 21/09/2022
How reading the genome gave hope to 300 million patients
Rare diseases. The only thing really rare about them is their name! While it is true that individually, each rare disease only affects a handful of people, together, they represent 300 million individuals worldwide. That is 4% of the human population.  These 300 million people suffer from over 7.000 different diseases that are catalogued under the generic name ‘rare diseases’, simply because they have a common feature: they affect fewer than 5 in 10.000 people. But that is not the only thing these diseases have in common. Most of them are genetic, appear during childhood and are incredibly challenging to diagnose.  Did you know that it takes an average of 7 to 8 years before a diagnosis is reached? During this time, a patient’s condition can significantly deteriorate. To better understand this fascinating field, we have the pleasure of welcoming on this podcast Pr. Stanislas Lyonnet, the Director of Imagine, the Paris-based Institute of Genetic Diseases. He is also a renowned Professor of Genetics and a clinical geneticist. What you will learn in this episode:  most rare diseases have a genetic cause  gene therapy is a medical approach that treats or prevents diseases by correcting the underlying genetic problem  90% of rare diseases have no effective treatment  finding solutions for rare disease patients has become a global fight  A bit of history: 1953 - discovery of the structure of DNA 2001 - publication of the first draft of the human genome  2021 - adoption of the first UN Resolution on Addressing the Challenges of Persons with Rare Diseases and their Families by Europe’s Member States Learn more about diseases names Rare genetic disorders include:  Ehlers-Danlos syndrome AA amyloidosis Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) Usher syndrome Mitochondrial diseases What is the rarest genetic disorder? According to the Journal of Molecular Medicine, Ribose-5 phosphate isomerase deficiency, or RPI Deficinecy, is the rarest disease in the world with MRI and DNA analysis providing only one case in history. What are genetic disorders? Genes are made of DNA, which contain instructions for cell functioning and the characteristics that make every human being unique. Genetic disorders occur when a mutation affects genes or when someone has the wrong amount of genetic material. We receive half of our genes from each biological parent and may inherit a gene mutation from one parent or both. Sometimes genes change due to mutations, namely issues within the DNA. This can raise your risk of having a genetic disorder. Genetic disorders can be: chromosomal, complex, single-gene. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
18:12 07/09/2022
How a global crisis changed the way we test drugs
Back in 2019, if you had asked someone what a clinical trial is, they would probably have looked at you as if you were speaking in a foreign language. Fast forward to the post-Covid-19 era and most people not only know what a clinical trial is, but they can also likely tell you how it works: individuals, whether healthy or sick, volunteer to test a new drug in a controlled environment for a certain period of time. Before Covid, most clinical trials were conducted in hospitals, with strictly planned follow-up visits over a period of time that could stretch to several years. However, with Covid, came the need for speed and this entire model had to be rethought. This was a big headache for all those involved. We will take a look at an example of a tech-based solution that is changing the way clinical trials are performed: Cellbox. You will listen to Kathrin Adlkofer, the founder of the company, as she gives us a quick explanation of her innovation. More info Clinical trial definition A clinical trial, or clinical study, or therapeutic trial, is a scientific study conducted on human subjects with the goal of assessing the efficacy and tolerance of a treatment.  Clinical trial phases There are 3 main phases of clinical trials. Phase I Identifying treatment toxicity At this stage, the trials are mainly conducted on a limited number of healthy subjects under strict medical supervision. The molecule is tested over a short period. The objective is: - to evaluate the safety of the product, its fate in the body, its tolerance threshold; - to define the dose and frequency of administration that will be recommended for the subsequent studies. Phase II To demonstrate the efficacy of the treatment and define the optimal dose Trials are performed on 40 to 80 patients. The objective is to confirm the preliminary clinical and/or pharmacological activity of the drug at the dose recommended in Phase I. Phase III Compare the efficacy of the new drug to placebo or a reference drug if available reference drug if available Conducted on large patient populations (several hundred or thousands). These trials are very often multicentric (conducted in many study centers, hospitals). study centers, hospitals). The trials compare the therapeutic efficacy of the molecule with the reference treatment (when it exists) or to a placebo (when no therapy exists). Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio  Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
13:02 24/08/2022
When medicine discovered women’s health
We’ve all heard the expression “the weaker sex”, usually used when describing women. Well, this expression is in fact the reflection of hundreds of years during which society considered women as more fragile, more prone to sickness, and ultimately weaker. Hundreds of years during which time women’s physical and psychological health was dismissed.  The idea that women are weaker than men dates all the way back to Antiquity. At that time, women were seen as failed derivatives of men. Their body was not as strong and enduring as that of their male counterparts. This vision had a direct impact on science and medicine for centuries. In this episode, we will take you on a bumpy journey through history, into the difficulties and obstacles women faced before modern medicine finally took them into consideration. Muriel Salle, a French PhD specialist in women's history will accompany us to share her thoughts and knowledge on this topic. What you will learn in this episode The expression “the weaker sex” is then forcefully documented in medical publications. Thus considered, the nature of women makes them inherently vulnerable. And hundreds of pages are written on the female anatomy, failing by nature, and on female diseases. During the 17th and 18th centuries, symptoms such as hot flushes or dizziness were considered nervous conditions when experienced by women, who were believed to be more emotional and unable to control their feelings. When we think about feminine health issues, we think about reproductive health issues (periods, pregnancies, menopause). When we think about feminine organs, we think about the womb (uterus), ovaries, breast. But women's health is more than that. The first time we considered rethinking medicine and research based on gender was in the 80s in the US? The strong inequality in the way science and medicine approached women accumulated over the years and has left significant deficiencies in our modern health systems. The good news is that, in just a couple of years, we have come a long way in bridging the gap between the way men and women receive care. To continue these efforts, the French High Council on Equality formulated 40 recommendations along four main lines: - - Raising awareness among health care providers about the interactions between sex, gender and pathologies; - Supporting multidisciplinary research on sex and gender in health; - Taking better account of living conditions and the environment in health inequality; - And training current and future health care professionals and ensuring that women have access to positions of responsibility in the public hospital service and the research sector. More info about women’s health The health of women is influenced by sex-related biological differences, gender and other social determinants. Women's health includes a wide range of specialties and focus areas, such as: birth control, gynecology, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and other female cancers.  Women’s health & women's healthcare : facts (source : World Health Organization) Women live longer than men. Global life expectancy at birth was 74.2 years for women and 69.8 years for men in 2016.  Women experience more morbidity and use more health care services than men, particularly for their reproductive health needs.  Noncommunicable diseases continue to be the largest cause of death among women worldwide.  Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women. Among cancers, cervical and breast cancers are the most common, and lung cancer is the deadliest. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio
17:59 10/08/2022
mRNA vaccines, the story of a discovery that almost never happened
In this episode, we’ll be talking about mRNA vaccines and Dr Katalin Kariko, the great scientist behind this discovery. For many years, Dr Kariko’s work was dismissed and considered a waste of time. When she started working on mRNA, no one paid attention to her research. But of course, no one could imagine then, that one day it would help fight the biggest pandemic of our lifetimes. Dr Kariko never gave up on her obsession with mRNA, and we are oh so glad she didn’t! More info about mRNA What does mRNA stand for? Messenger ribonucleic acid. What is mRNA? What does mNRA do? A mRNA vaccine is a type of vaccine that activates the adaptive immune system using messenger RNA1 whose nucleotide sequence encodes a protein that is identical or similar to a pathogen or tumor antigen. About the mRNA vaccine mechanism How mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work? This protein is produced directly in the target cells by translation of the messenger RNA contained in the vaccine, and is recognized by the body's immune system, which responds by producing antibodies to the pathogen or cancer that is being countered. Messenger RNA can be delivered directly in solution, or encapsulated (in) lipid nanoparticles; RNA viruses are also being studied as possible vectors for RNA vaccines. This type of vaccine has some advantages over DNA vaccines in terms of production, patient delivery, and safety of use and has shown promising effects in human clinical trials. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care , a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
08:28 27/07/2022
Welcome to Science For Care!
The history of science and medicine is filled with major discoveries led by brilliant minds. Their goal ?  Anticipate and answer the most urgent needs patients have. From the discovery of DNA to the first covid-19 vaccines, men and women from all over the world worked together for the greater good.  But although the outcomes are live-chaning, the stories behind these breakthroughs are not always as bright. In this show, I take you behind the scenes of some of the most important moments in science and medicine. You will hear about the adversities, the struggles and the plots that ultimately led to the “aha moment”. The road to better patient care is sometimes a bumpy one !  Welcome to Science for Care. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio Hosted by Ausha. See ausha.co/privacy-policy for more information.
01:10 21/07/2022

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