Show cover of Science For Care

Science For Care

Science for Care unveils the stories behind some of the most important scientific and medical breakthroughs of our time. A podcast by HealthTech for Care (https://htfc-eu.com/), a non-profit organisation designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favourite listening platform. Production : MedShake Studio (https://medshake-studio.com/) 

Titres

The brilliant minds behind the microbiota revolution
How would you feel if I told you that you are not the only one that inhabits your body? Well, your body is host to anywhere from 10 to 100 trillion micro-organisms that live in symbiosis. These micro-organisms are bacteria, viruses or fungi. But not to worry, they are not the bad kind of germs that make us sick or cause pandemics. Quite the opposite! They are good, if not excellent, for your health. These micro-organisms that live inside us are called microbiota.  Scientists know today that they are essential for our bodies to work properly. They support our digestion, strengthen our immune system and can even help us combat diseases like cancer. In today’s episode, I would like to share how the human microbiota were discovered and how they are used today to help patients. I will tell you the stories of the people that greatly impacted this field and you will even get to meet one of them: Hervé Affagard, the CEO of MAAT Pharma! Buckle up, here we go. What you will learn in this episode: A bit of history 1681 & 1683 - One of the first descriptions of the micro-organisms living on and in our body came from Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 1880s - It was commonly acknowledged by the vast majority of physicians that germs cause diseases such as tuberculosis or cholera 1885 & 1886 - Theodor Escherich published a series of articles explaining in much detail, the microbiological composition of an infant’s gut and the role it could play 20th century - While Pasteur was studying pathogenic micro-organisms, one of his students, Ilya Metchnikov, decided to study the properties of the non-pathogenic bacteria found in our gut 2012 - Scientists discovered that our gut microbiota have a strong effect on our brain and our behaviour Learn more about this subject Definition of microbiota Scientists define the microbiota as : all microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes, viruses) present in a defined environment. Microbiota and microbiome : what is the difference? Although “microbiota” and “microbiome” are often interchangeable, there are certain differences between the two terms. What is the gut microbiota? The microbiota consists of a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other microorganisms present in a singular environment, such as the human digestive tract. What is the human microbiome? The microbiome refers to the entire habitat of the body, including its microorganisms, genomes, and the surrounding environmental conditions. Do you know The French Gut? It is a national contribution on microbiota. Its ambition? To map and understand the heterogeneity of healthy French gut microbiota, the factors that impact them, and their deviations in chronic diseases. By 2027, the stools of 100,000 volunteers as well as the associated nutritional and clinical data will be collected. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio 
13:33 21/09/2022
How reading the genome gave hope to 300 million patients
Rare diseases. The only thing really rare about them is their name! While it is true that individually, each rare disease only affects a handful of people, together, they represent 300 million individuals worldwide. That is 4% of the human population.  These 300 million people suffer from over 7.000 different diseases that are catalogued under the generic name ‘rare diseases’, simply because they have a common feature: they affect fewer than 5 in 10.000 people. But that is not the only thing these diseases have in common. Most of them are genetic, appear during childhood and are incredibly challenging to diagnose.  Did you know that it takes an average of 7 to 8 years before a diagnosis is reached? During this time, a patient’s condition can significantly deteriorate. To better understand this fascinating field, we have the pleasure of welcoming on this podcast Pr. Stanislas Lyonnet, the Director of Imagine, the Paris-based Institute of Genetic Diseases. He is also a renowned Professor of Genetics and a clinical geneticist. What you will learn in this episode:  most rare diseases have a genetic cause  gene therapy is a medical approach that treats or prevents diseases by correcting the underlying genetic problem  90% of rare diseases have no effective treatment  finding solutions for rare disease patients has become a global fight  A bit of history: 1953 - discovery of the structure of DNA 2001 - publication of the first draft of the human genome  2021 - adoption of the first UN Resolution on Addressing the Challenges of Persons with Rare Diseases and their Families by Europe’s Member States Learn more about diseases names Rare genetic disorders include:  Ehlers-Danlos syndrome AA amyloidosis Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) Usher syndrome Mitochondrial diseases What is the rarest genetic disorder? According to the Journal of Molecular Medicine, Ribose-5 phosphate isomerase deficiency, or RPI Deficinecy, is the rarest disease in the world with MRI and DNA analysis providing only one case in history. What are genetic disorders? Genes are made of DNA, which contain instructions for cell functioning and the characteristics that make every human being unique. Genetic disorders occur when a mutation affects genes or when someone has the wrong amount of genetic material. We receive half of our genes from each biological parent and may inherit a gene mutation from one parent or both. Sometimes genes change due to mutations, namely issues within the DNA. This can raise your risk of having a genetic disorder. Genetic disorders can be: chromosomal, complex, single-gene. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio 
18:12 07/09/2022
How a global crisis changed the way we test drugs
Back in 2019, if you had asked someone what a clinical trial is, they would probably have looked at you as if you were speaking in a foreign language. Fast forward to the post-Covid-19 era and most people not only know what a clinical trial is, but they can also likely tell you how it works: individuals, whether healthy or sick, volunteer to test a new drug in a controlled environment for a certain period of time. Before Covid, most clinical trials were conducted in hospitals, with strictly planned follow-up visits over a period of time that could stretch to several years. However, with Covid, came the need for speed and this entire model had to be rethought. This was a big headache for all those involved. We will take a look at an example of a tech-based solution that is changing the way clinical trials are performed: Cellbox. You will listen to Kathrin Adlkofer, the founder of the company, as she gives us a quick explanation of her innovation. More info Clinical trial definition A clinical trial, or clinical study, or therapeutic trial, is a scientific study conducted on human subjects with the goal of assessing the efficacy and tolerance of a treatment.  Clinical trial phases There are 3 main phases of clinical trials. Phase I Identifying treatment toxicity At this stage, the trials are mainly conducted on a limited number of healthy subjects under strict medical supervision. The molecule is tested over a short period. The objective is: - to evaluate the safety of the product, its fate in the body, its tolerance threshold; - to define the dose and frequency of administration that will be recommended for the subsequent studies. Phase II To demonstrate the efficacy of the treatment and define the optimal dose Trials are performed on 40 to 80 patients. The objective is to confirm the preliminary clinical and/or pharmacological activity of the drug at the dose recommended in Phase I. Phase III Compare the efficacy of the new drug to placebo or a reference drug if available reference drug if available Conducted on large patient populations (several hundred or thousands). These trials are very often multicentric (conducted in many study centers, hospitals). study centers, hospitals). The trials compare the therapeutic efficacy of the molecule with the reference treatment (when it exists) or to a placebo (when no therapy exists). Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio 
13:02 24/08/2022
When medicine discovered women’s health
We’ve all heard the expression “the weaker sex”, usually used when describing women. Well, this expression is in fact the reflection of hundreds of years during which society considered women as more fragile, more prone to sickness, and ultimately weaker. Hundreds of years during which time women’s physical and psychological health was dismissed.  The idea that women are weaker than men dates all the way back to Antiquity. At that time, women were seen as failed derivatives of men. Their body was not as strong and enduring as that of their male counterparts. This vision had a direct impact on science and medicine for centuries. In this episode, we will take you on a bumpy journey through history, into the difficulties and obstacles women faced before modern medicine finally took them into consideration. Muriel Salle, a French PhD specialist in women's history will accompany us to share her thoughts and knowledge on this topic. What you will learn in this episode The expression “the weaker sex” is then forcefully documented in medical publications. Thus considered, the nature of women makes them inherently vulnerable. And hundreds of pages are written on the female anatomy, failing by nature, and on female diseases. During the 17th and 18th centuries, symptoms such as hot flushes or dizziness were considered nervous conditions when experienced by women, who were believed to be more emotional and unable to control their feelings. When we think about feminine health issues, we think about reproductive health issues (periods, pregnancies, menopause). When we think about feminine organs, we think about the womb (uterus), ovaries, breast. But women's health is more than that. The first time we considered rethinking medicine and research based on gender was in the 80s in the US? The strong inequality in the way science and medicine approached women accumulated over the years and has left significant deficiencies in our modern health systems. The good news is that, in just a couple of years, we have come a long way in bridging the gap between the way men and women receive care. To continue these efforts, the French High Council on Equality formulated 40 recommendations along four main lines: - - Raising awareness among health care providers about the interactions between sex, gender and pathologies; - Supporting multidisciplinary research on sex and gender in health; - Taking better account of living conditions and the environment in health inequality; - And training current and future health care professionals and ensuring that women have access to positions of responsibility in the public hospital service and the research sector. More info about women’s health The health of women is influenced by sex-related biological differences, gender and other social determinants. Women's health includes a wide range of specialties and focus areas, such as: birth control, gynecology, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and other female cancers.  Women’s health & women's healthcare : facts (source : World Health Organization) Women live longer than men. Global life expectancy at birth was 74.2 years for women and 69.8 years for men in 2016.  Women experience more morbidity and use more health care services than men, particularly for their reproductive health needs.  Noncommunicable diseases continue to be the largest cause of death among women worldwide.  Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women. Among cancers, cervical and breast cancers are the most common, and lung cancer is the deadliest. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio
17:59 10/08/2022
mRNA vaccines, the story of a discovery that almost never happened
In this episode, we’ll be talking about mRNA vaccines and Dr Katalin Kariko, the great scientist behind this discovery. For many years, Dr Kariko’s work was dismissed and considered a waste of time. When she started working on mRNA, no one paid attention to her research. But of course, no one could imagine then, that one day it would help fight the biggest pandemic of our lifetimes. Dr Kariko never gave up on her obsession with mRNA, and we are oh so glad she didn’t! More info about mRNA What does mRNA stand for? Messenger ribonucleic acid. What is mRNA? What does mNRA do? A mRNA vaccine is a type of vaccine that activates the adaptive immune system using messenger RNA1 whose nucleotide sequence encodes a protein that is identical or similar to a pathogen or tumor antigen. About the mRNA vaccine mechanism How mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work? This protein is produced directly in the target cells by translation of the messenger RNA contained in the vaccine, and is recognized by the body's immune system, which responds by producing antibodies to the pathogen or cancer that is being countered. Messenger RNA can be delivered directly in solution, or encapsulated (in) lipid nanoparticles; RNA viruses are also being studied as possible vectors for RNA vaccines. This type of vaccine has some advantages over DNA vaccines in terms of production, patient delivery, and safety of use and has shown promising effects in human clinical trials. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care , a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio
08:28 27/07/2022
Welcome to Science For Care!
The history of science and medicine is filled with major discoveries led by brilliant minds. Their goal ?  Anticipate and answer the most urgent needs patients have. From the discovery of DNA to the first covid-19 vaccines, men and women from all over the world worked together for the greater good.  But although the outcomes are live-chaning, the stories behind these breakthroughs are not always as bright. In this show, I take you behind the scenes of some of the most important moments in science and medicine. You will hear about the adversities, the struggles and the plots that ultimately led to the “aha moment”. The road to better patient care is sometimes a bumpy one !  Welcome to Science for Care. Science for Care is a podcast by HealthTech for Care, a non profit organization designed to support and promote access to care for all. If you enjoy our show, please mention it to your friends, family and co-workers, and leave ratings and reviews on your favorite listening platform. Production: MedShake Studio 
01:10 21/07/2022