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The Economist Podcasts

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

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The World Ahead: The coming recession
What are the prospects for the world economy in 2023? Economies face volatile energy prices and inflation at its highest level in decades. The Economist's economics editor, Henry Curr, and deputy business affairs editor, Rachana Shanbhogue, explain the dilemma facing central bankers around the world. Also, what are the global effects of a strong dollar and high American interest rates?We hope you enjoy listening to this podcast as much as we enjoy making it. We're always thinking of ways to improve and to do that we would like to know more about our listeners. Please help us by filling out this short questionnaire. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
19:29 05/12/22
The for-sixty-dollar question: a cap on Russian oil
Shippers and insurers of Russian crude are now subject to a $60-per-barrel price cap. That may spark Russian production cuts—or an oil-market realignment that undercuts the cap. Senegal might be out of the World Cup, but a visit to its football-academy machinery reveals why it will continue to create star players. And why it’s harder to get deodorant in Manhattan.Help us make the show better: take our listener survey at http://economist.com/intelligencesurveyFor full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22:44 05/12/22
Editor’s Picks: December 4th 2022
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Xi Jinping’s zero-covid policy, why trustbusters should let Microsoft buy Activision Blizzard (11:44) and why emigration is in the air for Britons (16:38).To help us improve our podcasts, please fill out this short questionnaire: economist.com/epsurveyPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25:12 04/12/22
Checks and Balance: Sitting ducks
Politicians have returned to Washington following the Thanksgiving break, for what Democrats hope will be a legislative flurry. Once Republicans take over the House in January, passing bills will get a lot harder. What can, and should, the lame-duck session of the 117th Congress accomplish?   Senator Angus King tells us why reforming a law from 1887 is at the top of his to-do list. We go back to a particularly productive lame-duck session. And The Economist’s James Bennet makes the case that Congress should act to protect those who grew up undocumented in America.John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. We are always trying to improve our podcasts for our listeners. To help, please complete this short survey: economist.com/uspodsurvey You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
39:37 02/12/22
In sofa as I can recall: troubles for Cyril Ramaphosa
South Africa’s leader says a pile of cash stashed in a sofa represents no wrongdoing. The outcome of an investigation could be the undoing of his presidency and his party. We examine Britain’s hydrogen-economy plans as representing the tradeoffs that many countries will face. And remembering Jay Pasachoff, the world’s foremost expert on and exponent of eclipses.Help us make the show better: take our listener survey at http://economist.com/intelligencesurveyFor full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
27:23 02/12/22
The Economist Asks: Will Germany succeed in transforming its foreign policy?
Days after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Olaf Scholz, the German chancellor, announced a radical shift in the country’s foreign and security policy. Host Anne McElvoy asks Christoph Heusgen, a former advisor to Angela Merkel, whether the Zeitenwende (“turning point”) will be delivered or derailed. The veteran diplomat, who now chairs the Munich Security Conference, also assesses Germany’s China policy and how to mend fences with European allies.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastofferWe're constantly thinking about how we can make better podcasts for our listeners. To help us do that, please fill out this short questionnaire: economist.com/economistaskssurvey Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22:37 01/12/22
Square dealing: Jiang Zemin dies
The Chinese leader who took over a squabbling party following the Tiananmen Square massacre surprised the world by stifling dissent, overseeing a staggering economic awakening—and occasionally breaking into song. We examine the lessons to be drawn from his legacy. After scores of failures, a new Alzheimer’s treatment shows real promise. And our annual ranking of the world’s most expensive cities.Help us make the show better: take our listener survey at http://economist.com/intelligencesurvey. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25:37 01/12/22
Money Talks: The new rules of investment
High inflation, amid warnings of a global recession, is forcing investors to tear up the rule book. Since the financial crisis, bonds have been seen as a safe bet—even if they did not promise much of a return. Equity markets, led by soaring tech stocks, were where fortunes were made. Both have plunged this year. In a world where rising interest rates have left governments worrying about how to afford their debts, and companies will struggle to raise cash, investors need new strategies.On this week’s podcast, hosts Alice Fulwood, Soumaya Keynes and Mike Bird ask what those new rules of investing look like. Wei Li, global chief investment strategist for the world’s biggest investor, BlackRock, argues this new macroeconomic era is here to stay. And Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic adviser to Allianz, says investors need to focus on picking winners within stocks and bonds.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
39:03 30/11/22
On the Horn’s dilemma: meeting Somalia’s president
The Horn of Africa’s resurgent jihadists of al-Shabab pose the biggest problem to Hassan Sheikh Mohamud. He tells us his plans—political, economic and principally ideological—to calm tensions. Western pilots have been training their Chinese counterparts, to widespread consternation. And looking back on the best footballers never to have appeared in a World Cup.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28:10 30/11/22
Babbage: How to cure type-1 diabetes
A new drug for type-1 diabetes has been licensed in America. Teplizumab is the first treatment for the condition since insulin began being used a century ago. It targets one of the root causes of this type of diabetes and can slow the onset of the disease. Better still, the drug could be the herald of a new era in treating the condition.Colin Dayan, a professor of clinical diabetes and metabolism at Cardiff University, tells “Babbage” producer Jason Hosken why immunotherapy could be a game-changing innovation for diabetes. Beth Baldwin and Harj Singh share personal stories of how the condition has affected their families. And Sanjoy Dutta, chief scientific officer of diabetes research charity JDRF, explains the potential pathways to finding a cure. Alok Jha hosts.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions, subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
41:39 29/11/22
The French connection: Macron’s state visit to America
Behind the pageantry, Presidents Joe Biden and Emmanuel Macron will have much to chew over, from a unified response in Ukraine to tricky trade negotiations. Our modelling suggests that Russia’s weaponisation of energy might ultimately kill more people than its efforts on the battlefield will. And a Ghanaian brewer’s struggles reveal the difficulty of business-building in sub-Saharan Africa.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23:47 29/11/22
Drum Tower: Control pique
Protests in cities across China show there is real anger over the zero-covid policy and the party's intrusion into every corner of people's lives. A neighbourhood surveillance system is mobilising people to police one another. Could public unrest threaten Xi Jinping’s plans for total control? The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, hear from somebody who has lived through street-level surveillance in China's most tightly policed region of Xinjiang. Sign up to our weekly newsletter here. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
37:33 28/11/22
The World Ahead 2023: Conflicting possibilities
How will the war in Ukraine play out in 2023? The Economist’s foreign and defence editors discuss the possible scenarios for the conflict with Russia. The best one for Ukraine is also the most dangerous. Tom Standage hostsPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
21:57 28/11/22
Patience zero: China’s remarkable unrest
Protests have become as bold as they are widespread—mostly against the country’s unsustainable zero-covid policies, but increasingly against the ruling regime itself. California’s wildfires have been growing more intense, and a new analysis shows just how much those blazes undo the good work of the state’s green policies. And a look at the evolution of the Great British Lad.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25:24 28/11/22
Editor’s Picks: November 27th 2022
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Europe’s crisis of energy and geopolitics, how crypto goes to zero (10:19) and the consequences of America’s success against organised crime (16:32)  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25:06 27/11/22
Checks and Balance: From our archive—beef encounter
At Thanksgiving Americans express gratitude for family, the harvest… and a big, juicy turkey.  Americans consume the most meat per person, but that's not good for the planet. In an episode first released in November 2021, we ask: could they cut back? The Economist’s Jon Fasman and his sons prepare the Thanksgiving turkey. We go back to a nationwide contest to find the perfect chicken. And Caroline Bushnell from The Good Food Institute discusses how to wean Americans off meat.   John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard.You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
40:12 25/11/22
Forgoing a song: protest inside and beyond Iran
Players’ refusal to sing their national anthem at the World Cup has brought their country’s protests onto the global stage. We ask whether the discontent back home threatens the regime. A sober look at global economic data reveals a probable global recession—one that may not even tame raging inflation. And remembering Hebe de Bonafini, Argentina’s icon of resistance.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28:30 25/11/22
The Economist Asks: How could Ukraine win the war?
Ben Hodges, a former commanding general of US Army Europe, believes that Ukraine has achieved “an irreversible momentum” since the liberation of Kherson. He predicts the country could declare victory against Russia by the summer. Host Anne McElvoy asks him how Ukraine could pull it off. He assesses whether Western countries will hold their nerve as the conflict drags on and what could happen if Vladimir Putin loses on the battlefield.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28:53 24/11/22
Scar from the madding crowd: Korea probes a tragedy
Grief about the deaths of more than 150 people in a crush has turned to anger, and the investigation into what actions were taken—or not taken—has turned political. Our correspondent looks into the vast effort to remake the car industry as automobiles turn into software platforms on wheels. And how Britain’s twee National Trust has waded into the culture wars. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26:18 24/11/22
Money Talks: Why it’s time to talk about Indonesia
Indonesia is the world’s third-largest producer of coal. Not only does it power the country, it powers the economy. But the country’s president, Joko Widodo, wants to change that. Indonesia is garnering global attention due to its stock of nickel and cobalt, core elements in the batteries needed for the booming electric vehicle industry. Can the government swap the fossil-fuel-powered economy to one that runs on batteries instead?On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood ask whether Indonesia can really go green. Zanny Minton Beddoes, The Economist’s editor-in-chief, sits down with Joko Widodo to find out if he is the man to wean the country off coal. Finance minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati and education minister Nadiem Makarim tell us how to train a generation of battery-makers. And Patrick Foulis, our business-affairs editor, warns of a red flag.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
38:36 23/11/22
A whole other kettle of fission: Ukraine’s imperilled nuclear plant
The power station in Zaporizhia has served as an impromptu military base for Russian forces—but danger is mounting and there are signs that troops may soon give it up. The sportswear-industry boom that has much of the world wearing high-performance kit may soon come to an end. And why teenage angst is such a good fit for horror films. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
23:53 23/11/22
Babbage at COP27: Part four—“Africa’s COP” concludes
COP27 was an arduous summit, with mixed results. A landmark agreement to create a new “loss and damage” fund was a historic achievement. But many delegates were disappointed by the lack of progress on decarbonising energy systems. In the final episode of our series, we explore what the final deal means for the future of climate action. Plus, we examine AFR100, a project that aims to pair climate action with economic growth in Africa.The Economist’s Rachel Dobbs reports on the gruelling final hours of negotiations at COP27. Ani Dasgupta of the World Resources Institute explains how the AFR100 project combines agriculture, technology and clever financing to capture carbon in Africa. And Mamadou Diakhite of the African Union Development Agency describes the impact the initiative is having on communities.Alok Jha hosts with Catherine Brahic, The Economist’s environment editor, and Vijay Vaitheeswaran, our global energy and climate innovation editor.Listen to our mini-series at economist.com/COP27pod and follow all of The Economist’s climate coverage at economist.com/climate-change.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions, subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
37:52 22/11/22
Ploy story: a defenestration at Disney
Executives have squeezed out Bob Chapek and re-anointed Bob Iger as boss. But the firm’s woes are less about leadership and more about the new economics of Hollywood. We ask why Zimbabwe’s teen mothers find it so hard to stay in school, and what can be done about it. And pigs prove their intelligence, again, by making up after confrontations.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferRuntime: 22 min Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22:41 22/11/22
Drum Tower: Better than a punch in the face
Xi Jinping and Joe Biden met face-to-face for their first time as national leaders. Both men spoke about feeling the eyes of the world on them. What does the world need from this relationship? The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, talk to Wang Yong of Peking University and Daniel Russell, a former adviser to President Obama who has been in the room with Mr Xi and Mr Biden. The Economist’s Banyan columnist Dominic Zeigler analyses how their relationship impacts South-East Asia.Sign up to our weekly newsletter here. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
36:10 21/11/22
Damage collateral: a tide turns at COP27
An issue ignored for three decades came to dominate the summit’s agenda: reparations to poor countries for climate-driven “loss and damage”. Alas, halting those coming losses did not feature much. Our correspondent speaks with a Ukrainian fighter pilot about defending the country’s airspace using mostly Soviet-era kit. And why some words sound the same across many languages.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
28:13 21/11/22
Editor’s Picks: November 20th 2022
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, is this the end of crypto? Also, why Indonesia matters (11:00) and Glenn Youngkin’s unique approach to Trumpism (19:40) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26:38 20/11/22
Checks and Balance: Trump's back
As Donald Trump launches a third White House run, we report on the view from Mar-a-Lago and the rise of Ron DeSantis. Are attempted presidential comebacks ever a good idea? And how will a fractured Republican Party navigate the long road to 2024?The Economist’s Alexandra Suich Bass dissects Mr Trump’s announcement speech. We revisit Herbert Hoover’s hopes for a return to Pennsylvania Avenue. And Russell Vought of the Center for Renewing America explains why he’s backing Mr Trump.  John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
42:01 18/11/22
In come taxes: Britain’s austere economic plan
The “Autumn statement” was filled with belt-tightening, from stealthy tax rises to public-service cuts. But perhaps the bitterest part of the pill has been left for the next government to swallow. As the World Cup begins in Qatar, controversies over preparedness and human rights threaten to overshadow what happens on the pitch. And New York City declares war on rats. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
22:12 18/11/22
The Economist Asks: Will the clean-energy transition be fast enough?
As the end of COP27 nears, US energy secretary Jennifer Granholm talks to Anne McElvoy from the climate summit in Egypt. They discuss the impact the global energy crisis is having on Joe Biden’s green agenda, whether the hype around hydrogen will endure and if the president is willing to put aside a tussle with China for the sake of climate cooperation. Plus, Vijay Vaitheesawaran, The Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, measures the ambitions declared at COP27 against what is achievable.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
26:58 17/11/22
Musketeers heading for the exits: chaos at Twitter
Elon Musk gave Twitter’s remaining staff an ultimatum: commit to “working long hours at high intensity” for “hardcore” Twitter, or leave. We evaluate his reign so far. Under President Daniel Ortega, Nicaragua has become a one-party state. And remembering the long life of Anne Frank’s best friend. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
25:48 17/11/22