Show cover of Politics of COVID-19 Podcast - The Syllabus

Politics of COVID-19 Podcast - The Syllabus

A curated playlist of the best new podcasts on the unfolding coronavirus crisis. The focus will be on the political, economic and social ramifications of COVID-19. Powered by The Syllabus. For more information: the-syllabus.com

Tracks

BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with William Haseltine
Podcast: Distillations | Science History Institute (LS 42 · TOP 1.5% what is this?)Episode: BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with William HaseltinePub date: 2020-05-28We talk to William Haseltine, a scientist, entrepreneur, and author who has lived through three epidemics (polio, HIV/AIDS, and now COVID-19). He tells us how his lab in the 1980s was better prepared to deal with HIV/AIDS than we are now for COVID-19 and what he thinks lies ahead for us with this pandemic.   Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. Credits Hosts: Elisabeth Berry Drago, Alexis Pedrick  Senior Producer: Mariel Carr Producer: Rigoberto Hernandez Researcher: Jessica Wade Audio Engineer: Jonathan Pfeffer​​​​​​​The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Science History Institute, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
28:30 06/15/2020
COVID-19 Gathers Force in Middle East
Podcast: Order From Ashes (LS 24 · TOP 10% what is this?)Episode: COVID-19 Gathers Force in Middle EastPub date: 2020-06-09At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, displaced populations and conflict zones were considered especially vulnerable, driving early fears that the Middle East would be especially hard hit. The first wave of the pandemic shook Iraq and Iran, but the worst fears did not materialize, at least not initially.  Now, however, cases are increasing across the region. The pandemic is straining areas already buckling under sanctions, armed conflict, regional rivalries, corruption, and economic depression. On this episode of Order from Ashes, international affairs researchers at The Century Foundation discuss how the pandemic is accelerating regional crises and why it has not yet led to any systemic change. (There’s more TCF analysis of the pandemic in the Middle East in the new roundtable, “Middle East Strained by COVID-19, But Not Transformed.”) Participants include: Dina Esfandiary, fellow, The Century Foundation Michael Wahid Hanna, senior fellow, The Century Foundation Aron Lund, fellow, The Century Foundation Thanassis Cambanis, senior fellow, The Century Foundation The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Century International, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
42:59 06/15/2020
Race and COVID
Podcast: Big Picture Science (LS 57 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)Episode: Race and COVIDPub date: 2020-06-08While citizens take to the streets to protest racist violence, the pandemic has its own brutal inequities. Black, Latino, and Native American people are bearing the brunt of COVID illness and death. We look at the multitude of factors that contribute to this disparity, most of which existed long before the pandemic. Also, how the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe maintained their coronavirus safeguards in defiance of the South Dakota governor. And, the biological reasons why we categorize one another by skin color.Guests: Marcella Nunez Smith – Associate Professor of Medicine and of Epidemiology, Yale School of Medicine, Director, Equity Research and Innovation Center Utibe Essien – Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and a Core Investigator, Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System Nina Jablonski – Anthropologist, paleobiologist at Pennsylvania State University and author of, “Skin: A Natural History,” and “Living Color: the Biological and Social Meaning of Skin Color.”  Robert Sapolsky – Professor of neuroscience at Stanford University, and author of “Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst.” Harold Frazier – Chairman of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe, South Dakota. The Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation COVID checkpoint on Highway 212 is featured in an article on Indianz.com.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesThe podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from SETI Institute, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
54:00 06/15/2020
Stephen Hough on Practicing Through the Pandemic, Composing, and Classical Music as Entertainment.
Podcast: Sticky Notes: The Classical Music Podcast (LS 60 · TOP 0.1% what is this?)Episode: Stephen Hough on Practicing Through the Pandemic, Composing, and Classical Music as Entertainment.Pub date: 2020-06-08First, I want to let my listeners know that Thursday will begin a new commitment to exploring the works of minority composers. It's long past time to begin doing that. For today, please enjoy this thoughtful and deeply entertaining conversation with the great pianist, composer, and writer Stephen Hough. Hough is one of the great pianists of our time and is also a deep thinker about classical music of yesterday and today. I had so much fun with this conversation, recorded about three weeks ago. Enjoy!The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Weilerstein, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
45:16 06/15/2020
Coronavirus: The Whole Story - How do we reimagine the future?
Podcast: UCL Minds (LS 32 · TOP 5% what is this?)Episode: Coronavirus: The Whole Story - How do we reimagine the future?Pub date: 2020-06-08Future earth, future tech, future health In this special edition, made for the Cheltenham Science Festival at Home, we’re exploring what the future will look like post-COVID-19. Vivienne Parry speaks with UCL experts as they discuss the future, providing a unique insight into how the pandemic affects how we reimagine the climate debate, helpful technologies, and public health. Special guests: Prof Mark Maslin (Professor of Physical Geography) Dr Jack Stilgoe (Senior Lecturer in Science & Technology Studies) Prof Deenan Pillay (Professor of Virology) Access the transcript and more information on: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ucl-minds/podcasts/coronavirus-whole-storyThe podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from UCL, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
45:23 06/15/2020
Pandemic & Protest
Podcast: What Next | Daily News and Analysis (LS 61 · TOP 0.1% what is this?)Episode: Pandemic & ProtestPub date: 2020-06-08It is entirely possible to support the protests while feeling intense anxiety that they will result in additional cases of COVID-19. Guest: Dr. Howard Markel, professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and author of When Germs Travel, among other books. Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesThe podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Slate Podcasts, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
24:33 06/15/2020
Episode #11 with Ludovic Voet, migrant workers and COVID19, trade unions in action
Podcast: etui.podcastEpisode: Episode #11 with Ludovic Voet, migrant workers and COVID19, trade unions in actionPub date: 2020-06-08In this episode we talk with Ludovic Voet, Confederal Secretary of the European Trade Union Confederation (www.etuc.org) about the overlooked theme in this current health crisis, which is the migration and refugee crisis and the role trade unions in Europe are playing.  All migrant workers, and particularly the undocumented, are among the least protected. This was true before the crisis, but the health and economic crisis, has acerbated inequalities. We’ve seen some positive reactions to protect and include migrants in Portugal, where the government has said that it will Grant Migrants and Asylum Seekers Full Citizenship Rights During COVID-19 Outbreak and also the case of Italy, where there is a proposal to regularise migrant workers working in the food and agricultural sector. (https://www.etuc.org/en/document/overlooked-migrant-workers-covid-19-crisis) The www.unionmigrantnet.eu portal offers services and information in different languages, and real-time advice from experts. The network also provides a forum for cross-border exchange of best practice. For more information on the European Commission proposal on a new pact for Asylum and Migration, due to release later this year (2020) https://www.europarl.europa.eu/legislative-train/theme-promoting-our-european-way-of-life/file-a-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/etui/messageThe podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from ETUI, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
19:53 06/15/2020
Biowarfare – can it tell us anything about the corona virus?
Podcast: Rear Vision — How History Shaped Today (LS 54 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)Episode: Biowarfare – can it tell us anything about the corona virus?Pub date: 2020-06-07The US suggestion that the corona virus came from a Chinese lab - although unsupported by any evidence - prompts the story of our experiments with biological weapons.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from ABC Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
29:05 06/15/2020
Gael Giraud: Will COVID Lead to Authoritarianism?
Podcast: Economics & Beyond with Rob Johnson (LS 40 · TOP 1.5% what is this?)Episode: Gael Giraud: Will COVID Lead to Authoritarianism?Pub date: 2020-06-04Gael Giraud, founder and leader of the Georgetown University Center for Environmental Justice, talks to Rob Johnson about how liberal democracies will fare in facing the pandemic, whether we could see a rise in authoritarian governments, and why economics needs to take climate change into account.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET), which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
58:32 06/15/2020
Kevin Rudd on China's place in a post-pandemic world
Podcast: Ear to Asia (LS 35 · TOP 2.5% what is this?)Episode: Kevin Rudd on China's place in a post-pandemic worldPub date: 2020-06-04Special guest former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd joins host Ali Moore to discuss a post COVID-19 world marked by an increasingly assertive China and anaemic US leadership. Will growing Sino-American tensions result in a new cold war? And what’s the future for the global institutions responsible for maintaining world order? Kevin Rudd is President of the Asia Society Policy Institute and a China watcher of more than four decades. An Asia Institute podcast. Produced and edited by Profactual - the Podcasting Specialists. Music by audionautix.com.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Asia Institute, The University of Melbourne, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
58:07 06/15/2020
The Response to COVID-19 in South Asia
Podcast: The Mittal Institute, Harvard UniversityEpisode: The Response to COVID-19 in South AsiaPub date: 2020-06-04How has COVID-19 impacted South Asia? Throughout the spring and summer, the Mittal Institute is bringing together Harvard faculty and in-region experts to discuss the various interdisciplinary issues that have arisen in South Asia in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. From the science of the virus to the impact on education, you can learn how COVID-19 will change South Asia's societies. Both full-length podcasts and clips will be available here.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from The Mittal Institute, Harvard University, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
58:39 06/15/2020
COVID-19 and Refugees with Manish Agrawal
Podcast: Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs (LS 43 · TOP 1% what is this?)Episode: COVID-19 and Refugees with Manish AgrawalPub date: 2020-06-03COVID-19 and Refugees with Manish Agrawal In this episode of the Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs, we discuss COVID-19’s effect on refugees. Refugees and displaced persons, are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19. Many live in densely populated camps with minimal sanitation. The Kutupalong refugee settlement in Bangladesh – the world’s largest refugee camp – saw its … Continue reading COVID-19 and Refugees with Manish AgrawalThe podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
38:22 06/15/2020
The Urban - Rural Divide in the COVID-19 Responses
Podcast: The African TrumpetEpisode: The Urban - Rural Divide in the COVID-19 ResponsesPub date: 2020-06-02For years public health suffered as clinical health flourished because clinical medicine is much easier to marketize, privatize and monetize. Now COVID is demanding a public health response through auditing the social construction of health, disease, economics, rural-urban life, and human relations; basically the kind of stuff that can't privatize, commoditize or privatize easily. A conversation between Madina Wa Chege and Darius Okolla.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from by The Elephant, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
17:51 06/15/2020
Life After Lockdown, and the Politics of Blaming China
Podcast: The New Yorker Radio Hour (LS 68 · TOP 0.05% what is this?)Episode: Life After Lockdown, and the Politics of Blaming ChinaPub date: 2020-05-29Since January, Peter Hessler has reported from China under quarantine. Now, as restrictions lift, he tells David Remnick about his return to normal life; recently, he even went to a dance club. But, although China’s stringent containment measures were effective enough to allow a rapid reopening, one scientist told Hessler, “There is no long-term plan. There’s no country that has a long term plan.” Back in Washington, Evan Osnos explains how blaming China for its sluggish response—and insisting that it cost lives worldwide—has become a touchstone of the Presidential race in America. The candidates have found a rare moment of agreement that it is time to get tough on China, and that their opponent is weak. The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from WNYC Studios and The New Yorker, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
21:16 06/15/2020
The Covid-19 Crisis and the Art Institutions
Podcast: Suite (212) (LS 36 · TOP 2.5% what is this?)Episode: The Covid-19 Crisis and the Art InstitutionsPub date: 2020-05-30The Covid-19 crisis has caused unprecedented challenges for the art world. The lockdown has blown a hole in the finances of large metropolitan institutions and smaller provincial galleries alike, with knock-on effects for staff and artists. It is causing arts organisations to rethink their relationships with local communities and with the internet, and to consider how exhibitions and other functions might work in the age of social distancing, with a likely fall in visitors and revenue when they eventually decide to reopen. Joining Juliet to discuss this are Stefan Kalmár, Director of the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London, and Helen Stalker, CEO and Director of the Turnpike Gallery in Leigh, Lancashire. They talked about the origins of the two institutions in the age of cultural democracy, and how they navigated the challenges of austerity and Brexit; their funding models, and expectations of what might change in the wake of the 2019 General Election; how they handled lockdown, including when and why they closed, how they managed their staff and artists, and how much support they’ve received from the Arts Council and elsewhere; when they might reopen, how they might deal with social distancing, how this might change their practice, and whether any crisis-induced changes might be for the good. A full list of references for the programme, with links, can be found via our Patreon at www.patreon.com/suite212, and are available to $3 subscribers.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Suite (212), which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
76:47 06/15/2020
Episode 43: The Coronavirus Pandemic: How is the pandemic shifting labour-capital relations?
Podcast: India Speak: The CPR Podcast (LS 25 · TOP 10% what is this?)Episode: Episode 43: The Coronavirus Pandemic: How is the pandemic shifting labour-capital relations?Pub date: 2020-06-01In episode 43 of ThoughtSpace, Yamini Aiyar, President & Chief Executive of CPR, speaks with Dr K R Shyam Sundar, one of India's leading researchers on labour laws, and professor at the Xavier Institute of Management, Jamshedpur. In a bid to revive the economy in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, several state governments issued ordinances with respect to labour reforms that have further skewed the dynamics of labour-capital relations in India. These reforms have come under significant scrutiny and some steps have been taken to address the more draconian ones, but these debates have put a spotlight on some of the big questions that need to be addressed around the framing of labour-capital relations. Dr Sundar takes us on a journey of the evolution of labour laws in India, discusses flaws inherent in them and how they fail to protect the most vulnerable of workers, and what the current reforms could mean for the future of labour-capital relations in the country. This is the eleventh episode in a series by the Centre for Policy Research on the unfolding coronavirus pandemic in India. You can follow the Centre’s work on Covid-19 on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CPR_India or visit www.cprindia.org/covid-19. You can listen to all the episodes in the Coronavirus Conversation series here: https://scroll.in/topic/56263/coronavirus-conversations.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Centre for Policy Research (CPR), which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
73:12 06/15/2020
Brazil’s Covid chaos
Podcast: The Science Hour (LS 54 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)Episode: Brazil’s Covid chaosPub date: 2020-05-31The number of cases of Covid -19 infections in Brazil and deaths related to the pandemic may be much higher than official figures show. Testing of the living is not widespread and there are few resources for analysing the potential role of the virus as a cause of death. Virologist Fernando Spiliki gives us his bleak assessment. A remarkable study from South Africa shows just how easily the virus can spread around a hospital, with a single infected person infecting many. However the route of infection is not necessarily direct person to person transmission says investigator Richard Lessells from the University of KwaZulu Natal. And from London a study in a hospital with many Covid patients at the height of the pandemic supports the South African findings; Researchers found viral particles on surfaces and in the air says Professor Wendy Barclay from Imperial College. An early warning system for outbreaks of the virus or second waves may come from analysis of sewage, Jordan Peccia from Yale University analysed waste from his local sewage treatment works and found peaks in concentrations of the virus in the sludge occurred a few days before increases in hospital admissions. (Image: Supporters of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro wear face masks as they demonstrate against quarantine and social distancing measures imposed by governors and mayors to combat the new coronavirus outbreak and demand military intervention. Also this week, The kids take over. Our younger listeners are as curious as their parents, it seems, so presenter Marnie Chesterton seeks out the finest minds and attempts to answer a raft of their science questions, including why can’t you tickle yourself? Why don’t our eyebrows grow as long as the hair on our heads? Not content with humankind, these whizz kids have been pondering deeply about other animals. Ava, 9, from the UK wants to know if any other animals kill for fun, like some humans do. Not limited by planet Earth, these little thinkers have been contemplating even weightier questions. Joshua, 13, from Kenya wonders if our Solar System rotates around anything. And Seattle-based Michael, 10, puzzles over what would happen if a black hole collided with a wormhole. These and other mysteries are uncovered by Marnie and her experts. Credit: SERGIO LIMA/AFP via Getty Images)The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from BBC World Service, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
77:47 06/15/2020
Comprendre le monde S3#27 - Sylvie Matelly - "L'économie mondiale après le Covid-19"
Podcast: Comprendre le monde (LS 43 · TOP 1% what is this?)Episode: Comprendre le monde S3#27 - Sylvie Matelly - "L'économie mondiale après le Covid-19"Pub date: 2020-05-27Reprise du podcast "Comprendre le monde" après interruption suite au Covid-19. Pascal Boniface reçoit aujourd'hui Sylvie Matelly, économiste et directrice adjointe de l'IRIS. Le thème abordé cette semaine : "L'économie mondiale après le Covid-19" L'émission est disponible sur Soundcloud, Spotify, l'app Podcast, I-Tunes, Youtube, le site internet de l'IRIS, Mediapart et le blog de Pascal Boniface.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Pascal Boniface, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
25:55 06/15/2020
Episode 113 - Lockdown: Decoding the Covid Complex
Podcast: This Jungian Life Podcast (LS 58 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)Episode: Episode 113 - Lockdown: Decoding the Covid ComplexPub date: 2020-05-28Oppressed, repressed and regressed, the forced restrictions of the Covid Complex have us in its grip. We may see friends and family more often than ever, but only on a screen. Work, school, home, weekdays, weekends—time and tasks slide around like Jello on a hot plate. Loss of structure, variety, movement and touch are destabilizing. Confined to tight physical and emotional spaces, we may collapse into ourselves or lash out at loved ones. We hear contradictory messages on the news and go outside only if masked and defended. The Covid Complex is both personal and collective—it affects each of us differently and it affects us all. Most of us have been forced inward physically and psychologically; perhaps this time is also an opportunity to rediscover inner resources and experience depth of being.   Dream I am viewing media footage filmed from a helicopter looking down onto the forward section of a fast moving 60 foot solo sailed yacht that is heading out to sea. The yacht is hard to the wind, heeled over, plunging through a 1.5 meter sea, with ocean spray sweeping over the bow. The sky is overcast, the sea grey, the wind is blowing over 25 knots and the land is out of sight and astern. A man (solo sailor) of approximately 70 years, dressed in yellow wet weather gear, is steadily making his way aft from the bow of the yacht toward the stern. He is moving in a crouch using a hand for support in an experienced and careful manner. As he moves he is also tending to the headsail that is temporarily impaired by the life lines; he is caring in his attention to the sail. A news commentator is wishing the sailor well as he embarks on a long offshore passage. I am yearning that this will one day be me embarking on such a passage and I am empathizing with the harmony that the sailor is demonstrating toward the yacht by smoothing the sail and his experienced movements in challenging conditions. Suddenly the sailor looks up toward the stern and breaks into a run, toward the stern. However, his foot catches on a fixed piece of rigging and he trips, falling forward, hitting his head hard on the deck. The news commentator is saying that this is the last time the sailor was seen or heard from and is now missing at sea. I am thinking how could it be the last time he was seen as there were people recording the footage and flying the helicopter. I can’t understand how he could be missing. I wake up feeling shaken and bewildered.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joseph Lee, Lisa Marchiano, & Deb Stewart, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
62:07 05/31/2020
#88 Triple shock in the global south - oil, debt, and Covid-19 w/ Adam Hanieh
Podcast: Politics Theory Other (LS 49 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)Episode: #88 Triple shock in the global south - oil, debt, and Covid-19 w/ Adam HaniehPub date: 2020-05-28Adam Hanieh joins me to talk about the challenges Covid-19 and the debt crisis pose to countries in the global south, how western economic and military intervention has undermined state capacity needed to combat the pandemic, and finally we discussed Adam's argument that the crisis may paradoxically be in certain respects beneficial for the oil majors and the richest oil producing countries - in spite of last month's collapse in oil prices. Our conversation was prompted by two articles by Adam for the Verso books blog: This is a Global Pandemic – Let’s Treat it as Such https://www.versobooks.com/blogs/4623-this-is-a-global-pandemic-let-s-treat-it-as-such When Oil Markets Go Viral https://www.versobooks.com/blogs/4651-when-oil-markets-go-viralThe podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Politics Theory Other, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
26:22 05/31/2020
Prof. Joseph Stiglitz - The Economic Policy Options for Fixing the COVID-19 Downturn
Podcast: The African TrumpetEpisode: Prof. Joseph Stiglitz - The Economic Policy Options for Fixing the COVID-19 DownturnPub date: 2020-05-28This pandemic is an economically unique trouble in that it has affected both demand and supply while notoriously failing to respond to the usual fiscal and monetary options. The international policy cooperation is the shorter route out of this. However, as Dr Ndii and Dr Stiglitz discuss, an immediate downturn is all but inevitable before the global world picks up again.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from by The Elephant, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
41:15 05/31/2020
72. AITC: Inequities and Political Urgencies with Mark Wigley
Podcast: ArchitectureTalk (LS 36 · TOP 2.5% what is this?)Episode: 72. AITC: Inequities and Political Urgencies with Mark WigleyPub date: 2020-05-27  This week we continue our ongoing miniseries Architecture in the Time of Coronavirus with guest Mark Wigley, Professor and Dean Emeritus at Columbia GSAPP. In this episode, we dissect how the Corona virus reinforces social inequities, how it changes the ways in which we communicate, what it means to live in a city during a pandemic, and what the role of the architect is in these uncertain conditions.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Vikram Prakash, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
62:05 05/31/2020
Asia's Recovery from COVID-19: The Role of the Asian Development Bank.
Podcast: GDP - The Global Development Primer (LS 27 · TOP 10% what is this?)Episode: Asia's Recovery from COVID-19: The Role of the Asian Development Bank.Pub date: 2020-05-26The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic cannot be under-estimated for  Asia  - the world's largest developing region.  The social and economic impacts of COVID-19 for those living below the poverty line in Asia and the Pacific will be substantial.  So what are development actors doing about it?  In this episode of GDP,  we're happy to have Bart Édes joining us to talk about the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and how this regional development bank is planning to address the post-pandemic development challenges in Asia & the Pacific.    Bart W. Édes has served as the Asian Development Bank’s (ADB’s) Representative in North America since October 2, 2017. In this capacity, he mobilizes financing for ADB’s developing member countries; shares development knowledge and experience; establishes and deepens partnerships with public, private and nonprofit organizations in North America; and raises public awareness of ADB in Canada and the United States. Mr. Édes has also worked as a journalist, researcher, policy analyst, and specialist on international trade and foreign direct investment He has a Master’s Degree in Public Policy from the University of Michigan, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Government (cum laude) from Georgetown University. Follow Dr. Bob on Twitter:  @ProfessorHuishThe podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Robert Huish, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
31:27 05/31/2020
Racial and Economic Inequality From the Great Migration to Covid-19
Podcast: Policy Punchline (LS 33 · TOP 3% what is this?)Episode: Racial and Economic Inequality From the Great Migration to Covid-19Pub date: 2020-05-25Many studies have come out suggesting a disproportionate burden of illness and death among racial and ethnic minority groups during this Covid-19 crisis. And certainly one cannot attribute this phenomenon simply to the virus itself, but much due to the underlying structural fractures of the American society in its treatment of racial and ethnic minorities for years and decades. In this interview, Dr. Ellora Derenoncourt of UC Berkley and Princeton provides a detailed historical analysis on racial and economic inequality since the days of the Great Migration and discusses possible post-Covid policy measures to address those critical concerns. Her fascinating research on the Great Migration shows that the beautiful idea of "moving to opportunity" for black families no longer holds true, as the Great Migration cities have typically responded to the influx of black migrants with increasing segregation and spending on policing. The dynamic response from local residents and governments paint a gloomy picture on whether migration can actually lead to better outcomes for black households. We also dive deep into another strand of her research – the effect of federal minimum wage on the black-white earnings gap. Because many minorities work retail jobs, the increase in minimum wage might simply encourage employers to adopt automation and replace the workers. Therefore, the adoption of minimum wage may further incentivize companies to automate away jobs and increase the racial earnings gap. Lastly, Ellora talks about how WWII is analogous to our current crisis, as consumer production was also slowed to benefit the war effort then, similar to the current economic freeze. What policy prescriptions should we yield from this analysis? Is it safe to expect a post-pandemic boom similar to that of the postwar era? Is this analogy complicated by the fact that there is no war effort toward which we are redirecting economic output that could serve to stimulate the economy? We discuss how the government can incorporate racial and social considerations when enacting fiscal policies and the wider impacts of our decisions today on inequality. Ellora Derenoncourt is an incoming assistant professor in the Department of Economics and the Goldman School of Public Policy at University of California, Berkeley. Her research interests lie in labor economics, economic history, and inequality.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Princeton University, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
42:24 05/31/2020
India’s fiscal response to Covid-19
Podcast: ODI live events podcast (LS 23 · TOP 10% what is this?)Episode: India’s fiscal response to Covid-19Pub date: 2020-05-26India’s federal government has taken a cautious approach in response to the social and economic impacts of the coronavirus crisis. The initial fiscal support provided was equivalent to just 0.8% of GDP – despite millions of workers losing their jobs since the lockdown has been put in place. More recently, Prime Minister Modi has promised a much larger economic stimulus package, although there seems to be limited direct grants or subsidies available. This stands in contrast to the much larger fiscal support packages being put in place by governments around the world. Yet is ‘doing whatever it takes’ a realistic option in India? The crisis comes at a time when the economy was already weakening, and the government is unable to rely upon the central banks to refinance debts denominated in foreign currency. How then should the government steer a course between providing relief from the crisis and concerns for the stability of the macroeconomy? This is a joint event co-hosted by ODI, the National Institute for Public Finance and Policy and the Centre for Policy Research.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Overseas Development Institute, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
63:49 05/31/2020
#5 Borders after the pandemic
Podcast: The Borders of Equality PodcastEpisode: #5 Borders after the pandemicPub date: 2020-05-27All around the world, governments are coming up with new technologies to control and monitor the spread of the coronavirus. Controlling the spread of the covid has created an ever expanding demand for data on citizens. What does this mean for democracy and civil liberties? Does this need for data mean a shrinkage of individual rights? Are we witnessing the same rise of state control as after 9/11? Our guest is Matt Longo. Matt is the author of the Politics of Borders (Cambridge University Press). Matt has written extensively on borders, security and human rights after 9/11.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Alexandre Afonso, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
67:21 05/31/2020
Recode Decode: Phil Howard and Emily Bell
Podcast: Decoder with Nilay Patel (LS 67 · TOP 0.05% what is this?)Episode: Recode Decode: Phil Howard and Emily BellPub date: 2020-05-27Phil Howard, the Oxford Internet Institute director and author of Lie Machines, and Emily Bell, the director of Columbia University's Tow Center for Digital Journalism, talk with Recode's Kara Swisher about the state of disinformation and propaganda in the coronavirus pandemic and how what we're hearing this year compares to the state-organized propaganda that infected elections in 2016. They explain some of the most pervasive conspiracy theories and campaigns — including the untruthful documentary-style movie "Plandemic," how Bill Gates replaced George Soros as the leading right-wing boogeyman, and President Trump's amorphous "Obamagate" insinuations. Bell and Howard also talk about why these lies are spreading so effectively, the celebrities and influencers that are helping them along, and how the big tech platforms are faring in the face of this challenge. Plus: How Facebook built "misinformation factories" in its apps.Featuring:Emily Bell (@emilybell), director, Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia's Graduate School of JournalismPhil Howard (@pnhoward), director, Oxford Internet Institute and author, Lie Machines.Host:Kara Swisher (@karaswisher), Recode co-founder and editor-at-largeMore to explore:On Reset, Arielle Duhaime-Ross explores why — and how — tech is changing everything.On Recode Media, Peter Kafka interviews business titans, journalists, comedians and podcasters about the collision of tech and media.On Pivot, Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway talk about the big tech news stories of the week, who's winning, who's failing, and what comes next.And on Land of the Giants, Jason Del Rey chronicled the rise of Amazon. Season 2 will focus on Netflix and is coming soon!About Recode by Vox:Recode by Vox helps you understand how tech is changing the world — and changing us.Follow Us:Newsletter: Recode DailyTwitter: @Recode and @voxdotcom Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoicesThe podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from The Verge, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
62:39 05/31/2020
Joseph Stiglitz on a Post-COVID-19 Economy
Podcast: Big Tech (LS 38 · TOP 2% what is this?)Episode: Joseph Stiglitz on a Post-COVID-19 EconomyPub date: 2020-05-21The impact of COVID-19 on the global economy was swift and substantial. Unemployment numbers are reaching depression-era levels and nations are clamouring to unveil stability packages intended to lessen the economic impact. Will these measures work to restore the economic status quo, or is this an opportunity to rethink our economic structures? In this episode of Big Tech, co-hosts David Skok and Taylor Owen speak with Joseph Stiglitz, a Nobel laureate economist and a professor at Columbia University, about lessons from past economic crises, and how those lessons apply to the economic fallout of COVID-19. This time around, tech companies command much of the market, and many of them are experiencing stability, if not growth. Zoom and Netflix, for example, have seen surges in their share price. Unfortunately, the tech industry introduces new labour-market issues: digital platforms often require fewer employees to operate than other industries like manufacturing or air travel. With comparatively small staff numbers, tax breaks and growing monopolies, technology companies have an outsize effect on society. Stiglitz argues that taxing these companies in “an adequate way” could have a positive social impact. “The fact is: we lowered the corporate taxes rather than trying to capture back for the public some of the enormous profits that are accruing to the tech giants,” he explains. These companies could emerge from the pandemic more dominant than ever.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Centre for International Governance Innovation, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
21:35 05/31/2020
Why the market fails in a crisis (with Joseph Stiglitz)
Podcast: Pitchfork Economics with Nick Hanauer (LS 58 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)Episode: Why the market fails in a crisis (with Joseph Stiglitz)Pub date: 2020-05-19One of the central theories of classical economics is that markets respond quickly and efficiently to changes in demand. But the pandemic clearly demonstrates that the markets aren’t the efficient adapters that classic economists believe them to be. Nobel laureate economist Joseph Stiglitz explains why the tendency to believe in the market is one of the most deeply rooted trickle-down myths, and why government intervention is the best way forward through this economic downturn. Joseph Stiglitz is a Nobel laureate economist and a professor at Columbia University. He is also the co-chair of the High-Level Expert Group on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress at the OECD, and the Chief Economist of the Roosevelt Institute. In 2011, Stiglitz was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Known for his pioneering work on asymmetric information, Stiglitz focuses on income distribution, risk, corporate governance, public policy, macroeconomics, and globalization. His most recent book, People, Power, and Profits, was just released in paperback. Twitter: @JosephEStiglitzFurther reading: People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent: https://www.indiebound.org/book/9781324004219Four Priorities for Pandemic Relief Efforts: https://rooseveltinstitute.org/four-priorities-for-covid19-pandemic-relief-efforts/Why Our Affluent Society Is Facing Shortages in the Face of the Coronavirus Pandemic: https://time.com/5811505/affluent-society-shortages-coronavirus-pandemic/Deficit Lessons for the Pandemic From the 2008 Crisis: https://prospect.org/economy/deficit-lessons-pandemic-2008-crisis/How the Economy Will Look After the Coronavirus Pandemic: https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/04/15/how-the-economy-will-look-after-the-coronavirus-pandemic/Top economist: US coronavirus response is like ‘third world’ country: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/apr/22/top-economist-us-coronavirus-response-like-third-world-country-joseph-stiglitz-donald-trumpWebsite: http://pitchforkeconomics.com/Twitter: @PitchforkEconInstagram: @pitchforkeconomicsNick’s twitter: @NickHanauerThe podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Civic Ventures, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
41:04 05/31/2020
The Disenfranchiser: Donald Trump’s Attack on Voting Rights and the Threat to Native Sovereignty
Podcast: Intercepted (LS 69 · TOP 0.05% what is this?)Episode: The Disenfranchiser: Donald Trump’s Attack on Voting Rights and the Threat to Native SovereigntyPub date: 2020-05-27The modern Republican Party has mastered the art of voter suppression and gerrymandering, but the president is now seeking to exploit the pandemic to aid these efforts. In between tweets accusing Joe Scarborough of being involved with the death of an intern decades ago and spending time on the golf course as the U.S. neared 100,000 coronavirus deaths, Trump has offered an overwhelmingly fictional narrative about Democratic voter fraud punctuated by warnings of the election being illegitimate before a single vote has been cast. Mother Jones senior reporter Ari Berman, author of "Give Us The Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America," analyzes the strategy of Trump and the GOP and lays out what he considers the nightmare scenario for the November election. As Trump continues to downplay the human toll of Covid-19, he is doubling down on his push for states to quickly reopen. Many of the states that have reopened surround Indian country and the Chairman of the Hopi Tribe reservation says, “we have a wildfire burning around us.” Journalist Rebecca Nagle, host of the podcast This Land, discusses how the coronavirus is disproportionately impacting native communities, explains some major cases before the U.S. Supreme Court on indigenous land rights, and talks about Trump’s battles against native tribes. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from The Intercept, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.
69:14 05/31/2020