Show cover of The Discipline and Punish Podcast

The Discipline and Punish Podcast

Interviews with academics and experts who work on issues related to the U.S. criminal justice system. Host Thomas Baker is a PhD student in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. He is a former police officer who studies police culture and police use of force. Thomas is a U.S. Army veteran and a 2018 Pat Tillman Scholar award winner.

Tracks

#28 FATAL ENCOUNTERS – Documenting Police Related Deaths in the U.S. – Brian Burghart
On this episode, Brian Burghart and I discuss his work to document every police related deaths in the U.S. since the year 2000. We talk about the lack of a comprehensive government run national database, why he came to create Fatal Encounters, what was required to create it, how it’s managed, and the future of the database.From www.fatalencounters.org:Hi, my name is D. Brian Burghart. I’m a lifelong, award-winning journalist. I’ve got two master’s degrees–one in English writing and one in journalism. I’m the former editor/publisher of the Reno News & Review and a former journalism instructor at the University of Nevada, Reno. These days, I’m founder and executive director of Fatal Encounters Dot Org and a part-time researcher for the University of Southern California.I’m based in Reno, Nevada, but I’m currently traveling and seeing how far I can push Verizon’s Unlimited limits. I’ve created this page because I believe in a democracy, citizens should be able to figure out how many people are killed during interactions with law enforcement, why they were killed, and whether training and policies can be modified to decrease the number of officer-involved deaths.Fatal Encounters intends to help create a database of all deaths through police interaction in the United States since Jan. 1, 2000. We are not a finished product. We’re just the first step toward creating an impartial, comprehensive and searchable national database of people killed during interactions with police. We expect other media organizations, law enforcement, universities, artists and activist groups will advance our work, and that’s why we let anyone use the data for any reason for free.This site will remain as impartial and data-driven as possible, directed by the theory that Americans should be able to answer some simple questions about the use of deadly force by police: How many people are killed in interactions with law enforcement in the United States of America? Are they increasing? What do those people look like? Can policies and training be modified to have fewer officer-involved shootings and improve outcomes and safety for both officers and citizens?Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. Support the show
74:07 09/27/2020
#27 POLICE VIOLENCE AND BLACK CHILDREN – The psychological costs and implications – Ashley N. Jackson
www.thomasowenbaker.com for podcasts, LIVE streams, writing, and more.In this episode, Ashley N. Jackson from Washington University-St. Louis and I discuss the psychological impacts of police violence on adolescent Black boys. We talk about the history of race in the U.S., how it intersects police violence, "the talk", and Jackson's research.About Ashley N. Jackson:https://sites.wustl.edu/ajackson/In 2009, I earned a BS in Administration of Justice from George Mason University and an AM (MSW) from the University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration in 2011. During the 2017-2018 cycle, I earned a Fulbright Research grant to conduct research in Cali, Colombia where I explored how local NGOs support vulnerable communities impacted by armed conflict and violence.Prior to moving to Colombia, I worked at the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) and the Vera Institute of Justice (Vera) in New York in program development, advocacy and research on a variety of criminal justice issues. Specifically, I provided support to communities across the country addressing public safety issues. I also conducted mixed-methods research on youth experiences while incarcerated and during their transition back into the community and the impact of police contact on  youth and families in New York City.I currently study historical and contemporary patterns of police violence, its effects on psychological well-being and racial socialization among communities of color.I love cats, traveling (when we could!), and baking.Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods.Article Discussed:Jackson, A. N., Butler-Barnes, S. T., Stafford, J. D., Robinson, H., & Allen, P. C. (2020). “Can I Live”: Black American Adolescent Boys’ Reports of Police Abuse and the Role of Religiosity on Mental Health. International journal of environmental research and public health, 17(12), 4330.https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/12/4330?type=check_update&version=1&fbclid=IwAR1jFFVTBy07sy6RIR0vB2-zxL9SDr-etLt8rkF15B4qeihXO3y0h_l3TikAbstract:"State sanctioned violence aimed at Black individuals and communities is an issue that has pervaded American history and society since before the establishment of the United States. For Black males, anticipating and preparing for involuntary police contact, unfortunately, is an inevitable part of life. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of reports of police abuse on mental health and perceived racial out-group perceptions and the protective role of religiosity among a nationally representative sample of Black American adolescent boys (Mage = 14.98). Linear multiple regression was used to determine the interactive effects of subjective religiosity and reported police abuse on Black American adolescent boys. Higher reports of subjective religiosity were associated with lower depressive symptomatology. Reports of police abuse were associated with lower public regard beliefs (belief that society views Black Americans less favorably). Results highlight the impact experiencing police abuse has on Black adolescent boys and we conclude with implications, areas for future research and intervention points." Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)
73:05 09/21/2020
#26 DEFUND THE POLICE – What Does The End of Policing Look Like? – Alex Vitale
www.thomasowenbaker.comIn this episode, Professor Alex Vitale from Brooklyn College and I discuss his book The End of Policing. We talk about the current crisis and how the use of policing as a form of social control can be reduced in the U.S. We talk about the drug war, the mental health crisis, deindustrialization, and automated driving technology. http://www.alex-vitale.info/Alex S. Vitale is Professor of Sociology and Coordinator of the Policing and Social Justice Project at Brooklyn College and a Visiting Professor at London Southbank University. He has spent the last 30 years writing about policing and consults both police departments and human rights organizations internationally. Prof. Vitale is the author of City of Disorder: How the Quality of Life Campaign Transformed New York Politics and The End of Policing. His academic writings on policing have appeared in Policing and Society, Police Practice and Research, Mobilization, and Contemporary Sociology. He is also a frequent essayist, whose writings have been published in The NY Times, Washington Post, The Guardian, The Nation, Vice News, Fortune, and USA Today. He has also appeared on CNN, MSNBC, CNBC, NPR, PBS, Democracy Now, and The Daily Show with Trevor Noah.Book discussed:The End of Policing. New York and London: Verso. 2017. Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)
44:58 09/07/2020
#25 THE FUZZY LINE BETWEEN WAR AND POLICING – Where does one end and the other begin – Green Beret Logan Leslie
On this episode, Green Beret, Tillman Scholar, and Harvard Law graduate Logan Leslie and I discuss the fuzzy line between domestic law enforcement and the military. We talk about the veteran experience and how the Global War on Terrorism influences U.S. policing. We also discuss how to control police use of force and also touch on his recent experience working the protests in Atlanta with his National Guard unit. Per the Tillman Foundation:Logan Leslie is an honors graduate of Harvard College and has served for over 12 years in the United States Army as a scout and as a Special Forces Combat Diver. Enlisting on his 17th birthday, Logan has over 26 months of combat experience in Iraq and Afghanistan. Currently, a JD/MBA student at Harvard, Logan is a Tillman Scholar, an InSITE entrepreneurship fellow, and the founder and co-president of the Free Enterprise Club at the Harvard Business School. While a student, Logan spent summers at the private equity firm Crestview Partners, Hedge Fund Solutions at the Blackstone Group, and at the Boston Consulting Group. He continues to serve as a Special Forces team member in the Army National Guard.Passionate about veterans’ education issues, Logan has volunteered extensively to help enlisted veterans achieve academic excellence in order to continue to serve their communities after leaving the military. Logan currently resides in Cambridge, Massachusetts with his alluring wife, two enchanting daughters, and one unruly puppy.He also created a venture capital firm dedicated to empowering veterans:https://www.nrockusa.com/Support the show
108:55 08/31/2020
#24 BODY OF THE CONQUISTADOR – Early European Social Control in the Americas – Professor Rebecca Earle
Please visit thomasowenbaker.com for more podcasts, videos, streams, and writing.On this episode, Professor Rebecca Earle and I discuss early forms of social control in the Americas. Professor Earle studies the history of food and focuses on the Spanish conquest. She describes what “policing” might have looked like in 1492 and how the diets of European and Native populations were used as a tool of statecraft. We also discuss the creation of race during the early conquest and how we are living with those consequences today.   Get the book discussed:https://www.amazon.com/Body-Conquistador-Experience-1492-1700-Perspectives-ebook/dp/B0089NUPV4Description from Amazon:“This fascinating history explores the dynamic relationship between overseas colonisation and the bodily experience of eating. It reveals the importance of food to the colonial project in Spanish America and reconceptualises the role of European colonial expansion in shaping the emergence of ideas of race during the Age of Discovery. Rebecca Earle shows that anxieties about food were fundamental to Spanish understandings of the new environment they inhabited and their interactions with the native populations of the New World. Settlers wondered whether Europeans could eat New World food, whether Indians could eat European food and what would happen to each if they did. By taking seriously their ideas about food we gain a richer understanding of how settlers understood the physical experience of colonialism and of how they thought about one of the central features of the colonial project. The result is simultaneously a history of food, colonialism and race.”From Professor Earle’s Faculty Page:https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/history/people/staff_index/earle/“I am a historian of food, and of the cultural history of Spanish America and early modern Europe. I am interested in how ordinary, every-day cultural practices such as eating or dressing, or even using postage stamps, shape how we think about the world. My early work was rooted in a very specific part of the world (southern Colombia). These days I tend to study the movement of ideas and practices across larger geographies.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)
54:32 08/24/2020
#23 PSYCHOLOGICAL OPERATIONS IN THE AGE OF BLACK LIVES MATTER – With former PSYOP’s soldier - Rick Schumacher
Please visit thomasowenbaker.com for more podcasts, videos, streams, and writing.Check out https://www.schumachercg.com/ for information regarding Rick’s consultant work. On this episode, former psychological operations soldier Rick Schumacher and I discuss his path into the military, the recent deployment of federal officers to U.S. cities, as well as the use of PSYOPS and propaganda during the recent national uprisings. We also discuss the rules of engagement followed by soldiers in war zones and how those rules compare to the procedures followed by domestic police. We finish by discussing police training, the future of the BLM movement, and the importance of civil institutions such as the Tillman Foundation.Per the Tillman Foundation Website:“Rick enlisted in the US Army while still in high school, with a need to take control of his own future. As a Psychological Operations Specialist, he learned quickly the importance of being a servant-leader. Over 11 years of service as a cross-cultural communicator, he saw parts of the world ravaged by war, poverty, and disaster. These experiences instilled in him the need to do more to protect and serve the neediest among us, domestically as well as internationally. Working as a criminal investigator since leaving the military in 2004, a degree in Criminal Justice seemed like a natural progression for Rick. During his degree program, and is his subsequent graduate education, Rick has studied the interrelation between poverty, social vulnerability, criminality, and disaster risk.    As a Tillman Scholar, Rick continues to work on projects that reduce social vulnerability in struggling populations. Currently serving as a compliance officer in a multi-national corporation, Rick hopes to look after the rights of under-served manufacturing workers in Africa, South America, the Middle East, Asia, and India.”Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. what are psychological operations, how to use psychological operations, who uses psychological operations, how to train psychological operations, psychological operations in the united states, what is a psyop, black lives matter psyop, federal police officer deployment, seattle protests, Portland protests, chaz, chop, Atlanta policeSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)
87:35 08/10/2020
#22 UTOPIAN DREAMING INSIDE SEATTLE’S CHAZ - A Marine combat correspondent reports – Ethan E. Rocke
Please visit thomasowenbaker.com for more podcasts, videos, streams, and writing.Check out coffeeordie.com to see Ethan’s recent work.On this episode, Coffee or Die senior editor Ethan Rocke and I discuss his recent trip to the Capital Hill Autonomous Zone (CHAZ) in Seattle. We also talk about his experiences as a Marine combat correspondent, the social division currently facing the U.S., his recent conversation with General James Mattis, and how we can move forward as a country.Bio: Ethan E. Rocke is a senior editor for Coffee or Die. Born in Los Angeles and raised in California’s Sierra Nevada foothills, he is a New York Times bestselling author and award-winning photographer and filmmaker in Portland, Oregon. He served as an infantryman with the U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne Division, deploying once to Kosovo for peacekeeping operations. After leaving the Army, he joined the U.S. Marine Corps as a “storyteller of Marines,” serving in Okinawa and the Asia-Pacific region with III Marine Expeditionary Force and at the Marine Corps Motion Picture and Television Liaison Office in Los Angeles, where he served as a consultant on dozens of television shows and documentaries and several feature films. His work has been published in Maxim Magazine, American Legion Magazine and many others. He is co-author of “The Last Punisher: A SEAL Team THREE Sniper’s True Account of the Battle of Ramadi.” Reach Ethan:Twitter @EthanRockeFacebook @eerockeWebsite: https://ethanrockemedia.com/ Ethan’s Piece on CHAZ:https://coffeeordie.com/chop-autonomous-zone-essay/ Ethan’s video footage of the sheriff mentioned:https://coffeeordie.com/sheriff-swanson-flint-michigan/?fbclid=IwAR0g6e0JczVnRd_cvClkmlr0cvGhZVJuT_qYQdF0rMNiQ91ROjYnSURHPrs Ethan’s article “Commitment Issues”:https://www.legion.org/magazine/230217/commitment-issues?fbclid=IwAR28157FRjFdUPessezuxv-ff-7pi50hcx4iYg8EMiMb1KUJQANPrk0xiUYTom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. what is the capitol hill autonomous zone,what should they do about chaz,what should the police do about chaz,how should we respond to chaz,chaz and bundy ranch,how to handle chaz,what should we do about antifa,what is antifa,how to manage chaz,seattle,chaz,autonomous zone,protests,george floyd,seattle autonomous zone,police,black lives matter,black lives matter type beat,seattle police,chaz seattle,police shooting,george floyd breakdownSupport the show
132:04 07/17/2020
#21 THE AGONY and the ECSTASY OF #METOO - Finding justice following a sex crime - Guy Hamilton-Smith
Please visit www.thomasowenbaker.com for more podcasts, videos, streams, and writing.On this episode, Guy Hamilton-Smith and I discuss sex crimes, his experience as a victim and an offender, the origins of the #metoo movement, how the U.S. manages sex related offenses, obstacles to achieving justice for victims of sex crimes, and how to improve the system. Bio: Hamilton-Smith advocates for better mechanisms of accountability in our society. Victims are often and easily forgotten and neglected by our justice system. To compensate, the state offers more punishment as opposed to holding more wrongdoers to account. Such a bargain has not seen more accountability for those who cause harm, nor more equity for victims, but only a relatively unchecked expansion of state authority which has been purchased with a disregard for constitutional principles and human rights. While perhaps most would be fine with such a sacrifice if it meant we built safer communities, evidence indicates that this is not the case.Reach Guy:Twitter @G_PadraicWebsite: https://guyhamiltonsmith.com/ Article Discussed:Hamilton-Smith, G. (2020). The Agony & the Ecstasy of# MeToo: The Hidden Costs of Reliance on Carceral Politics. Sw. L. Rev., 49, 93. Abstract:Many have considered the conversation sparked by #MeToo as a necessary and overdue interrogation of not only the spectre of common sexual harms in American society, but also the inadequacy of traditional mechanisms of accountability. Against this backdrop, smaller-scale flashpoints have erupted over perceived inadequacy of punishment, such as the successful campaign to recall California judge Aaron Persky from the bench over what many saw as leniency in the widely-publicized case of People v. Turner. This paper analyzes the complex relationship between #MeToo and the carceral state. In arguably the most punitive nation on the planet— particularly when considering the breadth and scope of public post- conviction registries—I argue that seeking to address broad and systemic failures of accountability by advocating for more severe punishment paradoxically undermines the larger goals of #MetToo to the extent that those goals are concerned with effectively challenging systems that perpetuate sexual harms. An approach that harmonizes efforts to prevent sexual harms and bring those who cause harm to account without endorsement of carceral politics is explored.Link to article: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/338194844_The_Agony_The_Ecstasy_Of_Metoo_The_Hidden_Costs_Of_Reliance_On_Carceral_PoliticsTom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods.  Support the show
79:29 07/15/2020
#20 - FROM THE BATTLEFIELD TO THE BOOKSHELF – EXPLORING POLICE FICTION – Terry Weaver Jr.
FROM THE BATTLEFIELD TO THE BOOKSHELF – EXPLORING POLICE FICTION – Terry Weaver Jr. Ep. 20On this episode, Terry Weaver and I discuss his book A Dark Day in Texas. We talk about the Pat Tillman Foundation, his time as a Navy Corpsman, and the role those experiences have played in shaping the police fiction he creates. Terry grew up in the Mountain View Trailerpark in San Bernardino California, a suburb of Los Angeles. His childhood was tough, so at 16 years old he left home.At 17, Terry graduated In 1999 and enlisted in the U.S. Navy as a Corpsman. He was deployed as a combat medic with the U.S. Marines and served a tour of duty in Kuwait and Iraq from 2002 to 2003. After five years of active duty, Terry received an honorable discharge.He attended Mays Business School at Texas A&M and received the Pat Tillman Foundation Scholarship established in the namesake of Army Ranger and NFL star player Pat Tillman who was killed in action. Terry earned a Bachelor of Business Administration and then spent ten years in various sales and marketing roles.In 2014, Terry founded VEL INSTITUTE, a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit with a mission to “Connect and Develop Veterans, Entrepreneurs, and Leaders through collaborative learning.” In 2017, Terry moved into a full-time role as the executive director of VEL INSTITUTE.In 2019, Terry was selected as a lead actor in the forthcoming TV series, Breaking Strongholds, being filmed in Montgomery, Texas.Reach Terry:https://www.facebook.com/terryweaverofficial/https://www.linkedin.com/in/terryweaverjr/https://terryweaverbooks.com/https://www.velinstitute.org/Books Discussed:A Dark Day in Texas by Terry Weaverhttps://www.amazon.com/Dark-Day-Texas-Terry-Weaver/dp/1733090223/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=a+dark+day+in+texas&qid=1593649848&sr=8-1The Evolution of a Leader by Terry Weaverhttps://www.amazon.com/Evolution-Leader-Terry-Weaver/dp/1733090207/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=evolution+of+a+leader+terry+weaver&qid=1593649731&sr=8-1The Television Series Discussed:https://www.breakingstrongholds.com/Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.htmlSupport the show
55:40 07/07/2020
#18 - HOW DO POLICE LEARN TO DEFEND THEMSELVES? – Exploring the state of police defensive tactics – Professor Jeremy Butler
On this episode, Professor Butler and I discuss his research, his negative experience with police as a Black child growing up in Chicago, his martial arts and policing careers, his transition to academia, and the current state of police defensive tactics training in the United States.Dr. Jeremy Butler is a newly minted Assistant Professor at Judson University in Illinois. He recently completed his PhD at the University of Illinois where he conducted research on police use of force training. Dr. Butler is also a full time police officer completing his last few shifts before transitioning to academia for good. In addition, Dr. Butler is a highly accomplished martial artist and draws on that expertise in both his work as a police officer and as an academic. His research interests include using a social cognitive framework to evaluate how physical training impacts performance and behavior. His area of focus is on police training, officer perceptions and performance in non-lethal force encounters. Twitter @JeremyButlerPhD Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.htmlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)
77:02 06/24/2020
#19 - HOW DO WE MAKE POLICE OFFICERS TREAT TRANSGENDER PEOPLE FAIRLY? – Professor Jace Valcore
On this episode, Professor Valcore and I discuss the history of policing in the transgender community, the current state of affairs, what impact has training on addressing the problem, and steps we can take to create an institution that provides all communities with fair and equitable police services.  Jace L. Valcore, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Houston Downtown. His educational background includes degrees in Sociology, Criminal Justice, and Public Affairs.  This multidisciplinary training fuels research interests in public policy, criminal law, social justice, and the criminal legal system with a specifically queer lens focused on the experiences, needs, and elevation of the LGBTQ community.  He is currently completing projects on the experiences of LGBTQ police officers, media analysis of the 2016 mass shooting at Pulse nightclub in Orlando, FL, hate speech in political campaigns, and more.  He provides queer competency workshops, including Trans 101 in-service police training, and serves on UHD’s Criminal Justice Training Center Advisory Board and the Houston Independent Police Oversight Board.  https://www.uhd.edu/academics/public-service/criminal-justice/Pages/valcore.aspxMap of Gender Diverse Cultures from PBS Independent Lens: https://www.pbs.org/independentlens/content/two-spirits_map-html/DOJ Community Relations Service Roll Call Training Video: https://www.justice.gov/crs/video/law-enforcement-and-transgender-community-crs-roll-call-training-videoTom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.htmlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)
67:16 06/24/2020
#17 - ADDRESSING RACIAL INEQUALITY FROM WITHIN THE CONSERVATIVE MOVEMENT with BRENDA GERBER VINCENT
Brenda Gerber Vincent is a former Deputy Finance Director for the “Mike Pence for Indiana” campaign and later served as First Lady Karen Pence’s Chief of Staff. Currently, she works to bring economic opportunity to the greater Ft. Wayne Indiana area. We talk about our shared experience at the Aspen Institute’s Socrates Program earlier this year and how she is leveraging what she learned to bring change to her community. Brenda joined Greater Fort Wayne Inc. in January 2019. She manages investor services, community and corporate partnerships, signature programs, advocacy, communications, and more.Brenda has a history of taking on bold projects. As a commissioner for Indiana’s bicentennial celebration, she oversaw statewide bicentennial projects including Hoosier Homecoming, the Bicentennial Gala, and Ignite the Future, all designed to showcase Hoosier pride. Given an initial goal of 200 projects, the committee eventually endorsed more than 1,500 projects in communities around the state. She was the only representative from northeast Indiana appointed to the Opportunity Zones Task Force, a federal initiative to bring private-sector investments to low-income areas.A fourth-generation Fort Wayne native, Brenda serves on the board of directors for the Parkview Regional Medical Center, as well as the Carriage House, a local nonprofit she co-founded in 1997 that helps people recover from mental illness and reintegrate into the community. She is also on the board of governors for the Richard G. Lugar Excellence in Public Service Series, a national leadership program that prepares women for service in public office.In 2018, Brenda earned the Indiana Commission on Women’s prestigious “Heart of Indiana – Torchbearer Award.” In 2016, she received the Sagamore of the Wabash, Indiana’s highest civilian honor.Brenda served both Governor Pence and First Lady Karen Pence of Indiana.  She served as the Deputy Finance Director for the “Mike Pence for Indiana” campaign and as the First Lady’s Chief of Staff.  Brenda was selected to serve on both the 2012 & 2016 Statewide GOP Platform Committees, and has twice been elected as a Delegate to the GOP State Convention.Brenda served as a Governor appointed, Indiana Bicentennial Commissioner, and serves on numerous boards including, The Board of Governors for the Richard G. Lugar Excellence in Public Service Series, The Carriage House, First Lady’s Charitable Foundation, and the “100+ Women Who Care” Steering Committee.  In December 2016 Brenda was awarded the “Sagamore of the Wabash” – Indiana’s highest civilian honor.Brenda is proud to be a fourth generation Fort Wayne native.  She received her bachelor’s degree from Indiana University, where she continues to serve on the Indiana University Board of Associates for the Student Foundation.  Besides her husband and children, she considers her single greatest achievement co-founding the Carriage House—a psychosocial rehabilitation facility established to restore seriously mentally ill persons to maximum social and employment functioning. Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.html  Support the show
60:11 06/23/2020
#16 - VIOLENCE IN POLICING – A DOUBLE EDGED SWORD – protests, chokes, and jiu jitsu – Ed Maguire
On this episode, Professor Ed Maguire from Arizona State University joins me to discuss the current crisis in policing. We talk about his working-class path through academia and journey to martial arts, choke holds in law enforcement, the Rayshard Brooks police homicide, and the current state of police defensive tactics in America. Professor Maguire studies policing and is a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu instructor. His FREE recent book on managing protests:https://www.hfg.org/policingprotests.htm ACADEMIC BIO:Edward Maguire is a professor of criminology and criminal justice at Arizona State University, where he also serves as an associate director of the Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety. He received his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the State University of New York at Albany in 1997.Professor Maguire’s research focuses primarily on policing and violence. He is also interested in the application of criminology to the study of crime and justice issues in the developing world. His recent research has focused on procedural justice and legitimacy, police response to protests, gangs and gang violence, officer safety and wellness, and evaluating the impact of violent crime control initiatives.Professor Maguire has lectured or carried out research in 24 nations on five continents. He has also written or edited five books and more than 90 journal articles and book chapters on various themes related to policing, violence, gangs, research methodology, and comparative criminology.https://isearch.asu.edu/profile/2970131 BJJ BIO:Ed Maguire is a brown belt in Gracie Jiu Jitsu under Master Pedro Sauer. Ed studied directly under Master Sauer at his headquarters in Northern Virginia. He has also studied under several members of the Gracie family, including Grandmasters Relson and Rickson Gracie. Ed's goal is to teach his students authentic Gracie Jiu Jitsu with a strong focus on self-defense. He believes that anyone can do Jiu Jitsu, regardless of age, sex, size, or athletic ability. He strives to maintain a safe and supportive training environment where people can learn at their own pace.As a university professor for more than 20 years, Ed loves teaching and helping to bring out the best in his students, both in the classroom and on the mats.https://www.cactusjj.com/instructorTom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.htmlBjj in policing, should police learn brazilian jiu jitsu, how to fix the police, police use of deadly force training, how to stop the riots, how to end the protests, what should police do, how can the police, rayshard brooks reactions, podcast about the police, learn about the police, how to reform the police, ed Maguire, 21st century policingSupport the show
72:32 06/20/2020
#15 - Public Sociology During an Age of Rapid Technological Change – Public Criminology – Rod Graham
On this episode, Professor Rod Graham from the Sociology and Criminology Department at Old Dominion University joins me. We talk about how academics can engage the general public during an age of rapid technological change, the unique power of the George Floyd homicide video, the uprisings and social division, class in higher education, and how to build a new collective national ethos for the 21st century. Professor Graham has a fantastic YouTube channel with tons of informative content. Please check it out and subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7yofOWy-IrERYjfkONF3Tw/featuredChannel Description: My name is Rod Graham, and this my YouTube Channel – Conversations and Perspectives. As an academic, I have spent a lot of time writing and publishing research articles. But how many people are reading them? There are so many people out there who want to learn about sociological and criminological issues, but don’t want to read dense academic articles or take an entire course. Those are the people I’m trying to reach. I think there is room for intelligent conversation about a topic – conversation that stretches our understandings about the world. I intentionally seek out people with a unique perspective on the topic. Thus, conversations and perspectives.Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.htmlSupport the show
80:17 06/16/2020
#14 - Desistance from Crime as a Social Movement: Change in an Age of Civil Unrest – Shadd Maruna
In this episode, Professor Shadd Maruna and I discuss his work on desistance from crime. We talk about how desistance is becoming a social movement, the importance of centering the lived experiences of the incarcerated and formerly incarcerated, and what we can learn from other social movements as we move to make change in policing following the George Floyd murder subsequent uprisings.  Prior to moving to Queen's University Belfast, Shadd Maruna was a lecturer at the University of Cambridge and the University of Manchester, and a Dean of the Rutgers School of Criminal Justice (US). His book Making Good: How Ex-Convicts Reform and Rebuild Their Lives was named the "Outstanding Contribution to Criminology" by the American Society of Criminology (ASC) in 2001. He has been a Fulbright Scholar, a Soros Justice Fellow, and an H. F. Guggenheim Fellow, and has received research funding from the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation, the ESRC, and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, among other sources. He has received awards from the Howard League for Penal Reform and from the ESRC for the impact of his research on challenging the prison and probation systems. He has authored or edited six books and over 85 articles and book chapters since 1997. https://pure.qub.ac.uk/en/persons/shadd-marunahttp://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=e0qdrFUAAAAJ&hl=enTwitter: @istudytrustTwitter: @criminologyTom Baker in a 2018 Tillman Scholar and has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://pattillmanfoundation.org/meet-our-scholars/thomas-baker/Twitter: @thomasowenbakerResearch Discussed:Article: Maruna, S. (2017). Desistance as a social movement. Irish Probation Journal, 14(1), 5-20.Book: https://www.amazon.com/Making-Good-Ex-Convicts-Reform-Rebuild-ebook/dp/B003Q6CX32/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Making+good%3A+How+ex-convicts+reform+and+rebuild+their+lives&qid=1591724104&sr=8-1 Article Abstract:Summary: Desistance from crime has been a considerable success story for academic criminology. The concept has deep roots, but did not emerge as a mainstream focus of study for the field until the 1990s movement towards developmental or life-course criminology. From these origins, however, the term has taken on a life of its own, influencing policy and practice in criminal justice. This paper will briefly review this history, then explore what might be next for desistance research among numerous possible futures. I argue that the most fruitful approach would be to begin to frame and understand desistance not just as an individual process or journey, but rather as a social movement, like the Civil Rights movement or the ‘recovery movements’ among individuals overcoming addiction or mental health challenges. This new lens better highlights the structural obstacles inherent in the desistance process and the macro-social changes necessary to successfully create a ‘desistance-informed’ future. Keywords: Desistance, social movement theory, mass incarceration, stigma. Support the show
61:20 06/11/2020
#13 - Public Trust in Policing: Are we even ready to begin the conversation? – Joe Hamm
In this episode, Professor Joe Hamm discusses the role of public trust in policing. We talk about the current national crisis, what needs to happen before the process of building trust in policing can even begin, why it is so important, and his research on the subject.  Joe Hamm is Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Environmental Science at Michigan State University. A psychologist by training, his work lies at the nexus of government and the public where he investigates what trust is, how best to appropriately measure it, and its connection to "outcomes" like cooperation and compliance. Joe’s work spans a number of governmental contexts, seeking to use research on trust in trustees like the police, courts, water infrastructure managers, natural resource authorities, and a variety of state and federal entities to develop a cross-boundary social science of trust.Joe works closely with a variety of criminal justice and environmental organizations, and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Trust Research and Psychology, Public Policy, and the Law. His teaching responsibilities include CJ 905 (Law and Society), CJ 908 (The Cross-Boundary Social Science of Trust in the Institutional Context), and ESP 804 (Environmental Applications and Analysis). Joe also supervises the School of Criminal Justice’s doctoral traineeship in the State Courts and Society. https://cj.msu.edu/directory/hamm-joseph.htmlTwitter: @istudytrustTom Baker in a 2018 Tillman Scholar and has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://pattillmanfoundation.org/meet-our-scholars/thomas-baker/Twitter: @thomasowenbaker Research Discussed:Hamm, J. A., Trinkner, R., & Carr, J. D. (2017). Fair process, trust, and cooperation: Moving toward an integrated framework of police legitimacy. Criminal justice and behavior, 44(9), 1183-1212. Abstract:Positive public perceptions are a critical pillar of the criminal justice system, but the literature addressing them often fails to offer clear advice regarding the important constructs or the relationships among them. The research reported here sought to take an important step toward this clarity by recruiting a national convenience sample to complete an online survey about the police in the respondent’s community, which included measures of the process-based model of legitimacy and the classic model of trust. Our results suggest that although both are predictive, the models can be integrated in a way that allows the strengths of each model to address the weaknesses of the other. We therefore present this model as a first step toward an Integrated Framework of Police Legitimacy that can meaningfully incorporate much of the existing scholarship and provide clearer guidance for those who seek to address these constructs in research and practice.Keywords policing, legitimacy, trust, procedural fairness, trustworthiness Support the show
59:53 06/09/2020
#12 - Strangulation and Choking in Policing – Reuben Howden
In this episode, Professor Reuben Howden explains the difference between strangulation and choking, what impact these have on the human body, and application in law enforcement. We also discuss the recent uprisings across and how to move forward.Dr. Howden’s research program focuses on genetic control of cardiopulmonary function at baseline and under specific environmental conditions. Further, Dr. Howden is investigating the mechanisms associated with isometric training induced reductions in human resting blood pressure. Reuben Howden received a B.Sc. (hons) in Sports Science (including biomedical science) from Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK in 1999 and a Ph.D. in human blood pressure regulation from DeMontfort University, Leicester, UK in 2002.  Dr. Howden then moved with his family to the USA where he completed 6 years of post-doctoral work at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences from 2002 to 2008.  Dr. Howden joined the faculty of the Department of Kinesiology at UNC Charlotte from 2008 to present.  Dr. Howden serves as the director of the Exercise Physiology Research Laboratory, in addition to Department, College and University committees.  Dr. Howden is a professional member of the American Heart Association, a member of The American College of Sports Medicine, and serves as a reviewer for 7 peer-reviewed journals.  Dr. Howden currently collaborates with Drs. Susan Arthur and Mike Turner in Kinesiology, Drs.Yvette Huet and Mark Clemens in the Dept. of Biology at UNCC, Dr. Steven Kleeberger at The National Institute of Environmental Health Science and Dr. Ian Swaine at Canterbury Christchurch University, UK https://pages.uncc.edu/rhowden/ Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.html Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)
50:14 06/05/2020
#11 - Women of the Caliphate in America – Dr. Margaret Webber Smith
On this episode, Dr. Margaret Webber Smith and I discuss her work on female Islamic State (ISIS) members who reside in the United States. We also talk about her career as an army officer, her new job at the United States Military Academy at West Point, and our shared love for the Pat Tillman Foundation. Margaret is a U.S. Army Officer with over fifteen years on Active Duty. She originally enlisted in 2004 to complete her undergraduate education but serving quickly became a passion and turned into a career. She commissioned as a Military Intelligence Officer in 2013 after completing her MPP (with a focus in Homeland Security and Intelligence Policy) at Georgetown University with the Army’s Green to Gold Program. While at GU she was named a Tillman Scholar and received the Whittington Scholarship for second year students at the McCourt School. She is a trained senior watch officer, cyberspace operations planer, offensive cyberspace operations mission commander, and will take a position at the United States Military Academy’s Army Cyber Institute in a couple weeks. She earned her doctoral degree at George Washington University’s Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration. Her research focuses on the intersection of gender, terrorism, and technology by investigating female Islamic State supporters in the US but has also published work on the behavioral economics of the cellular phone app-market and cybersecurity preferences of senior executives in the private sector. Maggie is also a volunteer and advocate for previvors – women and men who inherit the BRCA 1 or 2 genetic mutation putting them at extremely high risk for developing breast, ovarian, or prostate cancer during their lifetimes. Sharing her personal experiences with preventive surgery, as a result of being BRCA 2 positive, with others facing a similar choice is a huge part of her life and personal healing process. Maggie is an avid outdoorswoman and ultrarunner who is always looking to turn a weekend into a micro-adventure.Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.html Support the show
82:26 06/02/2020
#10 - The Future of Policing Amidst an Uprising – The George Floyd Homicide - Thaddeus Johnson
On this episode, Professor Thaddeus Johnson and I discuss his path in and out of policing, his research, the George Floyd Murder, Codiv-19, police management, and the future of U.S. policing. Thaddeus Johnson is a Criminal Justice and Criminology professor at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Following his career in law enforcement, Thaddeus received a bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Criminal Justice at the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga, then a PhD at Georgia State University. Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.html Support the show
53:13 06/02/2020
#9 - The connections between foster care and the criminal justice system – Lauren Morgan
On this episode, I talk with Lauren Morgan about the complicated relationship between the foster care system and the juvenile criminal justice system in the U.S. Lauren is a PhD student in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri – St. Louis. Prior to becoming an academic Lauren was (and still is) a professional water skier. We also talk a little bit about the George Floyd murder in Minneapolis and how the fallout may be impacting children in foster care. Please contact Lauren via email or Twitter:Email: l.morgan@mail.umsl.eduTwitter: @laurenmorganskiTom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.htmlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)Support the show
61:34 05/30/2020
#8 - The power of the American Sheriff – Mirya Holman
On this episode, Professor Mirya Holman and I discuss the powerful role of the Sheriff in U.S. culture and politics. We talk about immigration, constraints on police administrators, the future of elected law enforcement officials, and the role of sheriffs in managing Covid-19 and ending mass incarceration.   Professor Holman’s research interests focus on women and politics, local politics, research methods, and environmental politics. Their book, Women in Politics in the American City (Temple University Press) examines the effect of the female mayors and city council members on urban politics. Currently they are researching gender and political ambition, how local politics change when cities encounter financial distresses, the role of religious beliefs in political attitudes and actions, gender and the 2016 election, and the pathways to political office. Holman is an Associate Professor at Tulane University. https://liberalarts.tulane.edu/departments/political-science/people/mirya-holmanTom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.htmlWORK DISCUSSED Kurtz, D. L., & Upton, L. L. (2018). The gender in stories: How war stories and police narratives shape masculine police culture. Women & criminal justice, 28(4), 282-300. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)
56:12 05/12/2020
#7 - The power of storytelling in policing – Don Kurtz
On this episode, Professor Don Kurtz and I discuss the role of storytelling in law enforcement. How do the gendered stories officers tell influence police culture and the rest of society? We also discuss the uncertainty of post-Coronavirus higher education and the utility of gallows humor. Perhaps the most interesting social worker in the world - he once had an awkward pause with a client just to see what it felt like.  He can break down defense mechanisms with a look, or thirty hours of behavior modifications - either way Don Kurtz became an assistant professor of social work at Kansas State in the summer of 2008. His research interests include juvenile justice, probation outcomes, youth violence, family aggression, and the link between gender and violence. His research is published in the Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Feminist Criminology, Southwest Journal of Criminal Justice, and Western Criminology Review.  Prior to completing his doctorate, Don was employed as a social worker in a juvenile probation office and he has many years of direct practice experience in the criminal justice system. Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20S...WORK DISCUSSED Kurtz, D. L., & Upton, L. L. (2018). The gender in stories: How war stories and police narratives shape masculine police culture. Women & criminal justice, 28(4), 282-300.Support the show
68:52 05/11/2020
#6 - Can a police officer use Jiu-Jitsu to control a larger suspect? – Evandro Nunes
On this episode, World Class Brazilian Jiu Jitsu competitor and police trainer Evandro Nunes tells us about the state of police defensive tactics training in the United States. We also talk about the importance managing time and distance in a fight and how to improve public trust in policing.Evandro Nunes earned his Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) black belt under Márcio Barão. As a competitor, Evandro has won metals at the World No-Gi Championship, the Pan American Championship, the Abu Dhabi Grand Slam, and the American Nationals; all his wins have come via submission. Currently, he is the lead instructor for Gracie Survival Tactics, a defensive tactics training program for police officers. When he isn’t traveling around the world training police officers, Evandro continues to compete in BJJ and is also a professional MMA fighter.  GracieUniversity.com/GSThttps://twitter.com/evandroskilla?lan...https://www.instagram.com/evandroskil...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPCR9...Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20S...Support the show
62:39 05/11/2020
#5 - Photographing methamphetamine struggles in the rural south – Whitney Tchoula
On this episode, Whitney Tchoula and I discuss her work using photographs to explore methamphetamine consumption in the rural south. We talk about agency, ethics, the power of images, and Whitney walks us through some amazing photographs.   Whitney Tchoula began her Ph.D at Rutgers School of Criminal Justice in 2017. Her research interests include drug use, drug markets, rural crime, gender, and visual criminology. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Drug Policy, Deviant Behavior, among others. She has presented her research at international and regional conferences, such as The American Society of Criminology and the Southern Criminal Justice Association annual meetings. In addition to research, Whitney is a passionate undergraduate instructor having designed and taught Criminology and Introduction to Writing in Criminal Justice (this course was instructed at New Jersey City University). She holds a B.A. in Sociology from Western Kentucky University and a M.S in Criminal Justice from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. https://rscj.newark.rutgers.edu/peopl...Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20S...WORKS DISCUSSEDCopes, H., Tchoula, W., Brookman, F., & Ragland, J. (2018). Photo-elicitation interviews with vulnerable populations: Practical and ethical considerations. Deviant Behavior, 39(4), 475-494.Check out the powerful work of Whitney’s photo documentary research partner, Jared Ragland here: https://jaredragland.com/Support the show
60:16 05/11/2020
#4 - Race, Class and Cannabis - Bobby Boxerman
On this episode, Bobby Boxerman and I discuss the role race and class play in shaping cannabis laws. What role did these forces play in making the plant illegal, in enforcing the laws, and in the current wave of legalization? We also talk about Bobby’s engineering background and the future of academia in the age of coronavirus. To help guide the discussion, Bobby requested I read a law journal article by Steven Bender ahead of time. Follow the link below for a free copy of the article.  Bobby Boxerman is a graduate student in UMSL's Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice. He plans to spend next year studying at Leiden University in the Netherlands before returning to UMSL to complete his PhD. His main areas of interests include cannabis regulation and human trafficking. Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20S...WORKS DISCUSSED Bender, S. W. (2016). The colors of cannabis: Race and marijuana. UCDL Rev., 50, 689.https://heinonline.org/HOL/LandingPag...Support the show
66:00 05/11/2020
#3 - The Masculine Performance of Iron Mike Tyson - Tony Jefferson
On this episode, Professor Tony Jefferson and I discuss his research on Iron Mike Tyson. What can someone like Tyson tell us about masculinity, race, violence, and policing?    Tony Jefferson graduated from Loughborough College of Education with a degree in Education in 1969. After teaching in schools for three years, he did postgraduate work in the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, Birmingham University (1972-7), receiving his MA in 1974.He took up a Home Office funded Police Research Fellowship at Sheffield University in 1977. In 1980 he became a Lecturer in Criminology, also at Sheffield University where he taught for the next 16 years. He was made a Professor there in 1994 and was appointed Professor of Criminology by Keele University in 1997, where he remained until his retirement in 2007. Between 1997 and 2000 he was Head of the Department of Criminology.He has also held Visiting Professorships in Sweden, Denmark, Australia and the USA, including a year as Visiting Presidential Scholar at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York (2007-08).He has researched and published widely on questions to do with youth subcultures, the media, policing, race and crime, masculinity, fear of crime and racial violence. His recent books include: Policing the Crisis 2nd edn., 2013 (with Stuart Hall et al); Doing Qualitative Research Differently 2nd edn., 2012 (with Wendy Hollway); Psychosocial Criminology, 2007 (with Dave Gadd); Resistance through Rituals 2nd edn., 2006  (edited with Stuart Hall). Between 1999 and 2002 he was the British Editor of the journal Theoretical Criminology.Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20S...WORKS DISCUSSED Jefferson, T. (1998). Muscle,Hard Men'and Iron'Mike Tyson: Reflections on Desire, Anxiety and the Embodiment of Masculinity. Body & Society, 4(1), 77-98.Jefferson, T. (1996). From ‘little fairy boy’to the ‘compleat destroyer’: subjectivity and transformation in the biography of Mike Tyson. Understanding masculinities, 153-167.Jefferson, T. (1996). 'Tougher than the rest': Mike Tyson and the destructive desires of masculinity. Arena Journal, (6), 89.Jefferson, T. (1997). The Tyson Rape Trial: the Law, Feminism and Emotional'Truth'. Social & Legal Studies, 6(2), 281-301.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)
61:25 05/11/2020
#2 - The commemoration of death and police culture - Michael Sierra-Arévalo
On this episode, Professor Sierra-Arévalo and I discuss one of his most recent publications: “The Commemoration of Death, Organizational Memory, and Police Culture” --- When a police officer is killed on duty, their fellow officers memorialize that person in a variety of ways. We talk about how these memorials influence police culture and why it matter for the rest of society. We also talk about what drew Professor Sierra-Arévalo to study policing and even chat a little bit about Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.   Michael Sierra-Arévalo is an Assistant Professor in the Rutgers School of Criminal Justice. His research focuses on policing in the United States and uses both quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate police culture, behavior, and legitimacy. His current book project uses ethnographic observations and interviews across three urban departments to explore how police officers are formally and informally socialized to emphasize danger and the threat of violence in their work, as well as how the constant demand for officer safety shapes police culture and encourages behaviors that perpetuate inequalities in the criminal justice system.Michael’s research interests also include gangs, firearms, social networks, and violence prevention. His research has appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Criminology, Law & Society Review, Crime & Delinquency, Annual Review of Law and Social Science, and multiple edited volumes. In addition to peer-reviewed research, he continues to work with practitioners to use data-driven approaches to enhance public safety.Michael holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from Yale University and a B.A. in Sociology and Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin.Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.htmlABSTRACT:Police scholars document that although there is fragmentation of the so‐called “monolithic” police culture, historically consistent features of the occupational culture of police exist. By drawing on ethnographic observations in three U.S. police departments, I describe how one consistent feature of police culture—the preoccupation with danger and potential death—is maintained by the commemoration of officers killed in the line of duty. Through the use of commemorative cultural artifacts, officers and departments construct an organizational memory that locally reflects and reifies the salience of danger and potential death in policing. Furthermore, commemoration of fallen officers is not restricted to a department's own; the dead of other departments are commemorated by distant police organizations and their officers, maintaining broad, occupational assumptions of dangerous and deadly police work that transcend a single department and its localized organizational memory. Implications for the study of police culture, inequalities in policing, and police reform are considered.Sierra‐Arévalo, M. (2019). The commemoration of death, organizational memory, and police culture. Criminology, 57(4), 632-658.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35486104)
55:47 05/11/2020
#1 - Are college educated police officers different? – Professor Richard Rosenfeld
On this episode, Professor Richard Rosenfeld and I discuss his most recent publication: Are College-Educated Officers Different? --- Many people assume hiring officers with college degrees will improve policing. Are they right? We also discuss the importance of public trust in policing and the implications of the coronavirus (Covid-19). ABSTRACT:A study of more than 60,000 police traffic stops found that college-educated officers were more likely than other officers to stop drivers for less serious violations, perform consent searches, and make arrests on discretionary grounds. These results are consistent with those of prior research indicating that college-educated officers are more achievement oriented and eager for advancement based on the traditional performance criteria of stops, searches, and arrests. The results raise questions regarding the recommendation of the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing (2015) to improve police-community relations by hiring more college-educated police officers, especially in urban communities where concerns about over policing are widespread. If community engagement were to become a primary basis for professional advancement, however, the current results suggest that college-educated officers may adapt to the new standards as diligently as they have to the traditional criteria for reward and promotion in U.S. police departments. A Curators’ Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Professor Rosenfeld's research interests include the social sources of violent crime, crime statistics, and crime control policy. His current research focuses on explaining U.S. crime trends. Dr. Rosenfeld served as President of the American Society of Criminology in 2010. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/faculty/rosenfeld.html Tom Baker has been a PhD student in UMSL's Criminology and Criminal Justice program since 2017. Tom received his BA in Political Science from Arizona State University and worked as a police officer for approximately nine years. His research interests include police culture, use of force, and qualitative research methods. https://www.umsl.edu/ccj/Graduate%20Students/baker.htmlRosenfeld, R., Johnson, T. L., & Wright, R. (2018). Are college-educated police officers different? A study of stops, searches, and arrests. Criminal Justice Policy Review, 0887403418817808.Support the show
52:24 05/11/2020