Show cover of The Book Club Review

The Book Club Review

Discussion, debate, even a little dispute – expect it all on The Book Club Review. Every month hosts Kate and Laura bring you a new episode. That could be Book Club where we chat about the book read most recently by one of our book clubs. It could be Bookshelf, an episode dedicated to the books we’re reading outside of book club – the ones we get to pick and choose. Or it could be an interview with a book club, bookshop or book lover. Whatever the topic, every episode features lively and frank reviews and recommendations.

Tracks

Books that Make us Laugh • Episode 161
Inspired by the folk at the New York Times article ‘22 of the funniest novels since Catch 22’, join me (Kate), Phil and Laura as we consider the books that make us laugh. Listen in as we explore the NYT's suggestions and add in a few of our own. Find out the author we can’t believe they missed, and the book that reliably makes Laura – a tough customer when it comes to funny books – laugh every time.    Books mentioned    The New York Times article ‘22 of the funniest novels since Catch 22’  Slaughterhouse 5 by Kurt Vonnegut   The Idiot and Either/Or by Elif Batuman   The Possessed by Elif Batuman   Uncle Napoleon by Iraj Pezeshkzad   Martyr by Kaveh Akbar   Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi   Where d’You Go Bernadette by Maria Semple   The Ascent of Rum Doodle by W.E. Bowman   Three Men and a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome   Scoop by Evelyn Waugh   Vanity Fair by William MakepieceThackarey   The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams   The Bookshop by Penelope Fitzgerald   The Blue Flower by Penelope Fitzgerald   Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders   Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel   Notes   Here’s the Patreon link If you’d like to get more involved and support the show, and you’ll get lots of good things in return: Patreon.com/thebookclubreview   Keep up to date between shows, follow The Book Club Review podcast on Instagram   Next book club read: Wifedom by Anna Funder   Do take a quick moment to rate and review us via your podcast app, your support is really appreciated. And hey, if you have bookish friends, tell them about the show, maybe they will like it too.  
57:30 6/6/24
Talking Non-Fiction, with Tom Rowley of Backstory • Episode #160
Exploring literary worlds beyond fiction: a dive into non-fiction   Join Kate, as she ventures to South London to visit Backstory, a unique indie bookstore founded by former journalist Tom Rowley. Rowley shares his journey from journalism to opening a bookshop, the challenges and joys of running a bookstore, the importance of community engagement, and launching the second issue of the Backstory Magazine.    We then turn our attention to non-fiction, pulling out some favourites, both backlist and new releases. As Tom says, 'I just read. I want good stories, I don't care whether they're true or not'   00:40 A visit to south London's indie bookshop Backstory, and why Kate's name is on the wall   01:53 From journalism to bookshop owner: Tom's lockdown dream comes true   04:25 Embracing the community: the transition from market stall to bookshop   09:26 Launching Backstory Magazine: a new chapter in storytelling   14:54 Exploring non-fiction: feel the fear and read it anyway   17:49 Just what is deep backlist? Tom's first recommendation is My War Gone By, I Miss it So by Anthony Lloyd (September Publishing)   20:18 Kate recommends Fall: The Mystery of Robert Maxwell by John Preston (Penguin)   22:46 Tom's next pick: Maurice and Marilyn: A Whale, A Shipwreck, A Love Story by Sophie Elmhurst (Penguin)   25:52 Kate pulls out The Wager by David Grann (Simon & Schuster) (and we also talk about Devil in the White City by Erik Larson [Penguin])   29:08 Tom recommends The Trading Game by Gary Stevenson (Penguin)   31:15 Great minds think alike: Kate and Tom both recommend The Moth and the Mountain by Ed Caesar (Penguin), author and now DJ!   35:32 An aside from Kate about The Possessed by Elif Batuman (Granta)   37:17 Towards the end of the episode we reach 'peak Tom', with Little Englanders by Alwyn Turner (Profile)   41:17 Book club reads: Red Memory by Tania Branigan (Faber) and Close to Home by Michael Magee (Penguin)   42:25 Tom's book of the summer: The Safe Keep by Yael van der Wouden (Penguin)   44:18 List of books, how to get support the pod and get extras via our Patreon account and details of our upcoming episode in which Phil and Laura join Kate to talk about books that make us laugh   Notes Visit Backstory online at www.backstory.london  
46:49 5/5/24
Browsing the So Many Damn Books bookshelf, with Christopher Hermelin • #159
So Many Damn Books podcast creator and host Christoper Hermelin joins Kate to swap book recommendations and discuss the magic of book club, recent book discoveries and bookish pet peeves. EPISODE BOOK LIST The Eyes & The Impossible by Dave Eggers A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers McSweeney’s magazine, including The Panorama issue How I Won A Nobel Prize by Julius Taranto Non-Fiction by Julie Myerson Butter by Asako Yuzuki (Polly Barton, trans.) Mild Vertigo by Mieko Kanai (Polly Barton, trans.) Fifty Sounds by Polly Barton The Extinction of Irena Ray by Jennifer Croft James by Percival Everett, and we also mentioned Erasure and The Trees Funny Things: A Comic Strip Biography of Charles M. Schultz by Luca Debus and Francesco Mateuzzi NOTES Join the club and support us on Patreon Follow The Book Club Review on Instagram and Threads @bookclubreviewpodcast  
47:58 4/29/24
Book club: The New Life by Tom Crewe • Episode #158
Two marriages, two forbidden love affairs, and the passionate search for social and sexual freedom in late 19th-century London. Publishers Penguin call The New Life by Tom Crewe ‘A brilliant and captivating debut, in the tradition of Alan Hollinghurst and Colm Tóibín' but what did our book club make of it? Kate is reporting back, with regular guest Philip Chaffee joining from New York. We'll be catching up on the discussion as well as bringing you our take on recent reads FAKE ACCOUNTS by Lauren Oyler and NORTH WOODS by Daniel Mason, as well as our recommendations for books inspired by Crewe's novel. Booklist Fake Accounts by Lauren Oyler The Smiley Novels by John Le Carre North Woods by Daniel Mason Maurice by E. M. Forster Alec by William di Canzio Young Bloomsbury by Nino Strachey Blackouts by Justin Torres Miss Marjoribanks by Margaret Oliphant The Ladies Lindores by Margaret Oliphant Tom Crewe's booklist on bookshop.org.uk Podcast episode on Young Bloomsbury The audiobook of The New Life is read by Freddie Fox and published by Penguin Audio, available wherever you get your audiobooks Keep up with us between shows. Follow us on Instagram or Threads @bookclubreviewpodcast, browse our website for our full archive, or drop us a line at thebookclubreview@gmail.com Want the deep dive? All the details of our Patreon extras and how to sign up here. Thanks for listening, happy reading, happy book clubbing
41:22 4/10/24
Mild Vertigo and Japan lit • Episode 157
What did our podcast book club make of Mild Vertigo, Japanese author Mieko Kanai's 1997 novel, recently translated into English by Polly Barton. A 'modernist masterpiece' written in sentences that go on for pages with hardly any paragraph breaks might not seem like an obvious book club winner; listen in to find out if we were won over. To discuss it Kate is joined by Yuki Tejima, also known as @booknerdtokyo, and Shawn Mooney, aka Shawn the Book Maniac. Listen in for their thoughts on Mild Vertigo, their current reads and our book recommendations for anyone wanting the inside track on great Japanese fiction. Book list A Woman of Pleasure by Kiyoko Murata (trans. Juliet Winters Carpenter)  Home Reading Service by Fabio Morábito (trans. Curtis Bauer) Woman Running in the Mountains by Yūko Tsushima (trans. Geraldine Harcourt) Also Territory of Light and Child of Fortune by Yoko Tsutshima Grass for my Pillow by Sayiichi Maruya (trans. Dennis Keene) The Little House by Kyoto Nakajima (trans. Ginny Tapley Takamori) There’s No Such Thing as an Easy Job by Kikuo Tsumura (trans. Polly Barton) Fifty Sounds by Polly Barton Porn: An Oral History by Polly Barton Butter by Asako Yuzuki (trans. Polly Barton) Follow us on Instagram and threads @bookclubreviewpodcast Support the show and get Kate's weekly book-recommendations email, access to our book spreadsheets, connect with fellow readers and join our book club: find all the details on our Patreon page. If you enjoyed the episode, please share it, rate and review us on your podcast app, which helps other listeners find us. Find full shownotes and our episode archive at our website thebookclubreview.co.uk
56:15 3/13/24
Early Spring Bookshelf • Episode #156
Join me (Kate) and Laura as we go through our bookstacks and discuss our recent reads. Find out what why Laura can’t put down The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells. Meanwhile I’ve discovered Mrs Miniver, a comfort read from the 1930s that still has a message for us today, Laura’s made a discovery of her own – that there’s more to Anita Brookner than Hotel du Lac, with her 1988 novel The Latecomers. We go from one good book club read to another with The Fraud by Zadie Smith, and Laura reports in from the recent backlist past with How Much of These Hills is Gold by C. Pam Zhang. I take a detour through a ring of enchanted toadstools with Emily Wilde’s Encyclopedia of Faeries by Heather Fawcett, and Laura confesses to having spent a weekend lost in the pages of Fourth Wing by Rebecca Yarros. She's only interested in the dragons, mind. Books mentioned The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells Mrs Miniver by Jan Struther The Latecomers by Anita Brookner The Fraud by Zadie Smith (UK paperback out in June) How Much of These Hills is Gold by C. Pam Zhang Emily Wilde's Encyclopedia of Faeries by Heather Fawcett Fourth Wing by Rebecca Yarros UK listeners can find all the books listed above at our Bookshop.org.uk bookshop, if you purchase them there you'll be supporting independent bookshops and your favourite indie podcasters. Find out all the details of what we're offering on our Patreon here, including a weekly book recmomendations newsletter from Kate, occasional extra bits and bobs plus access to our pod book spreadsheets, and at the higher tier you can join our bookclub and talk books with Kate in person once a month. And come and find Kate on Instagram or Threads, or drop us a line at thebookclubreview@gmail.com and let us know your thoughts on the books discussed here anytime.
39:24 2/6/24
Future Reads 2024, with Chrissy Ryan • Episode #155
We’ve put our 2023 reading lists behind us, and now it's time to look ahead to 2024. Who better to guide us through all the new titles coming our way than Chrissy Ryan, owner of North London’s buzziest bookshop and social space, Bookbar. New books by favourite authors, a non-fiction page-turner that will have you hooked, a high-concept potential blockbuster and a follow-up novel from the author of a debut that got people talking, we’ve got something for everyone. Not to mention our tips and strategies for how to avoid feeling overwhelmed by that TBR. Listen via the media player above or your preferred podcast player with this podfollow link. Books mentioned You are Here by David Nicholls (April) All that Glitters by Orlando Whitfield (May) Some Trick by Helen DeWitt The Ministry of Time by Kaliane Bradley Glass Houses (May), and Voyeur by Francesca Reece England is Mine by Nicholas Padamsee (April) The Bee Sting by Paul Murray (out in paperback May 2024) Pineapple Street by Jenny Jackson Fire Weather by John Vaillant Not the End of the World by Dr Hannah Ritchie The Fraud by Zadie Smith If I Survive You by Jonathan Escoffery Help Wanted by Adelle Waldman (March) The Idiot by Elif Batuman Come and Get It by Kiley Reid (and we also mentioned Such a Fun Age) Notes Find out what we're up to and support the show on Patreon. The 10 Best New Novelists for 2024, The Observer Who is Still in the Metaverse by Paul Murray for New York Magazine
40:05 1/23/24
Best Books of 2023 • Episode #154
It's our 2023 review of the year. Join me (Kate), Laura and Phil as we look back over our favourites, from new releases to backlist gems. Find out our overall book of the year, plus the books we're looking forward to in 2024. If you're wondering what to read next, this is the show for you, with over fifty tried and tested recommendations. Support the show, get our weekly newsletter or join our monthly book club via Patreon. Follow us on Instagram or Threads Find full shownotes and a transcript on our website thebookclubreview.co.uk Book list Favourite New Release August Blue by Deborah Levy The Rainbow by Yasunari Kawabata, and we also discussed Snow Country Fire Rush by Jacqueline Crooks  Ducks: Two Years in the Oil Sands by Kate Beaton Now is Not the Time to Panic by Kevin Wilson Kick the Latch by Kathryn Scanlan   Favourite backlist title Austerlitz by W.G. Sebald The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston Charlotte by David Foenkinos A Month in the Country by J.L. Carr A Place of Greater Safety by Hilary Mantel Black Narcissus by Rumer Godden The Ginger Tree by Oswald Wynd   Favourite non-fiction This Much is True by Miriam Margolyes A House of Air (collected writing, ed. Hermione Lee) by Penelope Fitzgerald  The Palace Papers by Tina Brown How to Talk About Books you Haven’t Read by Piere Bayard Carmageddon by Daniel Knowles  Free by Lea Ypi   Favourite Book Club Read Super Infinite: The Transformations of John Donne by Katherine Rundell The Years by Annie Ernaux   Favourite comfort reads Went to London, Took the Dog by Nina Stibbe The Grove: A Nature Odyssey in 191/2 Front Gardens by Ben Dark Once Upon a Tome by Oliver Darkshire Madensky Square by Iva Ibbotson Romantic Comedy by Curtis Sittenfeld Instructions for a Heatwave by Maggie O’Farrell Going Zero by Anthony McCarten   Most disappointed by The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman Birnam Wood by Eleanor Catton Woman of Light by Kali Fajardo-Anstine (but do read Sabrina and Corina)   Patreon recommends Loot by Tania James Factory Girls by Michelle Gallen Cider House Rules by John Irving Cursed Bunny by Bora Chung The Axman’s Carnival by Catherine Chidgey Not Now Not Ever by Julia Gillard All That’s Left Unsaid by Tracey Lien River Sing Me Home by Eleanor Shearer The Boy and the Dog by Seishu Hase Cakes and Ale by Somerset Maugham The Mermaid of Black Conch by Monique Roffey Machines Like Me by Ian McKewan Death and the Penguin by Andrei Kurkov The Sixteen Trees of the Somme by Lars Mytting   Overall Book(s) of 2023 Septology by Jon Fosse (and we mentioned Morning and Evening) Stay True by Hua Hsu How to Read Now by Elaine Castillo The Vaster Wilds by Lauren Groff Monsters by Claire Dederer   Books we’re looking forward to Arturo’s Island by Elsa Moranti Rememberance of Things Past by Proust (vol. 3) Miss Benson’s Beetle by Rachel Joyce Cahokia Jazz by Francis Spufford Tremor by Teju Cole The Maniac by Benjamin Labatut  
67:35 12/29/23
The Booker Prize 2023 • Episode 153
We read all six Booker shortlisted books, now join us as we evaluate them and try to second-guess the Booker judges, before finding out the winner - don't miss our hot take. 'A novel is a mirror carried along a high road' says Chair of the Booker judges Esi Edyugan, quoting Stendhal. ‘Year after year’, she continues, ‘the Booker Prize encourages us to take sight of ourselves in the lives of others, to slip for the length of a story into different skins, to grapple with unfamiliar worlds that allow us to see our own afresh.' Unsurprisingly, seeing the world as it is right now has led to the most downbeat shortlist in our collective memory, but that doesn't mean these books don't make for fantastic discussion. As ever, we won't spoil the plots we'll just give you a sense of what we thought of them. Join me, Kate, with Laura, our regular guest Phil Chaffee, and first-timer, book blogger Martin Voke, as we talk through  The Bee Sting by Paul Murray (audiobook narrated by Heather O’Sullivan, Barry Fitzgerald, Beau Holland, Ciaran O'Brien, Lisa Caruccio Came and published by Penguin Audio) Prophet Song by Paul Lynch (audiobook narrated by Gerry O’Brien and published by Bolinda Audio @bolindaaudio @borrowbox) If I Survive You by Jonathan Escoffery (audiobook narrated by Torian Brackett and published by Fourth Estate) Western Lane by Chetna Maroo (audiobook narrated by Maya Saroya and published by Picador) This Other Eden by Paul Harding (audiobook narrated by Eduardo Ballerini, and published by Penguin Audio) and Study for Obedience by Sarah Bernstein (narrated by Sarah Bernstein and published by Granta) And for a deep dive into the winner and all fifty-seven previous winners of The Booker Prize don't miss Martin's website On the Prize  
71:59 12/11/23
Lonesome Dove, and other reads • Episode #152
Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry has sold over 2 and a half million copies worldwide since publication in 1985, and won a Pulitzer Prize. With prose as ‘as smooth as worn saddle-leather', USA today writes 'If you read only one Western novel in your life, read this one . . . no other has ever approached the accomplishment of Lonesome Dove'. More interesting to us, Lonesome Dove is one of those 'if-you-know-you-know' books, passed from reader to reader, once read, never forgotten. And yet not everyone is a fan – listen in to see what Laura's book club made of it. As ever we're careful not to spoil the plot, so rest assured we won't give away any of the book's secrets.  We're also recommending some follow-ons and some favourites from our recent reading piles. Book list Prairie Fires by Caroline Fraser Days Without End by Sebastian Barry The Vaster Wilds by Lauren Groff Austerlitz by W.G. Seabed Sharp by Michelle Dean How to Talk About Books you Haven’t Read by Pierre Bayard Notes If you read one article on Lonesome Dove, let it be this brilliant oral history that Texas Monthly put together, which is full of fascinating detail about the TV series and the book. The audiobook of Lonesome Dove is published by Phoenix Books and read by Lee Horsley. Links Website: https://www.thebookclubreview.co.uk Follow us on Instagram Find out about our Patreon, Kate's weekly book recommendations newsletter and how to join our book club and get extra episodes  
54:00 10/29/23
So Late in the Day and other reads • Episode #151
Irish author Claire Keegan is generally considered to be one of the finest writers working today. ‘Every word is the right word in the right place, and the effect is resonant and deeply moving’ said Hilary Mantel, of her work, while for Colm Toiíbín ‘Claire Keegan makes her moments real – and then she makes them matter.’ Praise indeed, but what did our brand new podcast book club make of So Late in the Day, her most recently published short story? We’ll be reporting back. And we’re also rounding up a few stand-outs from our recent reading piles, from J. L. Carr’s meditative classic A Month in the Country to V.E. Schwab’s latest fantasy novel The Fragile Threads of Power. Book list So Late in the Day and Small Things Like These by Claire Keegan The English Understand Wool by Helen DeWitt, The Road to the City by Natalia Ginsberg in the Storybook ND series Tom Lake, Bel Canto and The Dutch House by Ann Patchett The Masqueraders by Georgette Heyer The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy by Julia Quinn Miss Pym Disposes by Josephine Tey A Month in the Country, by J. L. Carr Soldier, Sailor by Claire Kilroy The Fragile Threads of Power by V.E. Schwab Join us on Patreon Here's the link for all the details, find out what extras you'll receive. Connect with us Find us on Instagram or Facebook @bookclubreviewpodcast On X at @bookclubrvwpod or email us at thebookclubreview@gmail.com, we love to hear from you
47:48 10/14/23
Fiction and Philosophy, with Jonny Thomson • Episode #150
Is there any point in doing a nice thing if you can’t flaunt it on social media? Can we ever know what it’s like to be a bat? If we know Cinderella isn’t real, why do we care about whether or not she marries the prince? In this episode Kate is joined by Jonny Thomson, the man behind the popular Instagram account @philosophyminis, and a bestselling book of the same name. With a new title out, Mini Big Ideas, it seemed the perfect time to catch up with him and consider the philosophical ideas that lie behind three works of fiction: The Death of Yvan Illyich by Leo Tolstoy, Death and the Penguin by Andrey Kurkov and Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman. Just what connects these three titles? Listen in to find out, plus a few more book recommendations. All that, plus discover 'the gap', and how knowing about it might change your life, and the benefits of scepticism. Book list On Fairy Stories by J.R.R. Tolkien The Road by Cormac McCarthy The Death of Ivan Illyich by Leo Tolstoy (and in particular the Peter Carson translation) Death and the Penguin by Andrei Kurkov Super-Infinite: The Transformations of John Donne by Katherine Rundell Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman Leonard & Hungry Paul by Ronan Hession Monsters: A Fan’s Dilemma by Claire Dederer Metaphysical Animals by Rachel Wiseman and Claire MacCumhaill Philosopher Queens by Rebecca Buxton and Lisa Whiting Mini Philosophy and Mini Big Ideas by Jonny Thomson Notes Find Jonny on Instagram @philosophyminis Find us at: https://www.thebookclubreview.co.uk Instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast Kate's Threads reading log: @bookclubreviewpodcast@threads.net Newsletter sign-up: https://substack.com/@thebookclubreview Patreon and book club: We've made free episodes of The Book Club Review for 6 years now, and we'll continue to keep them free, and ad-free. But they take a lot in terms of time and resources so if you appreciate the shows and would like to support us we now have a Patreon where you can do that. In return you'll get weekly bookish recommendations from Kate, plus, at the higher tier, extra episodes and membership of our podcast book club, to be held over Zoom once a month on Sunday nights (UK time). We would love to see you there. https://patreon.com/thebookclubreview
45:22 9/9/23
Late-Summer Reading, with Bookbar • Episode #149
Whether you're after fly-through-them page-turners or immersive long-reads, or perhaps you're after a challenge, or the perfect discussion book, we've got the list for you. Find out our expert picks from indie-bookshop Bookbar's Chrissy Ryan, a woman at the centre of a hub of reading recommendations from authors, customers and booksellers alike. Kate is swapping notes and sharing her own summer reading pile. Plus just to pack in even more book tips we've got a few extra recommendations from Chrissy's Bookbar team. And so sit back and let us give you books to inspire, inform, amuse and entertain as we see out the summer and anticipate our Autumn reads. Booklist The Guest by Emma Cline Yellowface by Rebecca F. Kuang The Centre, by Ayesha Manazir Siddiqui, Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin Small Worlds by Caleb Azumah Nelson, Time’s Shelter by Gyorgi Gospodinov, Whale by Cheon Myeong-kwan How to Read Now and America is not the Heart by Elaine Castillo Cahokia Jazz by Francis Spufford The Maniac by Benjamin Labatut Birnam Wood by Eleanor Catton The Secret History by Donna Tartt Demon Copperhead by Barbara Kingsolver Tom Lake, and These Precious Days by Ann Patchett Read This: Handpicked Favourites from America’s Indie Bookstores, compiled by Hans Weyandt (Coffee House Press) Roman Stories and Whereabouts by Jhumpa Lahiri Good Material by Dolly Alderton Notes Visit Bookbar online The indie publishing mavericks shaking up the UK book world (The Guardian) The Book Club Review's Fitzcarraldo episode  
53:00 8/21/23
The Years by Annie Ernaux, Super-Infinite by Katherine Rundell, and a whole lot more • Episode #148
If you've been wondering whether or not to tackle the work of Nobel-prizewinner Annie Ernaux, and in partiular The Years, generally considered to be definitive, listen in and find out what Laura's book club thought (you might be surprised). We're also generally delighted by how interesting the life of 17th-century poet John Donne is in the hands of Katherine Rundell, and her Baillie-Gifford prizewinner Super-Infinite. But were Kate's book club unanimous in their praise? Discover more great reads as we delve into our recent reading piles. Find out the hits and misses, plus the books we've got on the go right now. Booklist The Years by Annie Ernaux Super-Infinite by Katherine Rundell The Banished Immortal by Ha Jin Grey Bees by Andrei Kurkov Avid Reader by Robert Gottlieb (and we also mentioned the film Turn Every Page) Book Lovers by Emily Henry Watch us Dance by Leila Slimani (and we also mentioned her other books Lullaby or The Perfect Nanny, and The Country of Others) Birnam Wood by Eleanor Catton (and we also mentioned her previous book The Luminaries) Monsters by Claire Dederer The Great Reclamation by Rachel Heng Drive Your Plow over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tocarczuk Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry The Late Americans by Brandon Taylor Leave us a rating If you enjoy our shows and want to do a nice thing in return please do leave us a quick star rating and review. Wondering how to do that? From apple podcasts click the '...' next to the episode title (under the square graphic) and choose 'go to show'. From there scroll down past the episodes till you find 'Ratings & Reviews'. Tap the stars to add a star rating, tap 'write a review' slightly further down to add a comment. Thank you! Notes  Website: https://www.thebookclubreview.co.uk Instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast Kate's Threads reading log: @bookclubreviewpodcast@threads.net Newsletter sign-up: https://substack.com/@thebookclubreview Patreon and book club: We're cooking up a pod bookclub, launching September, as part of our Patreon account. You'll be supporting our show, and once a month on Sunday nights (UK time) you'll also be able to join Kate for an online book-club, to be held over zoom. We'll put all the details on our Patreon soon, and hope you'll sign up as we can't wait to talk books in person.
51:20 8/9/23
Bookshopaholics • Books on the Hill • #147
Join Kate in the historic market town of St. Albans, home to a cathedral, some impressive Roman ruins and one of Kate's favourite independent bookshops. Books on the Hill is owned and run by a mother and daughter duo who launched it just before the pandemic. Listen in and find out what makes it so special, their book club recommendations and discover Kate and Antonia's choices as they each pick three books from the shelves, from new releases to classic gems. Books mentioned: The Wild Places by Robert McFarlane The Bookshop by Penelope Fitzgerald The Sentence by Louise Erdrich Femina by Gina Ramirez The Scent of Flowers at Night by Leila Slïmani Ross Poldark by Winston Graham Queen Victoria by Lytton Strachey The Joy of Small Things by Hannah Jane Parkinson Why Women Grow by Alice Vincent Find Books on the Hill at https://www.books-on-the-hill.co.uk
26:29 8/1/23
Fiction Prescriptions with Ella Berthoud • #146
Join us as professional book-recommender and Bibliotherapy queen Ella Berthoud helps us figure out how to overcome life’s essential problems (if you’re a reader, that is), namely how to cope with all the books there are in the world, what to do when you feel stuck in a reading rut, and the ultimate question, if you’ve started a book you’re not enjoying, should you finish it? We’re also diving into Ella’s latest project, Fiction Prescriptions, a pack of cards with reading recommendations to soothe your soul and offer a cure for modern life, from Ageing through to Boredom via Hangovers and Procrastination.  Booklist Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne The Last Passenger by Will Dean Therese Raquin by Emile Zola Miss Benson’s Beetle by Rachel Joyce The Dream Job by Kiersten Modglin Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel The Overstory by Richard Powers And if you want more from the source do seek out The Novel Cure, co-written with Susan Elderkin, and Ella’s own books The Art of Mindful Reading, and Fiction Prescriptions. If you want to find out more about Ella’s bibliotherapy sessions or any other aspect of her work the link to her website, Ellaberthoud.com, is in the show notes. About us We hope you enjoyed this episode. For our full archive of nearly 150 shows, plus how to sign up to our bi-weekly-ish newsletter and how to support us on Patreon head over to our website, www.thebookclubreview.co.uk, where you'll also find full show notes for this episode and a transcript. Leave us a rating If you enjoy our shows and want to do a nice thing in return please do leave us a quick star rating and review. Wondering how to do that? From apple podcasts click the '...' next to the episode title (under the square graphic) and choose 'go to show'. From there scroll down past the episodes till you find 'Ratings & Reviews'. Tap the stars to add a star rating, tap 'write a review' slightly further down to add a comment. Thank you! Connect with us  Instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast Newsletter sign-up: https://substack.com/@thebookclubreview Patreon: Details coming soon…
41:25 7/8/23
The Women's Prize 2023 • Episode #145
Six books, four readers and, as always, plenty of opinions. Join Kate, Laura and guests Sarah Oliver and Nina Davies as they dive into the 2023 Women's Prize shortlist. But will they be able to second-guess the judges? As ever, we talk about these books in some detail but we won't spoil the plots for you, so listen in if you want to hear more and find out all the reasons why these are six books you won't want to miss. UPDATE: Keep listening at the end for our reaction after hearing the winner's announcement. Booklist Demon Copperhead by Barbara Kingsolver (Faber & Faber) Pod by Laline Paull (Corsair / Little Brown) Trespasses by Louise Kennedy (Bloomsbury) Black Butterflies by Priscilla Morris (Duckworth) Fire Rush by Jacqueline Crooks (Jonathan Cape / Penguin) The Marriage Portrait by Maggie O'Farrell (Tinder Press / Hachette) The Women's Prize website The prize is announced on 14th June 2023 Leave us a rating If you enjoy our shows and want to do a nice thing in return please do leave us a quick star rating and review. Wondering how to do that? From apple podcasts click the '...' next to the episode title (under the square graphic) and choose 'go to show'. From there scroll down past the episodes till you find 'Ratings & Reviews'. Tap the stars to add a star rating, tap 'write a review' slightly further down to add a comment. Thank you! Notes  Website: https://www.thebookclubreview.co.uk Instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast Newsletter sign-up: https://substack.com/@thebookclubreview Patreon: Details coming soon…  
85:26 6/11/23
Bookshelf: Summer vibes • Episode #144
Our bookshelf shows are the ones where we get to cut loose and follow our own preferences, so listen in as Kate and Laura swap feel-good early summer reads. Much to their relief after Rodham, the sex in Curtis Sittenfeld's latest novel ROMANTIC COMEDY turns out to be as good as the rest of it. Meanwhile Kate is surprised and entertained by Monica Heisey's REALLY GOOD, ACTUALLY. Via the discerning edit of the books aisle in her upmarket grocery store, Laura discovers PINEAPPLE STREET, and enjoys it hugely. Kate is fascinated and entertained by British actress Miriam Margolyes and her autobiography THIS MUCH IS TRUE, enjoying the social commentary as much as if not more than the showbiz stories (though those are good, too). And finally in a preview of Laura's thoughts on Women's Prize shortlisted DEMON COPPERHEAD, she reports back on what she thought of it. And if you thought you were over re-tellings of Greek myths Kate urges you to think again with STONE BLIND by Natalie Haynes.  Booklist Romantic Comedy by Curtis Sittenfeld Really Good, Acutally by Monica Heisey Pineapple Street by Jenny Jackson This Much is True by Miriam Margolyes Demon Copperhead by Barbara Kingsolver Stone Blind by Natalie Haynes and in our current reads section we talked about GREY BEES by Andrey Kurkov, and POD by Laline Paull. https://www.faber.co.uk/journal/cover-design-demon-copperhead/If you were interested by our discussion of the cover design for Demon Copperhead and want to know more, there's a brilliant behind-the-scenes into the design process on Faber's website, here. Get in touch with us and tell us what you’re reading or recommend us a book on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. Find our full episode archive at thebookclubreview.co.uk and don't forget to like, subscribe, tell a friend, share on social media – it helps us reach new listeners and we really do appreciate it :)
49:24 6/8/23
So Many Damn Books • Episode #143
So Many Damn Books is a show that aims to celebrate reading in all its forms, and to do so with a cocktail in hand. For over 200 episodes now Christoper Hermelin has been chatting to authors and crafting them bespoke drinks. From George Saunders and Ruth Ozeki to lesser-known but no less interesting authors, every episode in his archive is a delight. And it was no less of a delight to welcome him onto the Book Club Review podcast. So sit back and enjoy this very special episode, where you'll find out about a Stateside literary cult that's turns out to be an excellent resource should you need a new best friend, a book so good you'll end up dreaming about it, and how to cope when you've gone so deep into the reading world that you can no longer simply buy a book in a bookshop. Luckily, a problem shared is a problem halved, or at least a problem understood! Booklist Important Artifacts and Personal Property from the Collection of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris by Leanne Shapton  Skippy Dies by Paul Murray The Boy Detective Fails by Joe Meno Spangle by Gary Jennings Hestia Strikes a Match by Christine Grillo Notes Enjoyed this episode? In the mood for more? Head over to SMDB and listen to Christopher's episode here. Amongst other things we discuss the amazing KICK THE LATCH by Kathryn Scanlan, and lesser-known gem PARNASSUS ON WHEELS by Christoper Morely. Want to know more about the Tournament of Books? 2023 is here Or browse the ToB archive Keen to fall down a nostalgia rabbit hole? Try the Mac vs. PC commercials, but be aware it's half an hour of your life you won't get back. Admin If you’d like to see what we’re up to between episodes do follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or get in touch direct at thebookclubreview@gmail.com.  Website: https://www.thebookclubreview.co.uk Instagram post: [link coming soon] Newsletter sign-up: https://substack.com/@thebookclubreview Patreon: Coming soon… And if you enjoy our shows and want to do a nice thing in return please do leave us a quick star rating and review. Wondering how to do that? From apple podcasts click the '...' next to the episode title (under the square graphic) and choose 'go to show'. From there scroll down past the episodes till you find 'Ratings & Reviews'. Tap the stars to add a star rating, tap 'write a review' slightly further down to add a comment. Thank you!
43:23 5/31/23
Book Club: Victory City • #142
Salman Rushdie's most recent novel Victory City was published in February 2023 to much critical acclaim but, as ever here at the Book Club Review, we’re interested in what Laura’s book club made of it. Our friend and pod regular, journalist Philip Chaffee is here to report back, along with first-time guest, avid reader and keen book clubber Charlie Chichester. Listen in for our full and frank discussion, plus our recommendations for follow on reads, and the books we've currently got on the go. Book list Baudolino by Umberto Eco Gentlemen of the Road by Michael Chabon The Princess Bride by William Goldman How Westminster Works and Why it Doesn’t by Ian Dunt Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel Revolutionary Spring by Christopher Clark Parnassus on Wheels by Christopher Morley Enjoyed the show? Want to express your thanks? Here's how: From apple podcasts click the '...' next to the episode title (under the square graphic) and choose 'go to show'. From there scroll down past the episodes till you find 'Ratings & Reviews'. Tap the stars to add a star rating, tap 'write a review' slightly further down to add a comment. Thank you!
42:31 5/21/23
Bookshelf: Easter reads • Episode #141
Our Bookshelf episodes are the ones dedicated to the books we’re each reading outside of book club, the ones we tend to love because we chose them for ourselves. Laura has been reading the latest from ANIMAL LIFE, the latest novel from podcast favourite, Icelandic author Audur Ava Olafsdottir. A short, quiet novel, but one that struck a chord. She's also been happily working through THE MIRROR VISITOR QUARTET by French author Christelle Dabos. What is it about this epic fantasy series that has her so happily hooked? Kate has been catching up with LESSONS IN CHEMISTRY by Bonnie Garmus, the smash hit that tells of scientist turned tv-cooking show presenter Elizabeth Zott. Also on her stack is I HAVE SOME QUESTIONS FOR YOU, by Rebecca Makkai, the New York Times bestseller that has been described as ‘A twisty, immersive whodunit perfect for fans of Donna Tartt’s The Secret History.’ And for a non-fiction palette cleanser she's been reading Saving Time: Discovering Life Beyond the Clock, by artist and writer Jenny Odell. To read it, fellow time-philosopher Oliver Burkeman comments, ‘'is to experience how freedom might feel'. Listen in for all this plus the current reads and books we can't wait to get to, including SUPER-INFINITE by Katherine Rundell, STONE BLIND by Natalie Haynes and MISS PETTIGREW LIVES FOR A DAY buy Winifred Watson. And just why are Laura's book club struggling with Salman Rushdie's latest, VICTORY CITY? NOTES Whenever you listen to this episode if you have thoughts on it we’d love to hear them. Comment anytime on the episode page on our website thebookclubreview.co.uk, where you’ll also find full shownotes, book recommendations and a transcript. Comments there go straight to our inboxes so drop us a line, we always love to hear from you. You can also sign up for our bi-weekly-ish newsletter for extra reviews and recommendations, and find out about our Patreon stream, and how you can support us there. To see what we’re up to between episodes follow us on Instagram @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or get in touch at thebookclubreview@gmail.com. And if you enjoy our shows one other way to support us, as ever, is to tell your bookish friends and help us find new listeners.  
41:06 4/15/23
Free and The Snow Ball • Book Club, episode #140
We're joined by friend and journalist Phil Chaffee to discuss FREE by Lea Ypi, a memoir of her Albanian childhood and of life amid the collapse of Communism. The book won the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje prize and was shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford non-fiction prize and was on many a best-book of 2022 list. Both our book clubs read this one, but what did they make of it? We'll be reporting back. We’re also discussing THE SNOW BALL by Brigid Brophy, a swirling, sensual feast that takes place over one night at a New Year’s Eve masquerade ball. The novel was published in 1964 and was something of a scandalous sensation at the time. It has recently been re-released to much acclaim, but what did Kate's book club think of it? We’ll also have some trusty follow-on recommendations to help you find your next great read. Booklist BORDER by Kapka Kassabova SECONDHAND TIME by Svetlana Alexievich HOMELAND ELEGIES by Ayad Akhtar MISS PETTIGREW LIVES FOR A DAY by Winifred Watson 50 GREAT WORKS OF ENGLISH LITERATURE WE COULD DO WITHOUT by Brigid Brophy, Michael Levey and Charles Osborne. Let us know your thoughts, we love to hear from you. Find us on Instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email us at thebookclubrevew@gmail.com. You can also check out the episode page on our website, thebookclubreview.co.uk, where you'll also find full shownotes and a transcript. If you enjoy our shows please support us by telling your bookish friends – we love to reach new listeners.
41:45 4/5/23
Bookshopaholics: The Paperhound, Vancouver
When in Vancouver, run to the coolest bookstore you can find and interview the owner. Such is the busman's holiday I've recently been enjoying on a visit to Laura's hometown. It also fits nicely into a new series we've been cooking up where we get to indulge our love of independent bookshops. First up is The Paperhound, owned by Kim Koch and Rod Clarke, which offers a fine selection of used and rare, new and notable books. Join me as I chat to Kim and learn about the joys of book collecting and the time she found a signed first edition of Borges' Ficciones in a box of books left on the street. We'll be pulling out some treasures from her shelves and chatting about life in the strange and wonderful world of used-books. Book list A Little Book of Pussy Cats by Louis Wain Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein Aphrodisiacs in your Garden by Charles Connell Minor Detail by Adania Shibli Orwell’s Roses by Rebecca Solnit The Juniper Tree by Barbara Comyns Still Life with Woodpecker by Tom Robbins The Paperhound For full shownotes and episode transcript head to our website: The Book Club Review podcast If you’d like to see what we’re up to between episodes follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or get in touch at thebookclubreview@gmail.com. And if you enjoy our shows one other way to support us, as ever, is to tell your bookish friends and help us find new listeners.
35:33 3/19/23
Bookshelf: Spring Reads • Episode #138
Our bookshelf episodes are the ones where we kick back and talk about the books we’ve been choosing for ourselves outside of our book club reading. And so join us as we get swept away by the French Revolution and Hilary Mantel’s spellbinding book A PLACE OF GREATER SAFETY, consider myth and storytelling with a surprisingly feminist slant thanks to Salman Rushdie’s latest novel, VICTORY CITY, see another side to New York with our guest Phil Chaffee and Chang Rae Lee’s book NATIVE SPEAKER, plan an architectural tour of Norwegian Stave churches thanks to THE BELL AND THE LAKE by Lars Mytting, which Laura reports is a tale of love and drama set among a remote community in 18th-century Norway. We also catch up with Barack Obama’s summer reading pick THE SCHOOL FOR GOOD MOTHERS by Jessamine Chan – with a brief aside to celebrate Kate’s new-found love for Richard and Judy's book club here in the UK. Phil reports back on the FT’s business book of the year, CHIP WAR by Chris Miller, which turns out to be a thumping page-turner, plus we quick fire through a stack of other books we couldn’t bear not to mention. Book list A PLACE OF GREATER SAFETY by Hilary Mantel (Fourth Estate) VICTORY CITY by Salman Rushdie (Penguin) NATIVE SPEAKER by Chang Rae Lee (Granta) THE BELL AND THE LAKE by Lars Mytting (Hachette) THE SCHOOL FOR GOOD MOTHERS by Jessamine Chan CHIP WAR by Chris Miller (Simon & Schuster) Plus THE PEARL by John Steinbeck SHADOW AND CLAW by Gene Wolff CHARLOTTE by David Foenkinos ROSES IN THE MOUTH OF A LION by Bushra Rehman (published in the UK in January 2023, from St. Martin’s Press)   Notes Browse the newsletter archive of Three Lives & Company booksellers, New York.  Our  Emily's Walking Book Club episode # 76 The article Phil mentioned is The 25 Most Significant New York City Novels from the Last 25 Years  
48:38 3/7/23
Future reads 2023 • Episode #137
It’s always good to have things to look forward to in life, and the books we can see coming up on the horizon are no exception. In this episode we’ll be finding out the books that Chrissy Ryan and her team at Bookbar are excited about. Whether it’s new books from authors we here at the Book Club Review have loved in the past or exciting new debuts from authors we’ve never heard of, we’re primed and ready to get reading as soon as they drop. Plus we have a nerdy dive into what it takes to run a small independent bookshop, and why it’s so important to be reading ahead of the pack. Listen in and be prepared to add to your TBR. Book list Chrissy recommended Rosewater by Liv Little (Dialogue books / Hachette) Small Worlds by Caleb Azumah Nelson (Penguin) Wandering Souls by Cecile Pin (Harpercollins) Nothing Special by Nicole Flattery (Bloomsbury) The Happy Couple by Naoise Dolan (W&N) Mrs S by K Patrick (Europa Editions) Yellowface by R. F. Kuang (Harper Collins) The Guest, Emma Cline (Penguin) Fire Rush by Jacqueline Crooks (Penguin)   Lucy recommended Death of a Bookseller by Alice Slater (Hachette) In Memoriam by Alice Wynn (Penguin) Romantic Comedy by Curtis Sittenfeld   Chandler and Frankie recommended One Small Voice by Santanu Bhattacharya (Penguin) Penance by Eliza Clark (Faber) Collected Works by Lydia Sandgren (Pushkin) Tomás Nevinson, Javier Marías (Penguin) The Late Americans by Brandon Taylor (Penguin) And Frankie also mentioned Nothing Special by Nicole Flattery (Bloomsbury) In addition to bookselling Frankie is also author Francesca Reece and so you might also be interested to try her book Voyeur: 'Devastatingly witty, compulsively readable . . . like Sally Rooney meeting Martin Amis in Paris' writes Francine Toon, author of Pine. To sign up to read and review proofs head to Netgalley UK or Netgalley.com    Notes Check out the episode page on our website for full shownotes and a transcript, and do comment there anytime if you have thoughts on any of the books discussed in this show. You'll also find our archive of over one-hundred episodes to browse through, from our Booker Prize or Women’s Prize specials to regular book club chats and interviews with authors and other book industry folk. You can also sign up to our free newsletter for more book recommendations between shows, and find out the details for our Patreon account and how to support us there. A quick free way to support us is to take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you get your podcasts, it really helps us reach new listeners. Tell your friends, share on social media, it means so much to us when you do. You can also find us on Instagram @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com.  
33:03 2/20/23
Bookshelf: Winter Reads • Episode #136
It’s Bookshelf time here at The Book Club Review podcast, when we talk about the books we’re reading outside of book club, the ones we get to pick and choose for ourselves. And so listen in to find out what Laura thought of The Ginger Tree by Oswald Wynd, a lesser-known backlist gem, A Place of Greater Safety, Booker-winner Hilary Mantel’s immersive doorstop about the French revolution, and The Goblin Emperor, Katherine Addison’s blend of court intrigue, goblins and steampunk. Meanwhile I’m reporting back on Babel by R.F. Kuang, the bestselling fantasy epic set in 19th-century England, Our Wives Under the Sea by Julia Armfield, part bruisingly tender love story, part nerve-clanging submarine thriller, and Either / Or by Elif Batuman, the follow-on from her first novel The Idiot. It’s the continuing adventures of her protagonist, Harvard student Selin, and has been described as ‘a second year of love, sex, and books’. Whenever you listen to this episode if you have thoughts on it we’d love to hear them. Comment anytime on the episode page on our website thebookclubreview.co.uk, where you’ll also find full shownotes, book recommendations and a transcript. Comments there go straight to our inboxes so drop us a line, we’d love to hear from you. You can also sign up for our bi-weekly-ish newsletter for extra reviews and recommendations. If you’d like to see what we’re up to between episodes follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or get in touch at thebookclubreview@gmail.com. And if you’re not already do subscribe to us and take a moment to rate and review the show in your podcatcher of choice – it helps other listeners to find us and is a great way to support us.
43:34 1/29/23
The Thursday Murder Club • Episode #135
When a book sells upwards of five and a half million copies and film rights are snapped up by none other than Steven Spielberg it seems to us a special episode is in order. And so join us as we dive into, and attempt to make sense of, the publishing phenomenon that is The Thursday Murder Club, the cozy crime novel set in a retirement community by TV-producer and presenter-turned-author Richard Osman.  Join us as Kate and two very special guests give The Thursday Murder Club the book club treatment. Our first guest is author and friend-of-the-pod Colleen Hubbard, whose debut novel Housebreaking was published by Hachette last year and is out in paperback April 2023. She joined Kate over Zoom and brought along her friend Sue, a pilates instructor and keen reader, to help give us more insight into how older readers are responding to this book. Then it's back to Kate and Laura for a stack of our favourite follow-on crime reads, cozy or otherwise. If you haven't yet read The Thursday Murder Club don’t worry, we will not spoil the plot for you. What we will do is take a friendly but critical overview to see if we can fathom the secrets behind the book’s appeal Book recommendations The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse The Wych Elm by Tana French Death in the Stocks by Georgette Heyer The Red House Mystery by A.A. Milne Mouth to Mouth by Antoine Wilson Gaudy Night by Dorothy L. Sayers Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith A Murder is Announced by Agatha Christie Leonard and Hungry Paul by Rónán Hession. Notes The Thursday Murder Club is published by Penguin. Find out more about Colleen and her novel Housebreaking (Hachette) at Colleenhubbard.com The Thursday Murder Club audiobook is produced by Penguin Audio Whenever you listen to this episode if you have thoughts on it we’d love to hear them. Comment anytime on the episode page on our website https://thebookclubreview.co.uk, where you’ll also find full shownotes, book recommendations and a transcript. Comments there go straight to our inboxes so drop us a line, we’d love to hear from you. You can also sign up there for our bi-weekly-ish newsletter for extra reviews and recommendations. If you’d like to see what we’re up to between episodes follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReviewpodcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or get in touch at thebookclubreview@gmail.com. And if you’re not already, why not subscribe to us wherever you get your podcasts. If you want to support us please do take a moment to rate and review the show, which helps other listeners find us.
60:12 1/17/23
Best Books of 2022 • Episode #134
It's our best books of 2022, one of our favourite episodes to record as by this point we've done all the hard work of reading, now it's time to sit back and consider which, of all the books we read in 2022, were our very favourites. That might be a new release or it might be a backlist gem. We've also got the books that got us through difficult moments, the books that made us laugh or cry, and the ones we recommended and gave to friends. As we're nothing if not critical we've got some books that didn't quite live up to our expectations before we finally crown our top three books of 2022.  As snow falls gently around the shed, the fairy lights twinkle, the mulled wine is warm, and we discuss our favourite reads of 2022 with regular special guest, journalist Phil Chaffee. Books mentioned are listed below, but if you want to be surprised look away now. Book recommendations for Best Books of 2022 Favourite new release: Laura loved TRUST by Herman Diaz, Phil’s favourite (with also-rans The Marriage Portraitby Maggie O’Farrell and Love Marriage by Monica Ali) was THE SECRET LIVES OF CHURCH LADIES by Deesha Philyaw, while Kate loved SEVEN STEEPLES by Sara Baume (with honorable mentions Housebreaking by Colleen Hubbard and Briefly: A Delicious Life by Nell Stevens) Favourite backlist title: Phil picked THE BETROTHED by Alessandro Manzoni (with also-rans The Blackwater Lightship by Colm Toíbín, and Beware of Pity by Stefan Zweig). Kate loved The Homemaker by Dorothy Canfield-Fisher but her favourite was O CALEDONIA by Elspeth Barker. Laura went for WIVES AND DAUGHTERS by Elizabeth Gaskell. Favourite non-fiction reads: For Kate it was THE PALACE PAPERS, Tina Brown’s engaging examination of the British royal family and our collective fascination with (or indifference) to them. Kate’s also-rans were Fall by John Preston (did Robert Maxwell fall or was he pushed?), 4,000 Weeks by Oliver Burkeman (if we did but have the time to discuss it) and Entangled Life by Merlin Sheldrake (book everyone says is great turns out to be great). Laura only reads non-fiction when her book club forces her too, but luckily she did end up reading CASTE by Isabel Wilkerson, a book that changed her view of the world within the first fifty pages. Phil loved Putin’s People by Catherine Belton and Not One Inch by M.E. Sarotte, but his overall favourite was THE RED PRINCE by Timothy Snyder. Favourite Book Club reads. Top of the pile for Laura was MICHEL THE GIANT by Tété-Michel Kpomassie while Phil preferred EIGHT MONTHS ON GHAZZAH STREET by Hilary Mantel. Kate loved The Heart is a Lonely Hunterby Carson McCullers but her ultimate choice was LIGHT PERPETUAL by Francis Spufford Favourite comfort reads: For Phil it was EITHER/OR by Elif Batuman; he now only wants to read books narrated by her protagonist Selin. Laura escaped to a creepy Swiss hotel with THE SANATORIUM by Sarah Pearse while Kate sank into the arms of old friend E.M. Delafield with THE DIARY OF A PROVINCIAL LADY. A book that made us laugh or cry: For Kate it was A HEART THAT WORKS by Rob Delaney. Phil enjoyed THREE MEN IN A BOAT by Jerome K. Jerome (in audiobook form read by Hugh Laurie). Laura loved Small by Claire Lynch and The Sentence by Louise Erdrich, but her final choice was THE BREAD THE DEVIL KNEAD by Lisa Allen-Agostini A book we pressed on a friend: Runner-up for Phil was We Don’t Know Ourselves by Fintan O’Toole but his favourite was THE FREE WORLD by Louis Menand. Laura’s pick was THE SIXTEEN TREES OF THE SOMME by Lars Mytting Books we read that didn’t quite live up to our expectations: THE ABSOLUTE BOOK by Elizabeth Knox promised much for Laura but ultimately didn’t deliver. Phil really didn’t get on with A LITTLE LIFE by Hanya Yanigahara (and has *really* thought about why) and for Kate LIBERATION DAY by George Saunders didn’t quite meet the soaring heights of his other books. Overall Book of the Year: Laura’s standout was THE TREES by Percival Everett. Kate loved After Sappho by Selby Wyn Schwartz and The Door by Magda Szabó but her overall favourite read was LONESOME DOVE by Larry McMurtry. Phil meanwhile loved the Elena Ferrante Neopolitan quartet, but his overall book of the year is, as mentioned earlier, THE FREE WORLD by Louis Menand. A few other books we mention in passing: Golden Hill by Francis Spufford The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon Babel by R. F. Kuang A Place of Greater Safety by Hilary Mantel Utopia Avenue by David Mitchell The English Understand Wool by Helen DeWitt The Little Library Parties and The Little Library Christmas by Kate Young Find full shownotes and links to related podcast episodes at our website thebookclubreview.co.uk, where you'll also find a transcript and our comments forum. No matter when you listen to this episode you can always drop us a line there and let us know what you thought of it. Tell us your favourite reads of 2022, we'd love to hear about them. You can also sign up for our bi-weekly-ish newsletter and find out details of our new Patreon channel. To keep up with us between episodes follow us on Instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod, or email us at thebookclubreview@gmail.com. If you enjoyed this episode please don't forget an easy way to give something back is to let people know about the show, whether through a quick rating on your podcast app, or letting people know via social media. We really appreciate it.
69:38 12/27/22
The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida, My Phantoms and Eight Months on Ghazzah Street – what did our book clubs make of them?
We catch up with 2022 Booker Prize winner The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida by Shehan Karunatilaka. Kate may have loved it, when she read it for our Booker Prize special episode, but what did the rest of her book club make of it? And we catch up with two recent reads for Laura's book group. The first is My Phantoms, the most recent novel from critics favourite Gwendoline Riley. What's all the fuss about? And did Laura's book club agree it was worth the read? Next we consider Eight Months on Ghazzah Street, a lesser-known work from Hilary Mantel. The real question, it seems, when reading Hilary Mantel is 'why would you ever read anyone else?' Listen in to find out just what it was Laura's group loved so much. We also have a range of recommendations for follow-ons to try, or to read with your book club. Book recommendations Women and Power by Mary Beard Very Cold People by Sarah Manguso The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy Cold Enough for Snow by Jessica Au A Passage North by Anuk Arudpragasam Notes The audiobook of The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida is published by Bolinda Digital (P) Bolinda Publishing 2022, My Phantoms is published by Granta Audio and Eight Months on Ghazzah Street is published by W.F. Howes and all three are available via your preferred audiobook retailer or library app. If you enjoyed this episode catch up with our original take on The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida when we discussed it as part of our Booker Prize special episode. For reviews and recommendations between episodes come and find us over on Instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod, or email us at thebookclubreview@gmail.com, we always love to hear from you. If you'd like to support us, please do take a moment to rate and review the show, which helps us reach new listeners. And tell your book-loving friends, who might not have heard of us.
52:40 12/11/22
Fitzcarraldo Editions, with Jacques Testard • #132
Today's episode is a celebration of the joy we find in Fitzcarraldo Editions, an independent publishing house that makes no concessions towards mass appeal but instead offers up books that are consistently ambitious, imaginative and innovative. Their hallmark is their plain typographic covers that allow the words inside to speak for themselves. The editorial line maintained by publisher Jacques Testard since the beginning has reaped rewards and he now publishes four Nobel Prizewinning authors as well as Booker international and Pulitzer prize winners and shortlistees. Not bad for a small publishing house that was started in 2014 on a tiny budget with just one employee, Jacques himself. Listen in to hear the story of Fitzcarraldo - named after a film that celebrates a seemingly impossible endeavour - and how in only his second-ever Frankfurt book fair Jacques found himself negotiating a 12-way bidding war for the English-language rights to Secondhand Time by Nobel winner Sveltlana Alexievich. And, because it’s us, you’ll also get to hear about the books. What are our favourites? Which do we recommend? Why are so many of them sad? We’re joined by Sam MacAuslan, keen Fitzcarraldo reader, to uncover some gems from the list. Like all good things, this episode has been a while in the making but with Fitzcarraldo recently celebrating publishing their 100th book it seemed the perfect time to release it out into the world, we hope you enjoy it, and feel inspired to try a Fitzcarraldo or two. Books mentioned Things I Don’t Want to Know Deborah Levy Attention: A Short History by Joshua Cohen Limonov: The Outrageous Adventures by Emannuel Carrère Secondhand Time by Svetlana Alexievich (Bela Shayevich) Minor Detail by Adania Shibley (Elizabeth Jaquette) Fifty Sounds by Polly Barton Flights by Olga Tocarczuk (Jennifer Croft) Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead by Olga Tocarczuk (Jennifer Croft) The Books of Jacob by Olga Tocarczuk (Jennifer Croft) Primeval and Other Times by Olga Tocarczuk (Antonia Lloyd Jones) The Years by Annie Ernaux (Alison L. Strayer) Exteriors by Annie Ernaux (Tanya Leslie) Zone, Matthias Enard (Charlotte Mandell) Cold Enough for Snow by Jessica Au The Naked Don’t Fear the Water by Matthieu Aikins Hurricane Season by Fernanda Melchor (Sophie Hughes) Paradise by Fernanda Melchor (Sophie Hughes) The Netanyahus, Joshua Cohen Septology, Jon Fosse (Damion Searls) Notes The film Fitzcarraldo by Werner Herzog Deborah Levy interview in The White Review New Directions in the US Giramondo in Australia As for us Follow us on Instagram @BookClubReviewpodcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. Find shownotes, transcript and comments forum over on our website https://thebookclubreview.co.uk and drop us a line, let us know your thoughts on this episode, or tell us about a Fitzcarraldo book you love.  And if you’re not already do subscribe in your podcatcher of choice and never miss an episode. If you like what we do please help us out by rating and reviewing the show, which helps other listeners find us. Better yet please do share on your social channels, we're so happy to reach new ears and like with a good book recommendation, word-of-mouth is the best way. 
54:31 11/27/22

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