Show cover of The Book Club Review

The Book Club Review

Discussion, debate, even a little dispute – expect it all on The Book Club Review. Every month hosts Kate and Laura bring you a new episode. That could be Book Club where we chat about the book read most recently by one of our book clubs. It could be Bookshelf, an episode dedicated to the books we’re reading outside of book club – the ones we get to pick and choose. Or it could be an interview with a book club, bookshop or book lover. Whatever the topic, every episode features lively and frank reviews and recommendations.

Tracks

Book Club: The Hummingbird by Sandro Veronesi
Since publication in 2019 The Hummingbird, by Italian Sandro Veronesi (translated into English by Elena Pala), has wowed readers and fellow-authors alike. 'A gripping masterpiece', 'a life-affirming triumph' 'unforgettable'... Just what is all the fuss about? We’re joined by pod regular Phil Chaffee and first-timer Jo Norman, both members of Laura’s book club, to find out. We’ve also got four unmissable novels by international authors we think you should know about.  Booklist Marzahn, Mon Amour by Katja Oskamp (trans. Jo Heinrich) The Martin Beck novels by Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöo (Joan Tate) Periera Maintains by Antonio Tabucchi (Patrick Creagh) The Door by Magda Szabó (Len Rix) Family Lexicon by Natalia Ginsberg (Jenny McPhee) Have thoughts on this episode? Are you team Kate or team Laura? Whenever you listen to the show you can always let us know via the comments forum on our website. And don't forget to leave us a book recommendation, tell us one of your favourites. Follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. And if you’re not already, why not subscribe to us on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. If you like what we do please do take a moment to rate and review the show, and help other listeners find us.
45:32 10/02/2022
Bookshelf: the Autumn book report
Back together again after the summer, Kate and Laura are catching up on all the books they managed to get through. So listen in for their reactions to summer must-read Tomorrrow, Tomorrow and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin. They also covered three books from the Booker Longlist, Trust by Hernan Diaz, The Trees by Percival Everett and After Sappho by Selby Wynn Schwartz. And a couple of long reads: for Kate Lonesome Dove, Larry McMurtry's Pulitzer-winning novel about cowboys in the Old West, and a guilty pleasure fantasy read for Laura, Red Seas under Red Skies by Scott Lynch. Kate is also joined by author Colleen Hubbard to talk about her debut novel Housebreaking. An absorbing page-turner with some powerful themes, it's one we recommend for your TBR pile or book club. Plus we find out more about one of Colleen's all-time favourite reads, The Magician of Lublin. All that and some pod news: new theme music (composed specially for us), a Patreon account, and we share our projects and plans for where we want to take the show. Booklist Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin The Night Always Comes by Willy Vlautin Trust by Hernan Diaz After Sappho by Selby Wynn Schwartz The Trees by Percival Everett Red Seas under Red Skies by Scott Lynch Housebreaking by Colleen Hubbard The Magician of Lublin by Isaac Bashevis Singer Enjoyed the episode? Have thoughts? Whenever you listen to this show don't forget you can drop us a comment at the episode page on our website thebookclubreview.co.uk, where you'll also find full shownotes for all of the books we discussed in the ep. and a transcript.  For book recommendations between episodes follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, or on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod. We're working hard on our Patreon offer, and are looking forward to sharing it with in a future episode. Until then, thanks for listening and happy reading x
53:26 09/18/2022
Young Bloomsbury, with Nino Strachey • #126
Step back in time with us as Kate visits Charleston home of Vanessa Bell and important gathering place for the members of the Bloomsbury Group, that collection of writers and artists including Virginia Woolf that coalesced around Gordon Square in London. Undaunted by the ghosts of her relatives Nino Strachey, author of a new book, Young Bloomsbury, joins us to discuss the up-and-coming younger generation, such as writer Julia Strachey, sculptor Stephen Tomlin and photographer Cecil Beaton, who followed in their footsteps. Nino considers the interplay of creative inspiration that flowed between the generations, but also the spirit of tolerance and acceptance of different gender identities and chosen families that allowed these young creatives to flourish. Leave us a comment on our The Book Club Review website, where you'll also find more information on all the books mentioned, a transcript and our comments forum. Let us know your thoughts on the episode, or a Bloomsbury Group book that you love.  Follow us between episodes for regular reviews and book recommendations on Instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast, or on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod. Find Nino on Twitter or Instagram @NinoStrachey. Book recommendations Lytton Strachey by Michael Holroyd (Penguin) Eminent Victorians by Lytton Strachey Cheerful Weather for the Wedding by Julia Strachey Love Letters: Vita and Virginia (Penguin) Orlando by Virginia Woolf (Penguin) L.O.T.E. by Sheila von Reinhold (Jaracanda) All Passion Spent by Vita Sackville West (Penguin), which we talked about on episode 12. The Waves and To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf (Penguin) Sissinghurst: The Creation of a Garden by Sarah Raven A Boy at the Hogarth Press by Richard Kennedy (Slightly Foxed) Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh (Penguin) A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway (Penguin) Mrs Hemingway by Naomi Wood (Picador) The Paris Wife by Paula McLain (Virago)
40:12 08/07/2022
The Women's Prize 2022 • #125
We love a prize and we love a special episode, and so we’re delighted to have an excuse to get together to discuss the 2022 Women’s Prize shortlist and its winner, The Book of Form and Emptiness by Ruth Ozeki.  The Women’s Prize is the UK's annual book award that celebrates the best books written by women. Key criteria for the Prize are accessibility, originality and excellence in writing. Judges are asked to ignore the reviews, publicity spends, an author’s previous reputation, and any sense of ‘who deserves it’ to choose the novel that inspires them, moves them, makes them think – and that they admire and enjoy. And so listen in to hear our frank but friendly take on the shortlist, Ozeki’s big win, and whether we agree with the judges. Maybe you don’t have time to read them all and just want to read one? Leave it to us, we’ve got you covered. Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead Sorrow and Bliss by Meg Mason The Hand the Devil Knead by Lisa-Allen Agostini The Island of Missing Trees by Elif Shafak The Sentence by Louise Erdrich The Book of Form and Emptiness by Ruth Ozeki Have thoughts on this episode? Join us over on our website where you'll find the page for this episode, a transcript and our comments forum. Which of the shortlist was your favourite? Drop us a line and let us know. Follow us on Instagram and Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com.    
56:20 07/29/2022
The Inseparables, with Anna Baillie-Karas • 124
The Inseparables is a novel that was never published in Simone de Beauvoir's lifetime. The story goes she showed it to Jean-Paul Sartre and he held his nose. It tells of the intense childhood friendship between Sylvie and Andrée, who were Beauvoir's fictional models for herself and her real-life friend Zaza Lacoin. The translation is by Lauren Elkin, author of Flâneuse, and the book comes with an introduction by Deborah Levy, and an afterword by Sylvie le bon de Beauvoir, plus a captivating selection of letters and photographs from the Beauvoir archive. For this episode Kate was joined by Australian books podcaster Anna Baillie-Karas, in town taking short break from her own podcast Books on the Go. The perfect excuse, then, to read and discuss this powerful short book. But what did we make of it? Should you add it to your reading pile? And would it be a good one for book club? Listen in and find out. Unusually for us this episode does contain spoilers, so if you don't know anything about Simone de Beauvoir and want to read this without any foreknowledge bookmark this show for later and come back to it when you've read the book. We also have four book recommendations inspired by The Inseparables we think you will love. BOOKLIST Petronille by Amélie Northomb, translated by Amelia Anderson At the Existentialist Café by Sarah Bakewell Last Summer in the City by Gianfrarnco Calligarich, translated by Howard Curtis Parisian Lives by Deidre Bair NOTES Don't miss the episode page on our website for full shownotes, a transcript and comments forum where you can let us know your thoughts on the episode or recommend us a book. Comments there go straight to our inboxes and we will read and respond so do drop us a line, we love to hear from you. Follow us on Instagram and Facebook @bookclubreviewpodcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod, or email us at thebookclubreview@gmail.com Listen to Lauren Elkin and Deborah Levy discuss The Inseparables for the London Review of Books Listen to the Literary Friction podcast episode Kate mentioned, with Lauren Elkin
33:46 07/15/2022
Mrs Dalloway, with Charles Pignal • #123
Dull account of one woman’s day or rich and resonant masterpiece? Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf has divided readers since it was published and continues to spark debate today. In London, one day in June, 1923, society hostess Clarissa Dalloway sets out to buy flowers for a party she is giving that evening. Returning home later she is visited by an old friend, Peter Walsh, who rekindles memories and feelings from her youth. Meanwhile making his own path through London traumatised soldier, Septimus Smith, is finding everyday life a torment and his young Italian wife cannot help him. Although they never meet, the two stories interweave as Woolf captures her characters and London on the page. Join Kate and special guest, prolific reader and Instagram book reviewer  Charles Pignal as they dive into Dalloway and debate the results. Could Woolf have used a few less semi-colons? Can Kate talk about the book without weeping? If you haven’t read it, should you read it? Listen in for the answers to all these questions plus some great follow-on recommendations from Charles and from Kate and Laura picking up on the London theme. Whether you’re wondering what to read next for book club or just want some good additions to your own reading pile we have the book for you. Book list The Annotated Mrs Dalloway, with notes by Merve Emre In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellman The Waves by Virginia Woolf Young Eliot and Eliot After the Waste Land by Robert Crawford Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel White Teeth and Intimations by Zadie Smith Open Water by Caleb Azumah Nelson On Golden Hill and Light Perpetual by Francis Spufford The Duchess of Bloomsbury Street and 84 Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff A Week in December by Sebastian Faulks Queenie by Candice Carty Williams. Notes For more from Charles including reviews, his weekly books quiz, and author interviews find him on Instagram @charleslangip Have thoughts on this episode, or a book to recommend? Go to the episode page on our website where you'll find full show notes for all the books discussed, a transcript and a comments forum. Comments go straight to our inboxes so get in touch, we love to hear from you. You can also keep in touch between episodes on Instagram @BookClubReview podcast, or Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or drop us a line at thebookclubreview@gmail.com.
45:08 07/04/2022
Summer Reading special 2022
Whether you're soaking up Nutcrackers on Rockaway beach like Kate's book-reviewing heroine Molly Young, throwing down a picnic rug in your garden or the local park, fighting your way through airport chaos with the promise of a trip abroad or cosying up with a warm blanket in the Southern Hemisphere, we've got the Summer Reading show for you. It's packed full of recommendations including our own favourite beach reads and tips from booksellers, authors and other friends of the pod. So if you’re curious what show-regular Phil Chaffee is diving into this summer, what Emily Rhodes of Emily’s Walking Book Club is planning on reading, what Nadia Odunayo of book recommendations app The Storygraph thinks you should try, what onetime journalist now bookseller Tom Rowley is planning on reading when he gets a second off setting up his new bookshop, Backstory, and finally what one of our favourite authors, Ed Caesar, thinks might be the perfect page-turner for you, keep listening. So whether you're inclined towards the hottest new releases or the tried and tested classics (including several our guests love so much they return to them again and again), grab a notepad and listen in. If you enjoyed the show head over to our website to comment and let us know your favourite summer reads, we love to hear from you. Or follow us on Instagram @thebookclubreviewpodcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email us at thebookclubreview@gmail.com – want to help us out? Subscribe, drop us a review and tell your book-loving friends about the show. Book recommendations Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin The Field by Robert Seethaler Sea of Tranquility by Emily St. John Mandel Hot Milk by Deborah Levy Early Morning Riser by Katherine Heiny Lessons in Chamistry by Bonnie Garmus You Made a Fool of Death with your Beauty by Akwake Emezi A Lady’s Guide to Fortune Hunting by Sophie Irwin A Month in the Country by J.L. Carr Brother of the More Famous Jack by Barbara Trapido The Whalebone Theatre by Joanna Quinn News of the Dead by James Robertson Free by Lea Ypi Serious Money by Caroline Knowles The Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett The House of Niccolo sequence by Dorothy Dunnet We Don't Know Ourselves by Fintan O'Toole Gallant by V.E. Schwab Clockers by Richard Price Virtue by Hermione Hobie Neon in Daylight by Hermione Hobie Essex Dogs by Dan Jones (published 15 September 2022)
45:02 06/20/2022
Michel the Giant: An African in Greenland
Join us as we venture to the frozen north in the very enjoyable company of Tété-Michel Kpomassie, who left his home of Togo, West Africa to pursue his dream of living in Greenland. While we may not have been 100% sold on the cuisine, we were fascinated by his experiences and the unique perspective he brings to his observations about the society he encounters there. First published in English in 1981 the book was recently re-issued by Penguin as part of their Modern Classics series. But do we think it should have a place on your bookshelf? Listen in to find out. And because there are few things we love more than a polar book, we’ve got a stack of other suggestions for your reading pile, from previous pod favourites like A Woman in the Polar Night by Christine Ritter, to a new to us book called This Cold Heaven, by Gretel Erlich. So come, fix yourself a cup of coffee with reindeer fat, and let us tell you more.   Books discussed   The Northern Lights, The Amber Spyglass and The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman (His Dark Materials trilogy, [Scholastic]) The Memoirs of Stockholm Sven by Nathaniel Ian Miller (Hachette) This Cold Heaven by Gretel Erlich (Harper Collins) Prophets of Eternal Fjord by Kim Leine (and The Colony of Good Hope [Pan Macmillan]) Miss Smilla’s Feeling for Snow by Peter Høeg (Penguin).  A Woman in the Polar Night by Christiane Ritter. Keep in touch: No matter when you listen to this episode you can always comment via the episode page on our website, thebookclubreview.co.uk (where you'll also find the episode transcript). Comments there go straight to our inboxes so let us know your thoughts and we'll reply.  Follow us on Instagram Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook  
41:43 06/11/2022
The Year I Stopped to Notice by Miranda Keeling
This episode is all about finding the extraordinary in the everyday, in the little things that may pass us by if we don't pay attention. And so join us as we talk to Miranda Keeling about her book The Year I Stopped to Notice, a joyful, poignant and familiar portrait of everyday life that Neil Gaiman called 'beautiful' and Philip Pullman 'a delight'. Together with Miranda we also recommend six other books that tap into this spirit of observing and capturing moments. Booklist  Nobody Told You by Hollie McNish The Outrun by Amy Liptrot (and we also mentioned her latest book, The Instant) No-One Is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood Flâneuse by Lauren Elkin Leonard and Hungry Paul by Rónán Hession  The Year I Stopped to Notice is published by Icon Books and available to buy now. For more from Miranda you can find at mirandakeeling.com or go to the source and follow her on Twitter @mirandakeeling Enjoyed the episode? Drop us a line anytime and let us know your thoughts at our website thebookclubreview.co.uk. There you'll find a dedicated episode page, full shownotes for all the books we recommended, a transcript and a comments section where we encourage you to let us know your thoughts. We love to hear from listeners. You'll also find our archive of episodes to browse through, from Booker winners to little known gems from the backlist. Drop in on a spirited book club discussion or join us as we catch up on our recent reads. It's all there waiting for you. If you’d like to see what we’re up to between episodes follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com.  And if you’re not already do subscribe, rate and review wherever you get your podcasts, which help other listeners find us and brings us joy. Do share with your bookish friends, we love to reach new listeners.
31:12 05/31/2022
Bookshelf: From a literary thriller to a guilty pleasure fantasy read
Join us as we catch up on our recent reads outside of book club, the books we're picking and choosing for ourselves. Laura enjoys The Sixteen Trees of the Somme by Lars Mytting, declaring it 'unputdownable', and a good antidote to the brilliant but rather more serious novel The Sympathiser by Viet Thanh Nguyen (her Vancouver book club's pick). We're joined by journalist Phil Chaffee who shares his recent holiday reading, The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco and My Fourth Time We Drowned by Sally Hayden. Meanwhile Kate has fallen in love with O'Caledonia by Elspeth Barker and sneaks in This Savage Song by V.E. Schwab, a YA fantasy read that proves perfect for those times when you just want to read about things that aren't real. Book recommendations The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco Matrix by Lauren Groff The Sixteen Trees of the Somme by Lars Mytting Islands of Abandonment by Cal Flynn O’Caledonia by Elspeth Barker A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes My Fourth Time We Drowned by Sally Hayden The Naked Don’t Fear the Water by Matthieu Aikins The Sympathiser by Viet Than Nuygen This Savage Song, Our Dark Duet, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue and The Shades of Magic trilogy, all by V. E. Schwab Head over to the episode page on our website for full shownotes and do leave us a comment in the forum, we love to hear from you. If you are the first, don't be shy! Keep up with what we’re reading between shows on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or send us an email thebookclubreview@gmail.com.
36:50 05/14/2022
The Country of Others by Leïla Slimani
Author Salman Rushdie called it 'an exceptional novel' while Claire Messud 'didn't want it to end' but what did Laura's book club make of this first book in a new trilogy from French-Moroccan sensation Leïla Slimani?  We're joined by regular pod-listener Youssra, who gave us her insight into how the book has been received in her native Morocco. And we've got our usual round of book recommendations to help you find your next great read. Book recommendations Une année chez les français by Foud Laroui The Moor’s Account by Leila Lalami This Blinding Absence of Light by Tahar Ben Jelloun All Men Want to Know by Nina Bouraoui Year of the Elephant by Leila Abouzeid  Notes Have you read the book? Have an opinion on the show? Head to our episode page for full shownotes and episode transcript, and let us know your thoughts in the comments. They go straight to our inbox so we will respond – let's keep the discussion going. https://www.thebookclubreview.co.uk/portfolio/items/the-country-of-others/ Follow us on Instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast On Twitter @bookclubrvwpod Next episode: Join us as we deep dive into the world of Fitzcarraldo with Jacques Testard, publisher of elegant blue and white books that keep winning awards. If you're looking to find books that will challenge you and broaden your horizons, don't miss it.     
44:22 05/01/2022
Bookshelf: our latest reads
Our bookshelf shows are the ones where we get to cut loose and follow our own preferences, so listen in as Kate tries to figure out the best way to show up for her life after reading Oliver Burkeman’s 4,000 Hours. Meanwhile Laura is drawn into ’A dark world of desire and fantasy’ with French prizewinner No Touching by Ketty Rouf, we figure out via an emergency call to an Irish friend how to pronounce Colm Tóibín, but unfortunately this doesn't help Kate in her struggle with his book about Thomas Mann, The Magician. Laura gets on better with Brit Bennett's book The Mothers, which she can't put down. Finally, Kate has a new girl-crush on Canadian author Sheila Heti after reading her book Motherhood. Booklist 4,000 weeks by Oliver Burkeman No Touching by Ketty Rouf The Magician by Colm Toíbín Motherhood by Sheila Heti The Mothers by Brit Bennett Laura also mentioned Savage Tongues by Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi, Little by Edward Carey and Secrets of the Sprakkar by Eliza Reid. Get in touch with us and tell us what you’re reading or recommend us a book on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. Find our full episode archive at thebookclubreview.co.uk and don't forget to like, subscribe, tell a friend, share on social media – it helps us reach new listeners and we really do appreciate it :)
47:49 04/09/2022
Motherhood • with Claire Lynch
It's Mother's Day here in the UK and as there's nothing Kate loves more than a special episode we've put together a show on the theme of Motherhood. We're joined by Claire Lynch, author of Small: On Motherhoods, her literary memoir of her own unusual journey into motherhood. Elizabeth Morris of Crib Notes book club joins us too – who better to help us pull together our essential reads on the topic. We've got laughter, we might shed a few tears, and brilliant books to cover all eventualities. BOOKLIST Small: on motherhoods, by Claire Lynch Nightbitch by Rachel Yoder Motherhood by Sheila Heti A Life’s Work by Rachel Cusk A Ghost in the Throat by Doireann ní Ghríofa M(otherhood) by Praya Agarwal The Best Most Awful Job by Katherine May The Lost Daughter by Elena Ferrante The Home-Maker by Dorothy Canfield Fisher Life Among the Savages by Shirley Jackson No-One Talks About this Stuff by Kat Brown NOTES Follow Claire on Twitter @drclairelynch, and find Elizabeth @Elizabethmoya. You can sign up for her monthly newsletter Crib Notes here. Follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. Check out our full episode archive on our website www.thebookclubreview.co.uk. Do subscribe to us to be sure you never miss an episode. And if you like what we do please rate and review the show, it helps other listeners find us. If you want to go one better please spread the word about us on your social media channels. Reaching new listeners makes us so happy, we treasure each and every one, and your support helps us do that.
53:09 03/27/2022
What to read and when, with Francesca Beauman
Book recommendations galore from author Francesca Beauman, who is also publisher and bookshop proprietor of Persephone Books. In her latest book, The Literaray Almanac, Francesca aims to guide readers in choosing books that chime with moments in the year – from hopeful books to read in March to school curriculum classics not-nearly-as-boring-as-you-remember them in September. We also explore the delights of the Persephone publishing list with old favourites and some exciting new titles. So listen in and share in the joy of giving ourselves permission to say when we don't like something, and turn instead to something we will love. Enjoy. Booklist The Pineapple, King of Fruits and Matrimony, Inc., by Francesca Beauman The Waiting Years by Fumiko Enchi Ulysses by James Joyce The Home-Maker by Dorothy Canfield Fisher The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald Someone at a Distance by Dorothy Whipple The Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu  As It Was by Helen Thomas A Well Full of Leaves by Elizabeth Myers The Diary of a Provincial Lady by E. M. Delafield Normal People by Sally Rooney Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders Notes Find out more about Francesca at her website francescabeauman.com, or head on over to persephonebooks.co.uk for a browse. Follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email us thebookclubreview@gmail.com and let us know what you're reading – we love to hear from you.  Subscribe to us to be sure you never miss an episode, and if you like what we do please rate and review the show, it helps other listeners find us and we are eternally grateful.
30:20 03/23/2022
Bookshelf: from prizewinning literature to beachy bestsellers
Join us as we discuss Benjamin Labatut's Booker International shortlisted novel When We Cease to Understand the World, 2020 Baillie Gifford prizewinner One, Two, Three, Four: The Beatles in Time by Craig Brown and 2021 Costa biography prizewinner Fall: A Life of Robert Maxwell by John Preston, The Outlander by Gil Adams, The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab and The Sanitorium by Sarah Pearse. Did we love them? Did we loathe them? Listen in to find out. Booklist When We Cease to Understand the World, Benjamín Labatut One, Two, Three, Four: The Beatles in Time by Craig Brown Fall: A Life of Robert Maxwell by John Preston The Outlander by Gil Adams The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V.E. Schwab The Sanitorium by Sarah Pearse Notes Get Back film trailer Carpool Karaoke with Sir Paul McCartney Join the bookish conversation with us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. Do subscribe to us on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. You can support us by rating and reviewing the show, and most importantly by telling your friends. Please share on social media and help us reach new listeners. Full show notes and our complete episode archive at our website thebookclubreview.co.uk. Sign up for our bi-weekly-ish newsletter. Drop us a line and let us know what you are reading. We always love to hear from you.
43:49 03/06/2022
Long reads
We’ve all felt the lure of the short, sweet read, one of those slim books you can finish in a few hours, maybe over a hot cup of tea. But what about the books that may take weeks, even months, to read? The door stoppers, the heavy weights, the long reads. Think Dickens, Tolstoy, and George Eliot, think Hilary Mantel, David Foster Wallace, and Donna Tartt. We dive into The Magic Mountain, Thomas Mann's 226,000 book set in a sanitorium in the Swiss Alps in which not much happens. What did we think of it? Should you try it? And if not, what long books do we recommend? We're joined by Toby Brothers of the London Literary Salon and pod-regular Phil Chaffee as we discover the pleasures and perils that come with a book that takes weeks, even months, to read. Books mentioned A Little Life by Hanya Yanigahara War & Peace by Leo Tolstoy all seven volumes of Proust Ulysses by James Joyce The Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Middlemarch by George Eliot The Books of Jacob by Olga Tocarczuk Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellman Pilgrimage by Dorothy Richardson The Alex Ross article Phil mentions is here. Follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. Subscribe to us to be sure you never miss an episode. And if you like what we do please rate and review the show, it helps other listeners find us. If you want to go one better please spread the word about us on your social media channels. Reaching new listeners makes us so happy, we treasure each and every one, and your support helps us do that.
47:51 02/27/2022
Upcoming reads: books to get excited about in 2022
Wondering what books 2022 has in store for you? What will be your next great read? We're joined by industry insiders Chrissy Ryan, of dream bookshop Bookbar, and Elizabeth Morris of the Crib Notes newsletter to talk what's hot and what to look forward to. We've got your #tbr future-proofed. Book list:  Beautiful World Where Are You by Sally Rooney Brown Girls by Daphne Palasi Andreades The Heavens and The Men by Sandra Newman A Little Life and To Paradise by Hanya Yanigahara Violets by Alex Hyde Love, Marriage by Monica Ali House of Sky and Breath by Sarah J. Maas Lapvona by Otessa Moshfegh Free Love by Tessa Hadley Salt Slow and Our Wives Under The Sea by Julia Armfield Wahala by Nikki May Check out the episode page on our The Book Club Review website for more. If you like this show please take a moment to rate and review, it really helps us reach new listeners. Tell your friends, share on social media, it means so much to us when you do. Follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com.
44:59 02/12/2022
The Promise by Damon Galgut
Dazzling, original, heartfelt and exhilarating, or bleak, depressing, incoherent and unrealistic? What did Kate's book club make of The Promise, Damon Galgut's Booker-winning novel, which tells the story of one white South-African family, and the promise made to their black servant, Salome. Join us as we discuss the book with Stuart Marshall and listen out for our follow-on book recommendations, from Trevor Noah's Born A Crime to Claire Keegan's impactful novella Small Things Like These.
42:05 02/03/2022
Book club: Lolly Willowes and The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
Charmingly eccentric tale with a sharply feminist point of view or a 'hot mess' – what did Laura's book club make of Lolly Willowes by Silvia Townsend Warner? Meanwhile The Heart is a Lonely Hunter Carson McCullers explores loneliness, the human need for understanding and the search for love. What did Kate's book club think. Should you pick it up? Listen in to find out. We also discuss Furious Hours by Casey Cep and A Start in Life by Anita Brookner. Robert McCrumb's 100 Best Novels Written in English  1 in 5 does not represent over 300 years of women in literature: Rachel Cooke's response. Join the conversation between episodes: follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. If you like what we do, please pass it on, share the episode link on social media, and help us spread the word.
41:28 01/16/2022
Best books of 2021 Part 2: Our books of the year
It's part 2 of our end-of-year special, in which we look back over the books we read outside of book club, the ones we chose for ourselves, and pick out our favourites. And so listen in for more book recommendations than you can shake a stick a, plus recommendations from our book clubs and friends of the pod. We also look ahead to some new releases coming out in 2022. Booklist Kate's top three favourites from 2021 Don't Touch My Hair, Emma Dabiri A Ghost in the Throat, Doireann ní Ghrí­ofa Lean, Fall, Stand, Jon McGregor   Laura's top three favourites from 2021 A Life's Work, Rachel Cusk Miss Iceland, Audur Ava Olafsdottir Indian Horse, Richard Wagamese   Kate's longlist of favourite reads in 2021 The Moth and the Mountain, Ed Caesar Writers and Lovers and Euphoria Lily King Real Estate, Deborah Levy The Library Book and The Orchid Thief, Susan Orlean All My Friends are Superheroes, Andrew Kaufman Owls of the Eastern Ice, Jonathan C. Slaght Nightbitch, Rachel Yoder Don't Touch My Hair, Emma Dabiri Fun Home, Alison Bechdel Parisan Lives, Deidre Bair Nightbitch, Rachel Yoder Early Morning Riser, Katherine Heiny Love Letters, Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West (Alison Bechdel, ed.) A Ghost in the Throat, Doireann ni Ghriofa Re-Educated, Lucy Kellaway Pew, Catherine Lacey Happy All the Time, Laurie Colwin Whereabouts, Jhumpa Lahiri Sorrow and Bliss, Meg Mason Lean, Fall, Stand, Jon McGregor Assembly, Natasha Brown The Stranding, Kate Sawyer The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers Empire of Pain, Patrick Radden-Keefe Matrix, Lauren Groff The See-Through House, Shelley Klein   Laura's longlist of favourite reads in 2021 His Only Wife, Peace Adzo Medie Miss Iceland, Hotel Silence and Butterflies in November, Audur Ava Olafsdottir Indian Horse, Richard Wagamese On Earth We Are Briefly Gorgeous, Ocean Vuong Homeland Elegies, Ayad Akhtar No-One is Talking About This, Patricia Lockwood Great Circle, Maggie Shipstead D: A Tale of Two Worlds, Michael Faber Graceling, Kristin Cashore A Deadly Education and The Last Graduate by Naomi Novik The Annals of the Western Shore, Ursula Le Guin The Book of Hidden Things, Francesco Dimitri Frederica, Georgette Heyer Conundrum, Jan Morris A High Wind in Jamaica, Richard Hughes The Rules of Civility, Amor Towles   Chrissy Ryan's recommendations Open Water, Caleb Azumah Nelson Assembly, Natasha Brown Detransition Baby, Torrey Peters Elizabeth Morris' recommendations Nightbitch, Rachel Yoder   Book club recommendations The Summer Book, Tove Jansson The Mermaid of Black Conch, Monique Roffey Whereabouts, Jhumpa Lahiri The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Anne Brontë A Dance to the Music of Time, Anthony Powell The Siege of Krishnapur, J. G. Farrell The Line of Beauty, Alan Hollinghurst Isaac Steele and the Forever Man, Daniel Rigby Braiding Sweetgrass, Robin Wall Kimmerer Albert and the Whale, Philip Hoare Trieste or the Meaning of Nowhere, Jan Morris The Bass Rock, Evie Wyld Autumn, Ali Smith The Underground Railroad, Colson Whitehead Small Things Like These, Claire Keegan The Offing, Benjamin Myers Circe, Madeleine Miller Three Women, Lisa Taddeo My Dark Vanessa, Kate Elizabeth Russell Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid   Upcoming books in 2022 We also discussed our inordinate desire for The Doors of Stone by Patrick Rothfuss to finally be published, and Sea of Tranquility by Emily St. John Mandel Notes Full details of all the titles discussed in this episode can be found in the shownotes on our website thebookclubreview.co.uk.  Do keep up with us between episodes on Instagram and Facebook @bookclubreviewpodcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. We always love to hear from you.
65:45 12/27/2021
Best books of 2021 Part 1: best book club books
In part one of our 2021 end-of-year special episode we look back over the books we’ve covered for book club. Which ones have stayed with us? Which were our stand outs? And which are we going to crown our book club book of the year. Whether you're looking for your next book club read or just a great book for your personal reading pile, don't miss it. We also look forward to new book club plans and projects for the coming year. For our best books of 2021 (from our own personal reading piles) go to Part 2, available in your podcast feed now. Booklist Writers and Lovers, Lily King Early Work, Andrew Martin Euphoria, Lily King Shuggie Bain, Douglas Stuart The Mermaid of Black Conch, Monique Roffey Mrs Death Misses Death by Salena Godden A Lonely Man, Chris Power (recommended by Gary) The Remains of the Day, Kazuo Ishiguro Like a Sword Wound by Ahmet Altan I Will Never See the World Again by Ahmet Altan How Beautiful We Were by Imbolo Mbue, As Meat Loves Salt by Maria McCann and The Barsetshire Chronicles by Anthony Trollope (Phil's recommendations) Second Place by Rachel Cusk Matrix by Lauren Groff Full shownotes are on our website thebookclubreview.co.uk, where you can browse our full episode archive and sign up for our bi-weekly-ish newsletter, full of recommendations and bookish links. Keep up with us between episodes on Instagram and Facebook @bookclubreviewpodcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. We always love to hear from you.  
48:56 12/27/2021
Kate Sawyer and The Stranding • 108
Join us as we talk all things books, apocalypses, whales and the Costa Prize shortlist with Kate Sawyer, author of The Stranding. It's a novel about a woman who survives the end-of-the-world by hiding inside the belly of a whale. Find out why we loved it, as we consider its place in the canon of apocalypse novels from Z for Zachariah to The Road. We've also got a ton of book club recommendations, find out what Kate's been reading recently and have some follow-on read suggestions for when you've finished The Stranding. Book list Moby Dick by Herman Melville The Road by Cormac McCarthy Children of the Dust by Louise Lawrence Z for Zachariah by Robert C. O'Brien Nights at the Circus and Wise Children by Angela Carter Matrix and Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff Larry’s Party and Unless by Carol Shields Assembly by Natasha Brown Still Life by Sarah Winman Wahala by Nikki May (out Spring 2022) Burntcoat by Sarah Hall The Smallest Man by Frances Quinn Weather by Jenny Offill Humankind by Rutger Bregman The Life of the Mind by Christine Smallwood Follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. Don't miss our website where you can find our archive of over 100 shows to browse through. Don’t miss our recent Booker Prize special, or our discussion of Lauren Groff’s latest book Matrix and find out why we just can’t stop thinking about nuns. You can also find our library of articles including our recent one on our favourite book podcasts. And you can sign up to our bi-weekly newsletter for book reviews, recommendations and more.
44:58 12/12/2021
Matrix by Lauren Groff • 107
Join us as we dive, in spoiler-free fashion, into Lauren Groff's latest novel, Matrix. It tells of Marie de France, a cast-off from Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine's court, exiled to be a prioress at a run-down Abbey inhabited by starving nuns. Devastated and grieving the young Marie thinks only of regaining the queen's favour and returning to court. Gradually, though, she comes to see that if she is to stay, she must change, and the Abbey with her. The book has been a New York Times bestseller and National Book Award finalist but what did Laura's book club think? We're joined by pod-regulars Phillip Chaffee and Sarah Oliver to discuss it.
49:19 11/27/2021
The 2021 Booker Prize • #106
Join us as we discuss the 2021 Booker shortlist in typical book club style, with journalist Phil Chaffee and Chrissy Ryan, owner of Bookbar. We livestream the Booker ceremony so you can catch our immediate reactions to the winner. Did we agree? Was there a book we loved more? Was there one we loathed? Whether we loved them or loathed them, as ever, you can be assured of good debate. We thoroughly recommend any and all of these books for a good read and good discussion. Notes The Paris Review article on Anuk Arudpragasam Phil mentions is here Click here if you're wondering what a nudibranch looks like? Check out our website for our episode archive and more. Follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. Tell us what you’re reading for book club right now – we love to hear from you. If you've enjoyed this episode please leave us a quick online review, it helps other listeners find us :)    
59:04 11/05/2021
Second Place by Rachel Cusk
It's our latest Book Club episode, and we're discussing Rachel Cusk's latest novel, Second Place. It was longlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize, but didn’t make the cut for the shortlist. Sally Rooney calls it ‘masterful’, saying it ‘achieves a kind of formal perfection’ while the Observer newspaper lauds it as ‘A landmark in twenty-first-century English literature.' But what did Laura’s book club make of it? And who would we rather have to dinner, Rachel Cusk or Deborah Levy? Listen in to find out. Book recommendations To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf The Outline trilogy, by Rachel Cusk, read on audio by Kristen Scott Thomas Things I Don’t Want to Know by Deborah Levy The Sorrows of Young Werther by Goethe The audiobook of Second Place by Rachel Cusk is published by Faber & Faber and narrated by Kate Fleetwood. It’s available for download now. Listen to the Rachel Cusk interview Phil mentioned at the Edinburgh Literary Festival Find our full episode archive and sign-up link for our newsletter at our The Book Club Review website. Follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. And if you’re not already, why not subscribe to us on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. If you like what we do please help spread the word and tell a book-loving friend about our show. 
49:21 10/09/2021
104. Bookshelf: Back-to-school reads
We've shaken the sand from our flip-flops and put our suitcases away. Now it's back to business as Kate and Laura catch up on their recent reads, everything from this year's Booker International Prize winner to a fantasy romp about teenage wizards. Booklist Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong At Night All Blood is Black by David Diop Mud and Stars by travel writer Sara Wheeler A Deadly Education by Naomi Novik Re-Educated by Lucy Kellaway We also discuss the property website themodernhouse.com if you’d like to see what we’re up to between episodes check out the website at www.thebookclubreview.co.uk, find us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or email thebookclubreview@gmail.com. Drop us a line and tell us what you’re reading, we always love to hear from you. Next episode: Book club on Second Place by Rachel Cusk
43:09 09/27/2021
Close-up: Adam Ashton and Adam Jones
"Ashto" and "Jonesy" are two Australians who devour books on everything from self-improvement to business and marketing for their weekly podcast, What You Will Learn. They’ve recently launched their own book, The Sh*t They Never Taught You. They joined Kate to discuss what books have taught them, and provide her with some personal bibliotherapy to kick her out of her counter-productive ways. Listen in to find out what you can learn.
24:42 09/18/2021
Bookshelf: Summer Reading 2021
It's our 2021 Summer Reading episode! What are we looking for in our summer reading? We want books that are going to carry us away, books that are immersive and compelling, books that take us places and teach us things. Sometimes we want short reads to suit our mood, others we want long immersive books that will last us through the summer. And as ever, we want books we can discuss and debate. Embracing our usual tendency to veer away from the obvious we've compiled an eclectic list. We’ve got summer buzz books The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalila Harris and Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead, but we’re also delving into mental health with Meg Mason’s hilarious and moving novel Sorrow & Bliss, considering the joys of the untethered life with Jhumpa Lahiri and learning about the Sackler family – architects, it turns out, of America’s opioid crisis – with Patrick Radden-Keefe’s Empire of Pain. Plus Laura throws in Michael Faber’s beguiling fantasy novel D: A Tale of Two Worlds, a novel by First Nations author Richard Wagamese she wants everyone to read, and we briefly consider Erik Larson’s gripping history of World War 2, The Splendid and the Vile and why really it’s the perfect thing to have beside your deckchair. Wherever you are we wish you a brilliant summer and lots of happy reading. Booklist Sorrow & Bliss by Meg Mason Hotel Silence by Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir Whereabouts by Jhumpa Lahiri Empire of Pain by Patrick Radden-Keefe D (a Tale of Two Worlds) by Michael Faber The Book of Hidden Things by Francesco Dimitri Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalia Harris Great Circle by Maggie Shipstead You can also find full details plus a few extras on our website, thebookclubreview.co.uk. And if you’re so inclined you can also sign up for our bi-weekly newsletter there. It has reviews and recommendations and is full of reading inspiration to tide you over until our next episode. Follow us between episodes on Instagram @bookclubreviewpodcast, on twitter and facebook @bookclubrvwpod or email us at thebookclubreview@gmail.com – do drop us a line and tell us what you’re reading, we always love to hear from you. Special thanks to Mason Dietrich, our new Production assistant.
45:15 08/13/2021
Like a Sword Wound by Ahmet Altan
Looking for something a little off the beaten path for your reading pile? Join us as we discuss Like A Sword Wound by renowned Turkish writer Ahmet Altan. It's the first volume in a quartet and traces not only the social currents of the final years of the Ottoman Empire but also the erotic and emotional lives of its characters. Like A Sword Wound has been described as the Turkish War & Peace. Did Laura's book club agree? We're joined by journalist Philippe Chaffee to discuss it. Like A Sword Wound is translated by Brendan Freely and Yelda Türedi Book recommendations The Passenger magazine on Turkey Beyond the Walls by Nazim Hikmet My Name is Red and The Museum of Innocence by Orhan Pamuk Laurence in Arabia by Scott Anderson Palace Walk by Naguib Mahfouz War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy We also mentioned authors Elif Batuman and Elif Shafak. For full show notes go to www.thebookclubreview.co.uk where you can also sign up to our bi-weekly newsletter, which has reviews, links and plenty of bookish inspiration to keep you going between episodes. Follow us on Instagram or Facebook @BookClubReview podcast, on Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or drop us a line at thebookclubreview@gmail.com. Subscribe to us wherever you get your podcasts. If you like what we do please do take a moment to rate and review the show, it helps other listeners find us.
41:52 07/30/2021
100: Kate and Laura answer your questions
In celebration of our 100th episode we turn the spotlight on ourselves a little more than usual to answer listeners' questions. From our favourite childhood reads to the books that shaped us as adults, from books which kept us up all night to books we disagree on (with a shocking mid-show revelation from Laura that threatens to derail the whole discussion), listen in to learn more about us as readers and how we came to make the podcast.  Find our full show notes for this episode plus archive of all our past shows on our website, follow us on Instagram and Facebook @bookclubreviewpodcast or Twitter @bookclubrvwpod or drop us an email at thebookclubreview@gmail.com and tell us about a book you love. Booklist Childhood reads The Jungle Book and The Second Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling The Chalet School books by Elinor M. Brent Dyer The Wind in the Willows, Kenneth Grahame Little Women by Louisa May Alcott Miss Happiness and Miss Flower and Little Plum by Rumer Godden Mrs Frisby and the Rats of Nimh by Robert C. O’Brien Dark Canyon by Louis L’Amour A Devil to Ride by Patricia Leitch Cobbler’s Dream by Monica Dickens Howl’s Moving Castle and other books by Diana Wynne Jones The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper White Boots, Ballet Shoes, Theatre Shoes, Hollywood Shoes by Noel Streatfield   Transition books To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien   General books Night Flight by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry The Prophets of Eternal Fjord by Kim Leine Mrs Death Misses Death by Salena Godden Normal People by Sally Rooney The Moth and the Mountain by Ed Caesar The Time-Travellers Wife by Audrey Niffenneger Watership Down by Douglas Adams Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart The Red Tent by Anita Diamant The Idiot by Elif Batuman Sorrow and Bliss by Meg Mason The Ascent of Rum Doodle by W. E. Bowman Happy All the Time by Laurie Colwin The Neapolitan Quartet by Elena Ferrante The Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo Miss Iceland by Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir Parisian Lives by Deidre Bair The Rest is Noise by Alex Ross West With the Night by Beryl Markham Travels by Michael Crichton
48:51 07/17/2021