Show cover of Viewscapes

Viewscapes

Stories from Washington State Magazine—connecting you to Washington State University, the state, and the world. We'll take you into the lives, research, and experiences of the WSU community, where Cougs from all over talk with us about everything from new ideas and fascinating memories to books and food.

Tracks

Sweet beats with the Cougar Marching Band
The WSU Fight Song, the roaring crowd, the electric atmosphere.Washington State University’s Cougar Marching Band is often the heart and soul that connects WSU alumni and fans at these games.In this episode, new Cougar Marching Band director Jon Sweet takes magazine associate editor Adriana Janovich behind the scenes. He talks about the music, the marching, the fans, and the incredible Coug spirit in the band.This episode’s music is from the Cougar Marching Band at a November 2023 football game. The Cougar Marching Band is raising money for new uniforms. Learn more or donate for the uniforms.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
23:46 2/29/24
TikTok Rx: Youth turn to social media for health advice
Young people have lots of questions about diet, exercise, and sexual health. TikTok is one of their most trusted venues for finding out information.“They’ll go to TikTok and ask questions,” says Nicole O’Donnell, assistant professor at Washington State University’s Edward R. Murrow College of Communication. “They’re learning about health mostly through other people’s stories rather than some of the traditional health information you might get online.”But are they getting good health advice? In a recent study, O’Donnell analyzed health content on TikTok. Influencers with motivational stories were prevalent, while content from credentialed health providers was lacking.In this episode, she talks with Washington State Magazine science writer Becky Kramer about the potential pitfalls of teens relying on influencers for health information—particularly if the influencers are selling products.O’Donnell also has advice for public health officials working on teen outreach. Short TikTok videos are effective at reaching young people. And personal stories count, she says.  Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
15:19 1/30/24
Weather Watch: Reflecting on a Year of Extremes with Nathan Santo Domingo
2023 was a year of weather extremes, with damaging floods, fires, and storms unfolding across the globe.The United States logged a historic number of billion-dollar weather disasters, while smoke from Canada’s wildfires choked parts of the country.“It’s kind of odd to be talking about our neighbor just to the north, but they really did have such a big impact in North America and also globally,” says Nathan Santo Domingo, a field meteorologist with Washington State University’s AgWeatherNet.Besides the highest ever reported number of acres burned, the Canadian wildfire season was unusual for its longevity. “Wildfire season got going in late spring and didn’t relent until early fall.”The Pacific Northwest, in contrast, had its second highest number of recorded fire starts, but a smaller than average number of acres burned.Santo Domingo discusses the conditions behind 2023’s extreme weather and how some of those events are affecting food prices with Washington State Magazine science writer Becky Kramer. He also talks about the Northwest’s forecast for 2024.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
23:11 1/12/24
Feeding our ethics: A conversation about food and values with Samantha Noll
A simple decision about what to order for lunch can have profound effects on others.“Food is interesting because it touches so many other communities,” says Samantha Noll, an associate professor of bioethics in the School of Politics, Philosophy, and Public Affairs at Washington State University. “When we decide that we're going to eat that falafel sandwich, or that burger, or that salad, we're impacting others with that seemingly simple choice.”In this episode, Noll talks with Washington State Magazine writer Becky Kramer about how her childhood on a farm shaped her views of food and some of the environmental and socio-political implications behind our food choices.Noll recounts how wealthy New Yorkers forced immigrants to give up keeping livestock, triggering the Piggery War. She discusses the complicated history of avocados in the United States and the “food miles” traveled to bring people their daily cup of coffee or piece of chocolate.Noll encourages people to eat mindfully, considering how their decisions around food can align with their values.Some of Samantha Noll’s favorite food podcasts:The SporkfulGastropod - Food with a side of science and historyA Taste of the Past - Where food, culture, and history meeting in a podcastSupport the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
34:38 10/26/23
Restoring Palouse prairie: A field trip with Chris Duke
Palouse prairie of eastern Washington and northwestern Idaho is an endangered landscape. It’s dominated by forbs—flowering plants—that cover the fields with a riot of color that attracts native pollinators.The Phoenix Conservancy is among the groups restoring Palouse prairie. Led by Chris Duke, a doctoral graduate in biology from Washington State University, the organization works to bring native plants back to endangered landscapes from Madagascar to the Great Plains of North America to the Palouse hills.In this episode, Washington State Magazine editor Larry Clark takes a field trip with Duke to the apartment complexes on the edge of Pullman, Washington, where a half-acre hillside shows how Palouse prairie can thrive even on a small, urban piece of land. They call it a pocket prairie.As sounds from construction of new buildings surround the area, Duke shows off the blue asters, purple lupine, and myriad other native plants as butterflies and pollinating beetles move from flower to flower. It is a sign of hope and the resilience of native species in the region.Read more in “Rooting for the prairie” in the Fall 2023 issue of Washington State Magazine.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
17:37 10/10/23
Tongues of Fire: Poetry and piano
Eric McElroy is an American pianist and composer who released his debut album, Tongues of Fire, in March 2023 on Somm Recordings. He wrote the songs to accompany poems from modern poets W.S. Merwin, Gregory Leadbetter, Grevel Lindop, Alice Oswald, and Robert Graves. The poems are sung by acclaimed English tenor James Gilchrist and McElroy performs on piano.McElroy graduated from Washington State University and then continued his postgraduate education in Vienna and Oxford University. In this episode, Washington State Magazine editor Larry Clark talks with McElroy about the new album, his creative process, poetry, walking, and his influences at WSU and beyond. The music samples from Tongues of Fire featured in the episode:The Nomad Flute - W.S. Merwin After the Voices - W.S. MerwinStatuary I - Gregory LeadbetterMirror and Candle - Grevel LindopFalling - Alice OswaldA Dead Boche - Robert GravesRead more about McElroy in the Fall 2023 issue of Washington State Magazine.Tongues of Fire on Somm RecordingsEric McElroy’s websiteSupport the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
31:30 9/15/23
More than a kick
Dean Janikowski is the kicker for Washington State University’s football team, a 2022 graduate and currently an MBA student at WSU. He also has a great time on Instagram and other social media with photos and videos playing football for the Cougs, riding dirt bikes, and kicking spicy Chicken McNuggets.In this episode, Dean talks with Washington State Magazine writer Becky Kramer about raising money for the Heather Janikowski Foundation, a charity named for his mom, who died of cancer.Dean also talks about how he started his sports career in soccer, NIL (name, image, and likeness), and his side gig as a social media influencer.You can follow Dean Janikowski on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and TikTok.Read moreThe Fall 2023 issue of the magazine digs deeper into the rapidly changing landscape of NIL in college sports. Check it out next week at magazine.wsu.edu.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
12:58 7/27/23
Kellie Zimmerman, Brightloom, and adventures in tech
Kellie Zimmerman is no stranger to the Seattle tech scene. And she’s on a new adventure in the industry. She spent over 15 years building and leading teams in companies such as Concur and Avalara.Zimmerman is now CEO of Bellevue-based startup Brightloom, which leverages AI and data to help restaurants such as El Pollo Loco, Ruby Tuesday, and Jamba Juice accelerate their marketing and customer engagement.She talks about the twists and turns of the tech industry and her career after graduating in 2001 from Washington State University's Carson College of Business, with an emphasis in Management Information Systems. Zimmerman returned to the world of startups when she joined Brightloom in 2020. Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
17:11 7/14/23
James Donaldson’s gift of life
James Donaldson had a great college and professional basketball career, a physical therapy business, and many aspirations, even in retirement from sports. But over the course of several years, illness, bankruptcy, divorce, and circumstances in life sent Donaldson into a dark mental spiral. He found his way back, writing a book about his struggles and starting a foundation to help others. In this episode, Donaldson talks with magazine associate editor Adriana Janovich about his struggles with depression and suicidal thoughts, his recovery and memoir, and his desire to help other men, especially men of color, who face the same darkness. Donaldson, a 1979 alum of Washington State University, also talks about his WSU and NBA basketball career, influential coaches George Raveling and Lenny Wilkens, and how the suicide of WSU football player Tyler Hilinski shook him to the core so much that he sought help.  Find out more “Standing Tall” (Profile of Donaldson in the Spring 2022 issue of Washington State Magazine) Celebrating Your Gift of Life: From the Verge of Suicide to a Life of Purpose and Joy (Donaldson’s 2021 book) Your Gift of Life (A nonprofit foundation for mental health awareness started by Donaldson) Video and more stories about Donaldson at Washington State Magazine Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
22:45 5/30/23
No obstacles for this global nomad
Tom Haig loves adventure. From his high-flying diving days of youth to his recovery from a bicycling accident that left him paralyzed, Haig keeps on moving.He chronicles his life, struggles, and triumphs in a new memoir from WSU Press, Global Nomad: My Travels through Diving, Tragedy, and Rebirth. Haig writes with wit and candor about the ups and downs of adventure, culminating in his new career as a documentary filmmaker.In this episode, Haig, a WSU alum, talks with Washington State Magazine editor Larry Clark about reinventing his life, writing his book, and where he’s going next.Read a review of Global Nomad (Washington State Magazine, Summer 2023)“Wheeling new heights” (Profile of Haig in Washington State Magazine, Spring 2018)Buy the book at WSU PressThis New Book Recounts a Local Man’s Life Before and After Paralysis (Milwaukee magazine, January 20, 2023)Athlete Turned Advocate (WTMJ-TV, Milwaukee)Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
33:55 4/28/23
Ethics and AI art
ChatGPT, DALL-E, Midjourney, Stable Diffusion—names that most of us hadn’t heard more than a couple of years ago now represent a slew of creative programs powered by artificial intelligence. Large language model AI programs can write stories and articles, make illustrations and artwork, and converse with users using prompts. But what does it mean for human artists and writers? Will AI steal jobs and creative works? How should people approach the thorny ethical thicket around AI-generated art?Mark Fagiano, a philosopher and instructor at Washington State University, talks with Larry Clark, editor of WSU’s magazine, about how ethics in action and pragmatism can help people examine not only AI art, but any rapidly evolving technology and issues in society.Read about research into measuring AI’s capabilities in “When will artificial intelligence really pass the test?” (Washington State Magazine, Spring 2023) Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
27:54 3/30/23
Helen Szablya’s American adventure
Helen Mary Szablya and her family fled their home country of Hungary and its Communist regime in a harrowing journey under the cover of night in 1956. They traveled to Austria, Canada, and then to Pullman, Washington, where Helen received a degree, her husband John was an engineering professor, and they raised their family.Helen tells the full story in the second volume of her memoir, From Refugee to Consul. Adriana Janovich, associate editor of Washington State Magazine, talked with her about the amazing journey and her experiences along the way.Read a review of From Refugee to Consul in the Spring 2023 issue of Washington State Magazine.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
41:20 2/21/23
Empire of Ice and Stone
The treacherous Arctic is the setting of a harrowing true story of shipwreck, disaster, and survival in the early twentieth century. Acclaimed adventure writer Buddy Levy, also a creative writing and English professor at Washington State University, talks with Washington State Magazine associate editor Adriana Janovich about his latest book, Empire of Ice and Stone: The Disastrous and Heroic Voyage of the Karluk.The second of three nonfiction historical narratives by master storyteller Levy about survival and exploration in the Arctic wilderness, this book tracks the voyage of the Karluk to the Bering Sea and its destruction in the ice, leaving crew, Inuit guides, and passengers to struggle for their lives. In this episode, Levy talks about this captivating story of endurance, his inspiration for Arctic tales, research process—and a teaser for his third Arctic adventure book in progress, which takes to the skies.Watch for a full review of Levy’s book, Empire of Ice and Stone, in the Spring 2023 issue of Washington State Magazine, out in early February. You can read reviews of some of Levy’s other eight books at magazine.wsu.edu.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
44:19 12/6/22
Art experiences and happiness: a visit to the museum
Can experiencing art improve your wellbeing? What better way to answer that question than to visit an art museum at Washington State University.Ryan Hardesty, executive director of the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU, takes Washington State Magazine editor Larry Clark on a tour of the museum in WSU Pullman’s Crimson Cube. They have plenty to discuss about how people benefit from seeing, hearing, and experiencing art as they visit the exhibits—including Trimpin’s sound sculpture, Keiko Hara’s works of landscapes and dreams, Juventino Aranda’s powerful explorations of identity and home, and Irwin Nash’s photographs of Latino lives in migrant worker communities of the Yakima Valley.See the exhibits and find out how to visit the museum at museum.wsu.edu.Read more about art and happiness in “The joy of handiwork” in the Fall 2022 issue of the magazine.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
29:49 11/11/22
A boatload of ideas for fungi
There are a million things to do with fungi, from boats to book covers to medicine for bees. Katy Ayers, a Washington State University student and avowed mycophile has done some pretty amazing things with mushrooms and fungi, including a world record canoe and homes for bees.In this episode, we talk with the bioengineering and biochemistry major about her many ideas, the fungal revolution, and that famous MyConoe.Read more about fungi saving the bees, helping plants, and modeling a way to make biofuel stock in “It’s fungi to the rescue,” Winter 2022 issue of Washington State Magazine.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
22:06 11/4/22
Larkin Campbell: A view from the middle
Larkin Campbell calls himself an unknown actor. Now the Washington State University alum takes us behind the scenes of a life in Hollywood, not as a celebrity but as someone who loves the industry even if only a few recognize him.In this episode, Larkin talks about his WSU memories, getting into the acting business, and playing Coach Shane in the 125th episode of The Office, as husband of the girlfriend of main character Michael Scott.Read about Larkin’s hilarious memoir, A View from the Middle: How an Unknown Actor Managed to Stay That Way, in the Summer 2022 issue of Washington State Magazine.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
12:58 10/19/22
Blanca Blanco breaks the mold
Actress, model, and author Blanca Blanco grew up around Chelan in north-central Washington state. Her parents from Mexico—her dad was a farmworker and her mom took care of peoples’ kids—had very little money, but Blanco had big dreams for her future.In her recent memoir, Blanco tells her story of tenacity and determination, how she went from a tough youth to graduating from Washington State University with a psychology degree, and finally to a career in Hollywood.In this episode, she talks with Washington State Magazine associate editor Adriana Janovich about her childhood in Chelan, time at WSU Pullman, acting career, and writing her memoir during the pandemic lockdown.Read more about Blanco and her book in the Summer 2022 issue of Washington State Magazine.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
17:06 7/11/22
Enrique Cerna’s podcast pulls no punches
Enrique Cerna and Matt Chan, two veterans of television work, had many conversations as people of color in the industry and in the United States. They decided to start a podcast, Chino Y Chicano, to talk about the tough complexities of race, and invite guests to join those discussions.Cerna, an alum and Regent of Washington State University, discusses the start of the podcast, the guests they’ve talked to and topics they covered, and other topics from personal history to advice for aspiring journalists of color.Read about Cerna’s life, work, and the podcast in “Talk the walk,” Fall 2021 issue of Washington State Magazine.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
26:05 3/1/22
Medical leadership and 3D-printed cartilage
The Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine at Washington State University emphasizes leadership as part of its curriculum for medical doctors. Founding Dean John Tomkowiak talks about why leadership training is so crucial as health care evolves into medical teams. Physicians who are prepared to be leaders could provide better care for people and take a stronger role in their communities.Also in this episode:  WSU bioengineering researcher Arda Gozen studies another exciting advancement in medical and health sciences: 3D printing of cartilage. Additive manufacturing—3D printing—holds great potential for personalized medicine, treatment of osteoarthritis, and joint replacement.Read more about the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine’s first graduating class of doctors and about 3D printing of tissues in medicine.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
21:12 1/14/22
Bruce Barritt and the Cosmic Crisp® apple
Cosmic Crisp® just might be the perfect apple. Crisp, firm, juicy, sweet, slow to brown, and all around pleasing in appearance, it’s good for eating fresh as well as for cooking, in both sweet and savory dishes.Since its commercial release at the end of 2019, the inherently festive, crimson-colored apple, flecked with tiny golden lenticels and dubbed “The Apple of Big Dreams,” has received positive attention around the world. But it was bred at Washington State University specifically for Washington’s climate and growers. Bruce Barritt oversaw the WSU Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center in Wenatchee and developed the now-famous apple, a cross between Honeycrisp and Enterprise apples.In this episode, he talks about how Cosmic Crisp came to be, its attributes, and its potential.Learn more about Cosmic Crisp. Find Cosmic Crisp recipes. Read about the WA 2 apple (Sunrise Magic). Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
22:40 9/21/21
YAZZ Band: New Normal
Listen to a review and tracks from YAZZ Band: New Normal, a new jazz album recorded during the pandemic lockdown by Regents Professor of music Greg Yasinitsky at Washington State University. Along with guest musicians, Yasinitsky made the "little big band" sound from tracks recorded all over the world and then produced at the WSU recording studio.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
04:39 7/30/21
The future of hydrogen fuel and a Seattle DJ
Hydrogen fuel is emerging as a major part of the future fuel mix. Washington State University mechanical engineer Jacob Leachman has been on leading edge of hydrogen research for over a decade. He talks about hydrogen projects in the Pacific Northwest, reasons why hydrogen is a fuel of choice, and the potential of the fuel. Also in this episode:Seattle DJ Taryn Daly, a self-professed rockaholic and a WSU alumna, has her dream job at Seattle’s KISW station. Like most people, Taryn had to make some big adjustments during the COVID-19 pandemic.Read more about Leachman’s and other WSU researchers’ work on hydrogen, and about Taryn Daly’s career as a rock DJ.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
30:53 7/9/21
Hydrogen fuel start-up, a Coug love story, and healthy plant relationships
How do you take innovative research from the university lab to the public? Three Washington State University engineering researchers working on unique hydrogen fuel tanks, fueling stations, and other technology started their own company to move their findings into the commercial world. We spoke with two of the founders about the challenges of launching a business and the potential of green hydrogen fuel.Also in this episode:-          Two Cougs meet at a stoplight… A love story about a pair of Washington State University alumni in Austin, Texas, whose serendipitous connections led to marriage.-          Plants and microbes can and do have healthy symbiotic relationships. Stephanie Porter, a microbiologist at WSU Vancouver, talks about her research into the important symbiosis of crops and other plants with organisms in the soil.Read more about Porter’s symbiosis research, WSU alumni love stories, and hydrogen fuel research at Washington State University.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
27:22 2/26/21
Bats and viruses
Bats could be a key to help prevent a future pandemic.Washington State University researchers Stephanie Seifert and Michael Letko explain why the flying mammals are important for improving our understanding of viruses and diseases that spill over from animals to humans, such as Ebola, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and SARS-CoV-2 novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Seifert and Letko also take on misconceptions about the pandemic and talk about the challenges of studying bats.Both scientists work in the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, where Seifert is a research assistant professor studying molecular ecology.  Letko is an assistant professor and molecular virologist focused on cross-species transmission and viral-host interactions. The Allen School leads global research of zoonotic disease transmission between animals and humans. The school is also part of the One Health effort to further the understanding that human health is directly related to the health of animals and the surrounding environment.WSU News science writer Sara Zaske is the guest host.Read more about Letko’s coronavirus research in “Viral haystack,” Washington State Magazine, Fall 2020.[Thank you to Felix Blume for the recording of bats in Southern France.]Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
25:06 1/27/21
Roast goose, researcher parents, and a plague journal
“There never was such a goose. ... Its tenderness and flavour, size and cheapness, were the themes of universal admiration,” wrote Charles Dickens in A Christmas Carol. On this episode, Washington State University executive chef Jamie Callison offers ways to roast and serve the classic holiday goose and sides. It’s a dish ready for a comeback.Also in this episode:WSU Vancouver biologist Stephanie Porter on balancing life as a scientist and a parent. Research, teaching, and family is possible, as Porter explains through her own experiences.John Streamas from WSU was intrigued this year by Daniel Defoe’s plague journal written in 1722. Streamas penned his own scholarly observations in a modern plague journal for 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the world along with protests and examinations of racism. Read more about roasting goose, biologist Stephanie Porter’s research on symbiosis, and John Streamas’s plague journal of 2020.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
17:32 12/22/20
Glenn Johnson: Voice of the Cougs for 40+ years
We’re all missing the Apple Cup tradition this year, but we can still listen to the Voice of the Cougs.Glenn Johnson, mayor of Pullman and WSU football and basketball announcer, talked with associate editor Adriana Janovich via Zoom about his 40 plus years as Voice of the Cougars, and the surreal experience of announcing a 2020 football game at Martin Stadium without a crowd of fans.Read more about Johnson’s career in “The Voice.” (Fall 2020 Washington State Magazine)Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
28:32 11/27/20
Rowing for 50 years, listening to art, and encouraging women in STEM
Cougar Crew, a scrappy and resilient group of rowers at Washington State University, recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. They had to cancel a banquet and other events due to COVID-19, but former coach Ken Struckmeyer and rower Doug “Doc” Engle reminisce about the team, catching a crab, and rowing on the Snake River near Pullman. Also in this episode:Seattle-based artist, composer and inventor Trimpin created Ambiente432, an innovative sound installation at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at WSU. Visitors to the museum activate the artwork by walking around the entry pavilion and talking, which creates sounds that have calming effects.  WSU engineering professor Noel Schulz talks about her experiences as a woman in engineering. She shares ways to encourage girls and women to enter and stay in the science and engineering fields. Read more about Cougar Crew, Ambiente432, and women in STEM.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
18:58 11/16/20
Hunting the western toad, recognizing courage, and delving into the novel Stripland
Erim Gómez lives his childhood dream: catching frogs, toads, and salamanders. The doctoral student in environmental studies hunts for the western toad along the Snake River, as he works to determine the biodiversity of amphibians on the Palouse prairie. Also in this episode:Carla Peperzak risked her life and freedom in World War II as a member of the Dutch Resistance. She was only 16 when she secretly saved a number of Jews by making fake IDs. Now a 96-year-old Spokane resident, Carla was honored as Washington state Person of the Year for 2020.Joan Burbick, a retired English professor at Washington State University, talks about Stripland, her novel that explores trauma, perceptions of reality, violence, and connected relationships in the aftermath of a shooting of a Nez Perce man by a white police officer. Her powerful and moving book references the steep stretch of road in Lewiston, Idaho, that slices through the valley from the Snake River to the Nez Perce reservation.Read more about disappearing amphibians, Carla Peperzak's life, and the novel Stripland.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
16:50 9/1/20
Composing music, living with wasps, and relishing Rainier cherries
Composer and Washington State University music professor Greg Yasinitsky hears a band in his head when he's creating music. In the premiere episode of Washington State Magazine's podcast, Yasinitsky dives into the art and craft of composition...and why writing music for kids requires special attention. Also in this episode: Megan Asche, a WSU entomology doctoral student, wants us to better understand--and be less fearful of--those frequent barbecue visitors, wasps and yellowjackets. Rainier cherries, developed at Washington State in 1952, offer a delectable summer treat. WSU Executive Chef Jamie Callison serves up some ways to enjoy them in your meals.Read more about WSU's music studio, wasp research, and Rainier cherries.Support the show______________________________________________________________________________Want more great WSU stories? Follow Washington State Magazine: LinkedIn @Washington-State-Magazine X/Twitter @wsmagazine Facebook @WashingtonStateMagazine Instagram @WashingtonStateMagazine YouTube @WashingtonStateMagazine Email newsletter How do you like the magazine podcast? What WSU stories do you want to hear? Let us know. Give to the magazine
15:48 7/13/20