Show cover of Psych Matters

Psych Matters

Psych Matters is an informative and educational podcast by The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Psych Matters provides regular interesting topics for psychiatrists, psychiatry trainees and others with an interest in psychiatry.Disclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics. The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement. By accessing the RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website - RANZCP Website Terms of Use AgreementExpert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website - Your Health In Mind

Tracks

Mood Disorders Update with The Anna Freud Centre
In this episode, facilitated by Professor Bruce Singh AM, The Anna Freud Centre in the UK outline the work they are undertaking on behalf of the College to conduct an independent external review of the evidence for long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for the treatment of mood disorders. The key components of the review are discussed, including systematic reviews of both quantitative and qualitative literature, and plans to conduct one-to-one interviews with health professionals and people with lived experience of psychotherapy. We also hear more about the Anna Freud Centre team working on the review. Further information about the review is available here: Mood disorders | RANZCPProfessor Bruce Singh AM is Chair of the RANZCP Mood Disorders Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Evidence Review Steering Group. He is an Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry and previously Head of Department of Psychiatry at the University of Melbourne. He received his medical and psychiatry training at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney after graduating from the University of Sydney. Professor Peter Fonagy is the leader of UCL’s Psychology division and the Chief Executive of the Anna Freud Centre, a prominent charity dedicated to evidence based psychological intervention and treatment research. He is also a Consultant to the Child and Family Programme at the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine, and holds visiting professorships at Yale and Harvard Medical Schools. Additionally, he has held a number of key national leadership positions as an expert clinical advisor.Dr. Chloe Campbell is a Deputy Director at the Psychoanalysis Unit at the department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology at UCL. Chloe is an author on several meta-analyses and systematic review papers, such as a 2020 systematic review and meta-analysis which investigated long-term outcomes of psychological interventions on children and young people’s mental health. Dr Campbell is experienced in conducting and supervising qualitative research, including with participants with lived experience, and in developing ethics protocols.Max Moser is a clinical research fellow at the Anna Freud Centre and a part-time doctoral student at the Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology department at UCL. As a researcher, his expertise lies in meta-analytic, systematic, and scoping review design methodologies. He has worked on the production of meta-analyses exploring treatment effects in psychotherapy and a systematic review looking at mechanisms of change in psychotherapy.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website. 
23:08 4/11/24
Introduction to the new team of Australasian Psychiatry
This episode gives you a brief overview of the vision and goals for the Australasian Psychiatry journal in discussion with its new editorial team, hosted by Jeffrey Looi, Samantha Loi, Sharon Reutens and Tarun Bastiampillai.  They discuss the importance of promoting academia and scholarly projects, encouraging debate, and exploring policy and international perspectives. They also highlight the significance of psychiatry in the context of social sciences and the need for civilized discourse in the journal, empowered by a fair review process. They encourage listeners to contribute papers to the journal, and to especially use the expanded range of article types.A/Prof Jeffrey Looi, MBBS Syd, MD ANU, DMedSc Melb, FRANZCP, AFRACMA, is a clinical academic neuropsychiatrist, in private and public practice, and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at the Australian National University Medical School. Jeffrey leads the Australian, United States, Scandinavian-Spanish Imaging Exchange (AUSSIE) and the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has received multiple research and leadership awards including: a Fulbright Scholarship and Australian-Davos-Connection Future Summit Leadership Award. He is a co-author on more than 310 peer-reviewed papers, involving UCLA, Karolinska Institute and University of Melbourne. He is Editor-in-Chief of Australasian Psychiatry  A/Prof Samantha Loi is an old age psychiatrist and neuropsychiatrist working at the Royal Melbourne Hospital Neuropsychiatry Centre and Department of Psychiatry at the University of Melbourne.  She works clinically with people with young-onset neurocognitive disorders including Huntington’s disease and has 100 peer reviewed publications and grant funding in the area of young-onset dementia, ageing and mental health of older adults. Sam is immediate Past Chairs of the Young-Onset Dementia Special Interest Group and the Victorian Faculty of Psychiatry of Old Age. She is a Deputy Editor of Australasian Psychiatry.  Dr Sharon Reutens, MBBS, FRANZCP is a psychiatrist in private practice and a Scientia PhD scholar at UNSW. She is trained in neuropsychiatry and old age psychiatry, focussing on forensic psychiatry in older people. She is a Deputy Editor of Australasian Psychiatry.Prof Tarun Bastiampillai, MBBS Adl, BMedSc, FRANZCP, is a consultant psychiatrist with academic affiliations at Flinders University and Monash University. He has served in several leadership roles including South Australian Executive Director of Mental Health strategy (2015-2017). He received the RANZCP Margaret Tobin Award in 2020 for his contributions to administrative psychiatry. He has published over 300 peer reviewed manuscripts. He is a Deputy Editor of Australasian Psychiatry.  Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
30:22 4/4/24
"Sheroes" in Psychiatry - Dr Jacqueline Rakov
"Sheroes in Psychiatry" is an initiative of the Women in Psychiatry (WIP group). Sairee Chahal coined SHEROES in 1999 to denote "woman entrepreneur." WIP group selected the term "Sheroes" as a fitting term for every FRANZCP woman psychiatrist. By doing this podcast series, WIP aims to support and celebrate the work of Women psychiatrists. Their mission is to share the unique stories of this extraordinary group of women with the audience. The podcast plans to focus on who they are, where they come from, and where they are heading.Dr. Jacqueline Rakov is a clinical and forensic psychiatrist and Deputy Chair of the Forensic Faculty RANZCP (Vic). A large portion of her work includes the preparation of psychiatric reports in matters concerning both criminal and civil law. A particular area of interest is medicolegal work and reviewing the standard of care in medical negligence claims. She has worked with both plaintiff and defendant law firms in such matters as well as serving as the independent expert to the Coroner's Court. A passionate educator, Jackie holds a Masters of Health Professions Education and enjoys teaching medical students and doctors as well as offering continuing professional development to the legal community. In a treatment capacity Jackie has worked extensively in forensic settings, treating mentally ill offenders, and now holds a current appointment as the forensic psychiatrist for Monash Health and has particular interests in psychotherapy and trauma disorders in private practice. Dr Tina Rizkallah, is a consultant psychiatrist working in Victoria in the fields of forensic psychiatry and eating disorders. She is the past chair of women in psychiatry passionate advocate for gender equity both in and outside the workplace and training. Notable achievements include establishing the inaugural women in psychiatry dinner, conducting research on gender bias in psychiatry and lobbying the RANZCP for review of part time training fees. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website. 
30:50 3/28/24
"Sheroes" in Psychiatry - Prof Kay Wilhelm
"Sheroes in Psychiatry" is an initiative of the Women in Psychiatry (WIP group). Sairee Chahal coined SHEROES in 1999 to denote "woman entrepreneur." WIP group selected the term "Sheroes" as a fitting term for every FRANZCP woman psychiatrist. By doing this podcast series, WIP aims to support and celebrate the work of Women psychiatrists. Their mission is to share the unique stories of this extraordinary group of women with the audience. The podcast plans to focus on who they are, where they come from, and where they are heading.Professor Kay Wilhelm is Professor of Psychiatry at University of Notre Dame Sydney, Conjoint Professor in Psychiatry and Mental Health UNSW and Consultant in Liaison Psychiatry at St Vincent’s Hospital. She was a Member of NSW Medical Council for 14 years and Chair of Doctor’s Health Program for 12 and is now part of the Hearing Member Panel for the NSW Medical Council.  She is Chair, HETI Higher Education Governing Council and member of the Central and Eastern Sydney LDH Advisory Group of Suicide Prevention and Mental Health.  She has previously been a member of the RANZCP Examinations Board and a consultant and researcher in the Mood Disorders Unit at Prince Henry Hospital, which developed into the Black Dog Institute. Over this time, she carried out a seminal 30-year longitudinal study looking at gender differences of wellbeing (The Sydney Teachers’ Study). She has been awarded Founders’ Medal, from Australasian Society of Psychiatric Research; the RANZCP College Citation and NSW Branch’s Meritorious Service Award and is a Member of the Order of Australia. These awards were in recognition of services in depression management, suicide prevention, doctors’ health, professional education and service to the profession. Dr Padmini Howpage, a consultant psychiatrist based in Sydney, is an author, mentor, community leader, philanthropist and chair of the Mind Connections Foundation, a registered charity. She has fervently worked to dismantle the stigma surrounding mental illness, now steering the Mind Connections Foundation, an ACNC-registered charity providing vital programs to the vulnerable. As the founding chair of Women's Shed - Hills Shire and a former founding chair of the Positive Vibes Foundation, Dr Howpage's influence extends beyond psychiatry. Collaborating with her husband, Daya, she initiated an annual scholar award for medical students promoting mental health awareness. Dr Howpage's literary contributions include "Mindful Coco" for children and "7 Magic Minutes for Today" for adults, reflecting her commitment to diverse audiences. Her philanthropy hasn't gone unnoticed, earning her the 'Woman of the West 2019' award from Western Sydney University and nominations as a Citizen of the Year finalist by the Hills Shire Council in 2020 and 2022. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website. 
37:21 3/21/24
"Sheroes" in Psychiatry - Prof Colleen Loo
"Sheroes in Psychiatry" is an initiative of the Women in Psychiatry (WIP group). Sairee Chahal coined SHEROES in 1999 to denote "woman entrepreneur." WIP group selected the term "Sheroes" as a fitting term for every FRANZCP woman psychiatrist. By doing this podcast series, WIP aims to support and celebrate the work of Women psychiatrists. Their mission is to share the unique stories of this extraordinary group of women with the audience. The podcast plans to focus on who they are, where they come from, and where they are heading.Professor Colleen Loo, is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of New South Wales and the Black Dog Institute. She is an internationally recognised clinical expert and researcher in the field of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) and ketamine. She led the first Australian RCTs of these interventions in depression. She has published over 300 peer-reviewed papers and invited plenary and symposium speakers at national and international conferences. Expert adviser on policy and practice to Australian government health departments and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP). Established professional training courses for psychiatrists and mental health clinicians in ECT, TMS, tDCS and ketamine.Dr Padmini Howpage, a consultant psychiatrist based in Sydney, is an author, mentor, community leader and philanthropist. She has fervently worked to dismantle the stigma surrounding mental illness and is the chair of the Mind Connections Foundation, a registered charity. She has fervently worked to dismantle the stigma surrounding mental illness, now steering the Mind Connections Foundation, an ACNC-registered charity providing vital programs to the vulnerable. As the founding chair of Women's Shed - Hills Shire and a former founding chair of the Positive Vibes Foundation, Dr Howpage's influence extends beyond psychiatry. Collaborating with her husband, Daya, she initiated an annual scholar award for medical students promoting mental health awareness. Dr Howpage's literary contributions include "Mindful Coco" for children and "7 Magic Minutes for Today" for adults, reflecting her commitment to diverse audiences. Her philanthropy hasn't gone unnoticed, earning her the 'Woman of the West 2019' award from Western Sydney University and nominations as a Citizen of the Year finalist by the Hills Shire Council in 2020 and 2022. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website. 
41:19 3/14/24
"Sheroes" in Psychiatry - A/Prof Carolyn Quadrio
"Sheroes in Psychiatry" is an initiative of the Women in Psychiatry (WIP group). Sairee Chahal coined SHEROES in 1999 to denote "woman entrepreneur." WIP group selected the term "Sheroes" as a fitting term for every FRANZCP woman psychiatrist. By doing this podcast series, WIP aims to support and celebrate the work of Women psychiatrists. Their mission is to share the unique stories of this extraordinary group of women with the audience. The podcast plans to focus on who they are, where they come from, and where they are heading.A/Prof Carolyn Quadrio is well known for her work in women’s mental health and for introducing a feminist and gender analysis to mainstream psychiatry in Australia with her research on women in psychiatry - as patients and as practitioners and as victims of therapist abuse. In the forensic field, she is well known for her work on the abuse of children in religious institutions, the long-term sequelae of childhood sexual abuse, and psychiatric issues in domestic violence, including situations of domestic homicide.   Dr Padmini Howpage, a consultant psychiatrist based in Sydney, is an author, mentor, community leader and philanthropist. She has fervently worked to dismantle the stigma surrounding mental illness and is the chair of the Mind Connections Foundation, a registered charity. She has fervently worked to dismantle the stigma surrounding mental illness, now steering the Mind Connections Foundation, an ACNC-registered charity providing vital programs to the vulnerable. As the founding chair of Women's Shed - Hills Shire and a former founding chair of the Positive Vibes Foundation, Dr Howpage's influence extends beyond psychiatry. Collaborating with her husband, Daya, she initiated an annual scholar award for medical students promoting mental health awareness. Her career, spanning both public and private sectors, showcases her versatility in senior clinical, administrative, and academic positions. Dr Howpage's literary contributions include "Mindful Coco" for children and "7 Magic Minutes for Today" for adults, reflecting her commitment to diverse audiences. Her philanthropy hasn't gone unnoticed, earning her the 'Woman of the West 2019' award from Western Sydney University and nominations as a Citizen of the Year finalist by the Hills Shire Council in 2020 and 2022. Dr Howpage leaves an indelible mark in every facet of her journey, a compassionate force reshaping mental health advocacy. Her accolades and initiatives underscore a career dedicated to transforming lives and eradicating the barriers that surround mental illness and well-being.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website. 
44:01 3/7/24
"Sheroes" in Psychiatry - A/Prof Melanie Turner
"Sheroes in Psychiatry" is an initiative of the Women in Psychiatry (WIP group). Sairee Chahal coined SHEROES in 1999 to denote "woman entrepreneur." WIP group selected the term "Sheroes" as a fitting term for every FRANZCP woman psychiatrist. By doing this podcast series, WIP aims to support and celebrate the work of Women psychiatrists. Their mission is to share the unique stories of this extraordinary group of women with the audience. The podcast plans to focus on who they are, where they come from, and where they are heading.A/Prof Melanie Turner is an Associate Professor at the University of Adelaide and works as a child and adolescent psychiatrist in private practice in South Australia.  Mel is also an elected board director on the RANZCP Board, is the presiding member of the voluntary assisted dying review board in South Australia as well as a Member of the Medical Board of South Australia and a director on the board of Mental Health Australia. Dr Padmini Howpage, a consultant psychiatrist based in Sydney, is an author, mentor, community leader and philanthropist. She has fervently worked to dismantle the stigma surrounding mental illness and is the chair of the Mind Connections Foundation, a registered charity. She has fervently worked to dismantle the stigma surrounding mental illness, now steering the Mind Connections Foundation, an ACNC-registered charity providing vital programs to the vulnerable. As the founding chair of Women's Shed - Hills Shire and a former founding chair of the Positive Vibes Foundation, Dr Howpage's influence extends beyond psychiatry. Collaborating with her husband, Daya, she initiated an annual scholar award for medical students promoting mental health awareness. Her career, spanning both public and private sectors, showcases her versatility in senior clinical, administrative, and academic positions. Dr Howpage's literary contributions include "Mindful Coco" for children and "7 Magic Minutes for Today" for adults, reflecting her commitment to diverse audiences. Her philanthropy hasn't gone unnoticed, earning her the 'Woman of the West 2019' award from Western Sydney University and nominations as a Citizen of the Year finalist by the Hills Shire Council in 2020 and 2022. Dr Howpage leaves an indelible mark in every facet of her journey, a compassionate force reshaping mental health advocacy. Her accolades and initiatives underscore a career dedicated to transforming lives and eradicating the barriers that surround mental illness and well-being. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website. 
33:35 2/29/24
An Insight into Leadership and Management in Psychiatry
This is a 2 part episode of podcasts  with leading Australian and New Zealand psychiatrists developed by the RANZCP Section of Leadership and Management. The following discussions hosted by Associate Professor Robert Parker (Chair of SLAM)  aims to encourage and inform Early Career and other psychiatrists in pursuit of a career in Leadership and Management.  Dr. Peggy Brown AO is currently one of three Commissioners appointed to the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide. She formerly held roles including Senior Clinical Advisor at the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care; Chief Executive Officer of the National Mental Health Commission; Director-General, ACT Health; Chief Psychiatrist/Director of Mental Health in Queensland, the Australian Capital Territory, and the Northern Territory; and an NHS International Fellow in the United Kingdom. She has also served on several Boards (including the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA), Health Workforce Australia, the National eHealth Transition Authority, Healthscope (Advisory Board). In January 2018, she was admitted as an Officer in the General Division of the Order of Australia for distinguished service to medical administration in the area of mental health through leadership roles at the state and national level, to the discipline of psychiatry, to education and to health care standards. Prof Brett Emerson AM is a psychiatrist and currently a medical member of the Qld Mental Health Review Tribunal, Chair, Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (Queensland Branch) and a Member of the Qld Mental Health Commission Council. He is a Board Director and medical assessor of the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS). He is the former Executive Director of Metro North Mental Health, covering the mental health services at RBWH,TPCH, Caboolture and Redcliffe Hospital catchments in North Brisbane. He was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in 2017 for significant service to psychiatry and medical administration.Professor Brett Emmerson - UQ Researchers Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
34:20 2/15/24
Voluntary Assisted Dying and Complex Grief
Life throws up a lot of options, challenges and choices and death comes to us all.  Voluntary assisted dying is an end of life option for  a small number of people in Australia but has brought about a lot of conversation and debate.  In this podcast Associate Professor Melanie Turner who is a psychiatrist and also the presiding in member of the Voluntary assisted dying Review Board of South Australia speaks to Dr Ava Carter about assisted dying.  VAD started on January 31 2023 in South Australia and it has been an interesting journey to see the evolution of VAD in that time. The podcast covers what voluntary assisted dying is; how it is offered and the aspects of grief, loss and death when a death is planned. Prof Melanie Turner is an Associate Professor at the University of Adelaide and works as a child and adolescent psychiatrist in private practice in South Australia.  Mel is also an elected board director on the RANZCP Board, is the presiding member of the voluntary assisted dying review board in South Australia as well as a Member of the Medical Board of South Australia and a director on the board of Mental Health Australia. Dr Ava Carter is dual qualified in Dentistry and Medicine and is the Senior Psychiatric Registrar in the ACT. She has been a vocal advocate for accreditation and governance since her time at Griffith University as an academic supervisor and lecturer as a dentist and currently works with the Canberra Regional Accreditation Committee and was appointed to the Council in 2021. She is keenly engaged in JMO teaching and academic supervision of ANU medical students, and an enthusiastic promoter of clinical psychiatry, research, and clinical teaching, both within mental health services and across the general hospital. Her interests include consultation liaison psychiatry, the interface of dentistry and psychiatry, and medical education. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
47:49 2/1/24
Women in Rural Psychiatry
In this episode, a group of women psychiatrists working across rural and remote Australia and New Zealand talk about their experiences.  The main points covered were: what attracted them to the work, the benefits and what have they gained from their experience, how their careers have developed, their family’s experience, the motivations to continue working rurally or moving back to urban settings, and finally their advice for other women interested in rural psychiatry.Dr Selamawit Mulholland is a psychiatrist with a passion for remote and transcultural psychiatry.  She has lived and worked in regional, rural and remote settings across Australia.  Sela feels privileged to have worked with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people while learning about their experiences of wellbeing and culture, and is excited to continue her career in remote psychiatry. Dr Katharine McAlpine is a fellow completing advanced training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in regional Victoria. She has trained and worked in regional and rural communities from internship onwards and has been an advocate for improving training opportunities in these settings. She is passionate about addressing inequalities within regional training and access to mental health services within regional and rural Australia. Her interests include legal frameworks around mental health and disability rights and improving the assessment and research of neurodevelopmental disorders. Dr Emma Crampin is Deputy Chief Psychiatrist of Western Australia. Having trained in London and Melbourne, she moved with her young family to rural WA in 2012, and worked for WA’s Country Health Service for 10 years. She has set up and worked in a wide range of services, from home treatment and early intervention teams in inner city London, to emergency telehealth across the vast expanse of rural and remote WA. She is interested in access, equity, social justice, innovation and good governance.Dr Nicola Lauterwein is a regional psychiatrist who has been living and working in the Kimberley for most part of the last 10 years. She is passionate about her work, especially working alongside Aboriginal colleagues and communities and she is grateful for the opportunity to share two-way knowledge. She maintains close connections to the Kimberley and is a strong advocate for training opportunities in rural and remote settings.Dr Sue Mackersey is a graduate of the University of Otago Medical School and completed Fellowship training in Australia in 1994. Dr Mackersey’s work experience has been in Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia, public and private practice, metropolitan and rural settings and across a range of sub specialities. In the last 12 years she has been based in Tauranga and has been Clinical Director and Director of Area Mental Health Services for the Bay of Plenty and Hauora Tairawhiti. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
43:56 1/18/24
Old Age Psychiatry
This Podcast recorded live at the Perth RANZCP Congress discusses research in Old Age Psychiatry presented in a free paper session. A/Prof Gary Cheung (Dementia prevalence and treatment in Maori and non-Maori), Dr Alok Rana and Dr Sandeep Reelh (Assessing dementia underdiagnosis: screening, diagnosis, and management of cognitive impairment/dementia at the Mackay Base Hospital) discuss their respective research projects, findings, clinical and policy implications with the host, A/Prof Jeffrey Looi.A/ Prof Gary Cheung (PhD FRANZCP MBChB BSc) is an academic old age psychiatrist at The University of Auckland, New Zealand. He is the current Chair of RANZCP’s Subcommittee of Advanced Training in Psychiatry of Old Age.  He was awarded the 2021 Alzheimers New Zealand Fellowship to recognise his contribution to psychosocial dementia research. He is an interRAI fellow and the Chair of New Zealand interRAI Research Network. Dr Alok Rana MBBS, FRCPsych, FRANZCP, MBA is a Consultant Psychiatrist (Consultation Liaison) and Psychogeriatrician based in Mackay Queensland. He has special interest in Clinical Research, Neuropsychiatry and Neurostimulation. He finished his training in General Psychiatry with Membership of Royal College of Psychiatrists (MRCPsych) before completing the specialist training in Old Age Psychiatry in UK. Dr Rana moved to Australia in 2016 to set up specialists services in Mackay including Consultation Liaison and Old Age Psychiatry services. He holds a Fellowship of the RANZCP with Advanced Certificate in Old Age Psychiatry and Consultation Liaison Psychiatry. He was awarded Fellowship of Royal College of Psychiatrists, UK (FRCPsych) in 2019.A/Prof Jeffrey Looi, MBBS Syd, MD ANU, DMedSc Melb, FRANZCP, AFRACMA, is a clinical academic neuropsychiatrist, in private and public practice, and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at the Australian National University Medical School. Jeffrey leads the Australian, United States, Scandinavian-Spanish Imaging Exchange (AUSSIE) and the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has received multiple research and leadership awards including: a Fulbright Scholarship and Australian-Davos-Connection Future Summit Leadership Award.  Dr Sandeep Reelh, MD, MRCPsych (UK), Advance Trainee in Consultation Liaison Psychiatry (Australia), currently working in Addiction medicine and Older Person’s Mental Health at Mental Health Alcohol and Other Drugs Services, Mackay Hospital and Health Services, Queensland Health. He is also an Adjunct Senior Lecturer in the College of Medicine and Dentistry at James Cook University. He has been a former Psychiatry Teaching Fellow of the Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust and was awarded the best Undergraduate Formal Teacher of the year at Newcastle University (UK).Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
35:07 1/4/24
End of Year Message 2023
As 2023 draws to a close, the Psych Matters team: David and Nishta, would like to thank you for your support during the year.We hope that you’ve enjoyed the many topics presented during 2023, and we look forward to bringing many more to you in 2024.We would especially like to thank College members and others who have generously given their time to develop and present Psych Matters.We’ll be back on the 5th of January with the next episode of Psych Matters.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
00:52 12/21/23
Mindfulness and Wellbeing for Staff in Healthcare
In this episode of Psych Matters, doctors Maura Kenny and Linda Kader engage in conversation about the need for staff wellbeing to be a priority for healthcare settings. They also touch upon a number of issues in the healthcare industry which are crucial to explore systematically and understand ways to address to create a sustainable transformative work culture, whereby excellent care provision is there for patients, and at the same time a thriving team of staff delivering such care.Dr Maura Kenny is a consultant psychiatrist in SA Health with a longstanding specialist interest in mindfulness and self-compassion in both clinical settings and in the wellbeing of healthcare staff. In 2013 she developed a mindful self-care course, which has now been taken up around the world in a range of healthcare settings. In October 2022, Maura was appointed as the inaugural Director of Staff Wellbeing in the largest Local Health Network in SA, comprising 16,000 employees. This role is responsible for coordinating the content, promotion, implementation and evaluation of the CALHN Wellbeing Pathway, and developing a strategic plan that ensures a staff wellbeing perspective on all CALHN activities and initiatives.Dr Linda Kader is a consultant psychiatrist, psychotherapist & mindfulness teacher with a strong interest and commitment to raise and facilitate necessary conversations in healthcare leadership and management. She works at The Royal Melbourne and The Royal Children's Hospitals offering leadership & clinical care, supervision & teaching of registrars, and supporting various aspects of service development  & implementation. She is a Mentor for registrars with RANZCP, holds passion for refugee healthcare and engages in Human Rights Advocacy through her local Council committees. She brings to her daily work extensive practice and knowledge of mindfulness and compassion to nurture professional, safe and engaging working atmosphere for  her teams and all staff. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
42:32 12/7/23
An Update on Treatments for OCD
This podcast covers the content of a workshop held at the RANZCP Perth Congress 2023. There is a discussion about the nosological status of OCD; a review of controversies and advances in psychological and pharmacological treatments;  a discussion of neuromodulation (including TMS and DBS); and finally the potential role of psychedelic assisted therapy for OCD. Prof David Castle is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at The University of Tasmania; and Co-Director, Tasmanian Centre for Mental Health Service Innovation. He has wide clinical and research interests, encompassing schizophrenia and related disorders, bipolar disorder, OCD spectrum disorders and disorders of body image. He has a longstanding interest in the impact of licit and illicit substances on the brain and body, and is actively engaged in programmes addressing the physical health of the mentally ill and the mental health of the physically ill. He has published widely in the scientific literature and is a frequent speaker at scientific meetings.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
31:02 11/23/23
Reflections on a decade as the editor of Australasian Psychiatry – Interview with Professor Vlasios Brakoulias
Professor Vlasios Brakoulias is stepping down after a decade as the Editor of Australasian Psychiatry, during which the journal’s impact factor has doubled, the editorial board has greatly and inclusively expanded, and there have been a host of broad-ranging and high-quality papers on the science and art of psychiatry. In this podcast, Professor Brakoulias is interviewed by Associate Professor Jeffrey Looi about his reflections and experiences as Editor of the journal.Professor Vlasios Brakoulias, MBBS Syd, PhD Syd, FRANZCP is a psychiatrist who specialises in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, he is the Editor in Chief of Australasian Psychiatry, the Executive Director of the Western Sydney Local Health District and the Head of the Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders Service which aims to deliver early intervention for these disorders. He is a Conjoint Professor with the School of Medicine of Western Sydney University, a Clinical Associate Professor with The University of Sydney and a member of the Translational Health Research Institute (THRI). He is known internationally as an expert in obsessive-compulsive and related disorders having presented at numerous international conferences and being a co-author on more than 100 peer-reviewed papers.Associate Professor Jeffrey Looi is a clinical academic neuropsychiatrist, in private and public practice, and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at the Australian National University Medical School. Jeffrey leads the Australian, United States, Scandinavian-Spanish Imaging Exchange (AUSSIE) and the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has received multiple research and leadership awards including: a Fulbright Scholarship and Australian-Davos-Connection Future Summit Leadership Award. He is an co-author on more than 255 peer-reviewed papers, involving UCLA, Karolinska Institute and University of Melbourne.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
24:11 11/9/23
Younger Onset Dementias
Young onset dementias, including frontal lobe dementias, are dementias that occur in people less than 65 years old.  This episode discusses the challenges in diagnosing dementia in younger people, investigations including neuroimaging and cognitive testing and potential red-flags that might lead the general psychiatrist to consider a dementia diagnosis when reviewing middle-aged adults with psychiatric symptoms and conditions.A/Prof Samantha Loi is an old age psychiatrist and clinical researcher with expertise in the area of dementia.  She has worked in the area of young-onset dementia at Neuropsychiatry, Royal Melbourne Hospital since 2011 and has a track record of publications and invitations to speak on this topic, as well as being the current Chair of the Young-Onset Dementia Special Interest Group, current Vic Chair of the RANZCP Faculty of Psychiatry of Old Age and YOD representative for the Australian Dementia Network (ADNet).A/Prof Steve Macfarlane became a psychiatrist in 2003, and was appointed Director of Aged Psychiatry at Peninsula Health in 2005. He moved to Alfred Health in 2008 as Associate Professor and Director of Aged Psychiatry, before becoming Head of Clinical Services for Dementia Support Australia in 2016.Steve is a past Chair of the Faculty of Psychiatry of Old Age for the RANZCP, has been running Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials for over 20 years, and has clinical interests in frontal lobe disorders and in senile squalor. Resources:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.5694/mja2.51849https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36705011/Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
45:47 10/26/23
Lived Experience of Intellectual Disability and Domestic Violence: Episode 2
This series of two podcasts explores the effective communication strategies Psychiatrists could use with their patients, and the impacts of domestic violence on patients with intellectual disability. Episode 2 focuses more on Lachlan's experience with domestic violence and the added complexity in treatment, family, and communication.Dr Dan Mirmilstein is a loving dad and husband, avid meditator, superhero fan and Lego enthusiast. He works as a psychiatry consultant in a major metropolitan health service helping people improve their mental health. He hopes to bring empathy, knowledge, skill and authenticity to his work as a child and adolescent psychiatrist, and offer integrated, whole-hearted treatment to young people and their families.Lachlan Sayer is a second-year education student at RMIT. He has a leadership role at UoM in designing the curriculum for a new course that aims to teach medical students the social science and interaction strategies for patients with special cognitive or verbal difficulties.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
46:06 10/12/23
Lived Experience of Intellectual Disability and Domestic Violence: Episode 1
This series of two podcasts explores the effective communication strategies Psychiatrists could use with their patients, and the impacts of domestic violence on patients with intellectual disability. Episode 1 is an introduction to Lachlan Sayer and his experiences living with intellectual disability and interactions with Psychiatrists.Dr Dan Mirmilstein is a loving dad and husband, avid meditator, superhero fan and Lego enthusiast. He works as a psychiatry consultant in a major metropolitan health service helping people improve their mental health. He hopes to bring empathy, knowledge, skill and authenticity to his work as a child and adolescent psychiatrist, and offer integrated, whole-hearted treatment to young people and their families.Lachlan Sayer is a second-year education student at RMIT. He has a leadership role at UoM in designing the curriculum for a new course that aims to teach medical students the social science and interaction strategies for patients with special cognitive or verbal difficulties. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
50:22 9/28/23
Psychiatrist and trainee burnout
In this episode senior trainees Dr Ava Carter, Dr Matthew Brazel and A/Prof Jeffrey Looi discuss trainee and psychiatrist burnout. The episode covers the definition, research on burnout in Trainee and Psychiatrists, as well as the broader literature, medical student and career experiences, and evidence-based management. The podcast is based on a paper co-authored, with Professors Stephen Allison, Tarun Bastiampillai, Steve Kisely, Jeffrey Looi and Drs Paul Maguire and Matthew Brazel.Dr Ava Carter is dual qualified in Dentistry and Medicine and is the Senior Psychiatric Registrar in the ACT. She has been a vocal advocate for accreditation and governance since her time at Griffith University as an academic supervisor and lecturer as a dentist and currently works with the Canberra Regional Accreditation Committee and was appointed to the Council in 2021. She is keenly engaged in JMO teaching and academic supervision of ANU medical students, and an enthusiastic promoter of clinical psychiatry, research and clinical teaching, both within mental health services and across the general hospital. Her interests include consultation liaison psychiatry, the interface of dentistry and psychiatry, and medical education.Dr Matthew Brazel is an advanced trainee in Psychiatry of Old Age at the Canberra Hospital and the Academic Fellow at the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine within the Australian National University Medical School. He is a passionate advocate for psychiatry training for medical students and junior medical officers. His research interests include the neurobiology of depression, old age psychiatry and health resourcing. In his spare time, he enjoys watching movies, reading and running after his two young children.Associate Professor Jeffrey Looi is a clinical academic neuropsychiatrist, in private and public practice, and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at the Australian National University Medical School. Jeffrey leads the Australian, United States, Scandinavian-Spanish Imaging Exchange (AUSSIE) and the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has received multiple research and leadership awards including: a Fulbright Scholarship and Australian-Davos-Connection Future Summit Leadership Award. He is an co-author on more than 255 peer-reviewed papers, involving UCLA, Karolinska Institute and University of Melbourne.Further Resources:Australasian Psychiatry (trainees and psychiatrists can login through the RANZCP website to access): https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/10398562221124798MJA : https://doi.org/10.5694/mja2.51714Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
52:33 9/14/23
Paediatric Intellectual Disability in Academia and Policy
Intellectual Disability (ID) in children is characterised by significant difficulties in both intellectual functioning (e.​g. understanding and communicating, memory and executive functioning, learning, problem solving) and adaptive behaviour (e.g. activities of daily living and everyday routines and social skills). To help those with ID reach their full potential, early identification and intervention are critical. Since they are more likely to have additional disabilities and/or co-morbid conditions such as other neurodevelopmental (e.g. autism, ADHD, tics) and mental health (e.g. anxiety, depression, behavioural issues) disorders, comprehensive assessment and appropriate intervention of these co-existing conditions is important.   This episode of Psych Matters covers the importance of early identification and how a public health approach to reaching “all” children is an important first step coupled with the need for clinicians involved in the care of ID to consider assessing and managing comorbid psychiatric diagnoses as diagnostic overshadowing is common in individuals with ID.  Further Resources available hereProf Valsamma Eapen MBBS., PhD., FRCPsych., FRANZCP  is Professor and Chair of Infant, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, UNSW Sydney & Head, Academic Unit of Child Psychiatry South West Sydney (AUCS). Eapen is also Director of BestSTART Child Health Academic unit; Chair, Faculty of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, RANZCP; and Treasurer and President Elect of International Neuropsychiatry Association.  Clinically trained in India and the UK, Eapen completed advanced training in Child Psychiatry at the Great Ormond Street Hospital Rotational Scheme and Institute of Child Health, and PhD from University of London with research on Tourette Syndrome undertaken at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery. Known internationally for expertise in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and Tourette Syndrome, Eapen’s work has a focus on health equity. Eapen has published over 350 articles, 6 books and >50 book chapters and is currently part of research programs totalling >40M in funding. Professor Richard Harvey has been a consultant psychiatrist since 1998. He trained in the UK and migrated to Australia in 2003. He has held a variety of clinical positions in public and private in Australia. He is a Clinical Professor at Deakin University and is currently in private practice. He is the Chair of the RANZCP Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy Steering Group and he is also the Chair of the RANZCP Committee for Continuing Professional Development. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
41:04 8/31/23
Lived Experience of Psychiatrists
Doctors Israel Berger, Vidya Narayan, and Kieran Allen discuss their lived experience of mental illness and how mental illness affects doctors. They address the issues of suicidality amongst healthcare workers, particularly psychiatrists and SIMGs, how to seek help, regulatory concerns, managing confidentiality, and inpatient admissions. They speak about their own experiences of mental illness and seeking support in addition to general issues.Dr Israel Berger is a final year Child & Adolescent Psychiatry trainee at Goulburn Valley Health. He holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Roehampton, which examined silence in the psychotherapy context. He is passionate about research and clinical practice, particularly trauma, therapeutic relationships, transgender health, and early intervention in psychosis Dr Kieran Allen is a stage 2 trainee at Monash Health. He has a keen interest in the mental health of health professionals and was a founding member of Hand-n-Hand Peer Support. Kieran has battled with his own mental illness and spoken about it publicly from time to time as a way to challenge the stigma faced by many doctors faced with their own mental illness.Dr Vidya Narayan graduated to FRANZCP in 2023. She works part-time as a consultant psychiatrist with Goulburn Valley Health, Shepparton. She is originally a Specialist International medical graduate (SIMG), with her two post-graduate qualifications in psychiatry from India. Further, she has training and work experience with three different services spread across metropolitan and regional Victoria, since migrating to Australia in 2014. Vidya is passionate about psychiatry and is particularly interested in the area of prevention, more specifically addressing special populations (women, children and older adults) Resourceshttps://www.mja.com.au/journal/2016/205/6/suicide-health-professionals-retrospective-mortality-study-australia-2001-2012 Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
47:04 8/17/23
Maori Experiences of Intellectual Disability
Mā te huruhuru ka rere te manu. Adorn the bird with feather and they will fly. Dr Hinemoa Elder. Te Aupōuri, Te Rarawa, Ngāti Kurī, Ngāpuhi.In this episode of Psych Matters, Dr Hinemoa Elder begins with a broad background related to Māori concepts of disability including those of 'Tangata Whaikaha' and 'Whānau Hauā’. The discussion includes Māori levels of need, and mātauranga Māori, Māori knowledge systems about Hinengaro or Female deity of Mind.  Specific examples of approaches which are in use are then provided including Te Waka Kuaka and Te Waka Oranga. References to some of the key papers in the area are also discussed.Resources: Reframing disability from an Indigenous perspectiveGuidelines for Cultural Assessment – Maori (health.govt.nz) Pacific Mental Health in Aotearoa New Zealand | RANZCPRecognising the significance of TeTiriti o Waitangi | RANZCPCultural safety | RANZCPIntellectual disabilities (ID): Addressing the mental health needs of people with ID | RANZCP Partnering with people with a lived experience | RANZCPDr Hinemoa Elder is Māori, of Te Aupōuri, Ngāti Kurī, Te Rarawa and Ngāpuhi descent. Hinemoa is a mother of two adult children. She is a Fellow of the Royal Australia and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists and is a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist working in both District Health Boards and private practice in the fields of community and inpatient child and adolescent psychiatry, youth forensic and neuropsychiatry.  Dr Elder is an advocate for use of Te Reo Māori, the Māori language.A longer bio is available in her previous episode: https://www.buzzsprout.com/1072258/10462186Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
41:09 8/3/23
Doctors' Wellbeing
Hand-n-Hand (Helping Australian & New Zealand Nurses and Doctors) was founded in March 2020 in far north QLD. Initially a response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the growing emotional burden that came with it, we have been amazed with the speed and enthusiasm with which peer support has been adopted. Today, hundreds of participants and volunteer facilitators have signed up to be a part of the growing peer support movement, from just about every healthcare profession imaginable. What we quickly discovered is that there is an ongoing need for peer support beyond the pandemic, and are making efforts to turn Hand-n-Hand into a sustainable, long-term solution that can provide peer support for generations of healthcare workers to come.Prof Brett McDermott is an Australian medical graduate who trained in Psychiatry, and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the UK and Sydney. Apart from being a Professor at the University of Tasmania, he holds other academic appointments: By-Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge University; Adjunct Professor at JCU; Professorial Fellow at Mater Research and from 2006-2016 was a Board Director of beyondblue: the National Depression Initiative. Current position is the Clinical Director CAMHS Tasmania.Dr Tahnee Bridson was the Queensland Young Australian of the Year for 2022. Whilst she initially thought of pursuing a career in dance and music, she had a desire to improve the wellbeing and lives of others that led her down the path of medicine. Tahnee, a born and bred country girl from rural Queensland, is a psychiatry doctor and founder of Hand-n-Hand Peer Support Inc. Tahnee has advocated for the wellbeing needs of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic establishing a peer support network which provides free and confidential support to all healthcare workers across Australia and New Zealand. She is passionate about advancing the field of mental health through research and recently combined these two passions when offered a PhD position in Melbourne.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
37:28 7/20/23
Cognitive Impairment of Mood Disorders
Cognitive impairment is a core feature of mood disorders (depression and bipolar disorder) and is evident across a range of domains (memory, executive function, attention, processing speed). Research shows that cognitive impairment persists into recovery and relates to problems in occupational and psychosocial functioning. International task forces have thus identified cognition as an important treatment target in mood disorders, in attempting to improve overall recovery for people with mood disorders. This podcast covers the importance of clinicians considering cognitive functioning in individuals with mood disorders, as well as practical strategies for assessing and treating cognitive problems. Further References:‘Cognition in Bipolar Disorder’ - https://www.isbd.org/Files/Admin/Cognition-Booklet.pdfDouglas KM, Peckham A, Porter R, Hammar A. Cognitive enhancement therapy for mood disorders: A new paradigm? Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2019 Dec;53(12):1148-1150. doi: 10.1177/0004867419873711. Epub 2019 Sep 13. PMID: 31516027; PMCID: PMC7290243.Dr Katie Douglas is a Senior Research Fellow (Sir Charles Hercus Fellow) and Clinical Psychologist at the Department of Psychological Medicine (University of Otago, Christchurch, NZ). Her research work focuses on understanding the cognitive and hormonal underpinnings of mood and anxiety disorders, as well as clinical trials investigating psychotherapies and cognitive remediation for mood disorders. She co-chairs the Australasian Society of Bipolar and Depressive Disorders and is Associate Editor of BJPsych Open. Prof Richard Porter is head of the Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch and a Consultant Psychiatrist in a service for adults with intellectual disability. He also works in an ECT service and sees many patients with treatment resistant mood disorder. He trained in psychiatry in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne where his clinical training focussed on the treatment of resistant mood disorders. Recently his research has focused on psychological treatments for mood disorders including treatments for neuropsychological impairment in depression and bipolar disorder. He has published over 200 scientific papers mainly in the area of cognition in mood disorders. He is an author of the recent Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Mood Disorder Guidelines. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
26:09 7/6/23
Perspectives on psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy in clinical practice
In this episode, Professor Richard Harvey is in conversation with Professor David Castle (University of Tasmania) and Associate Professor Lynette Averill (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston and Yale School of Medicine) to discuss their perspectives on psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy in clinical practice.Professor Richard Harvey has been a consultant psychiatrist since 1998. He trained in the UK and migrated to Australia in 2003. He has held a variety of clinical positions in public and private in Australia. He is a Clinical Professor at Deakin University and is currently in private practice. He is the Chair of the RANZCP Psychedelic-Assisted Therapy Steering Group and he is also the Chair of the RANZCP Committee for Continuing Professional Development. Professor David Castle is a part of the Department of Psychiatry, The University of Tasmania; and Co-Director, Tasmanian Centre for Mental Health Service Innovation. He has wide clinical and research interests, encompassing schizophrenia and related disorders, bipolar disorder, OCD spectrum disorders and disorders of body image. He has a longstanding interest in the impact of licit and illicit substances on the brain and body, and is actively engaged in programmes addressing the physical health of the mentally ill and the mental health of the physically ill. He has published widely in the scientific literature and is a frequent speaker at scientific meetings. Associate Professor Lynnette A. Averill is a clinical research psychologist at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and National Centre for PTSD and a professor of psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine and Yale University Department of Psychiatry. Associate Professor Averill studies the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of psychedelic medicine in PTSD, including glutamate-modulating ketamine and serotonergic psilocybin and MDMA, and their role in mechanistically intervening synaptic connectivity, which subsequentially manifests in behavioural, mood, and cognitive changes. Centred in a humanistic perspective, her studies have found that psychedelic medicines are particularly effective in addressing suicidality, guilt, shame, blame, and forgiveness.ResourcesFor guidance regarding psychedelic-assisted therapy see Psychedelics | RANZCPFeedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
33:33 6/22/23
Regional and Rural Academic Psychiatry
It is well known that rural/regional Australians face greater health and mental health burdens at the same time as lower levels of service access. Dispersed populations and lower levels of research infrastructure are barriers to rural/regionally based academic psychiatrists. Nevertheless, opportunities exist for those willing to follow the dictum "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are." Dr Andrew Amos, leads a discussion of the realized and potential opportunities for successful  research in rural/regional Australia, with a focus on building rural/regional research capacity. A/Prof Mathew Coleman is a consultant psychiatrist with the WA Country Health Service, Clinical Director for the Great Southern and Midwest Mental Health Service and Clinical Academic with the Rural Clinical School of WA. He is a qualified child and adolescent, and addiction psychiatrist and has experience and qualifications in health service management. He was also the former Commissioner with the National Mental Health Commission. A/Prof Ajay Verma Macharouthu; MBBS, MD (Psych), MRCPsych, FRANZCP; currently works as a Staff Specialist in Consultation Liaison Psychiatry for Older Persons, ECT Director & Rural Director of Training for Psychiatry  in Cairns & Hinterland Hospital & Health Services. He is an adjunct Associate Professor at James Cook University, Cairns. He is the recipient of the RANZCP award for the faculty of POA prize for best mental health service improvement 2022. He was the Chair of the Scottish Delirium Association and Co-chaired the SIGN (Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network) 157 Delirium Guideline. He was a research lead and Principal Investigator for several dementia drug trials. Dr. Ernest Hunter is a retired child and adult psychiatrist and public health physician who worked for over three decades in remote Indigenous northern Australia. Ernest integrated research and his clinical practice with a particular focus on population level impacts and interventions, through which the importance of understanding the historical and social contexts that inform patterns of mental distress and disorder in those populations became clear. He is the author of two recent books - Vicarious Dreaming (2019) and Reef Madness (2022) which teeter on the edge of psychiatry.Dr Andrew Amos, a Townsville-based psychiatrist, is Chair of the Queensland Section of Rural Psychiatry and Deputy Editor of Australasian Psychiatry. He is currently completing a Ph.D using Machine Learning to map the psychiatric knowledge contained within the Medline database. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website. 
36:02 6/8/23
Loneliness and Mental Health
While all people may experience the detrimental impacts of loneliness, there are unique health and social impacts of loneliness and social isolation for people with mental health conditions and their families/whānau/carers. They are at higher risk of experiencing loneliness and social isolation and its associated stigma can be a key factor in impeding recovery for people with mental illness. The RANZCP’s Community Collaboration Committee (CCC) with Lived Experience Australia has created this podcast in the aims of having high educational value and raising public awareness of the interrelationship between loneliness and mental health.Links: Understanding Loneliness and Mental HealthProf. Sharon Lawn is the Chair and Executive Director for Lived Experience Australia Ltd, a nationally awarded mental health consumer and carer advocacy organisation. A member of the College’s CCC, she also sits on the Board of Mental Health Australia and the Australian Self-Care Alliance. She continues mental health lived experience research as a Professor at Flinders University in SA and has lived experience as both a consumer and family carer.Cat Drew has a lived experience of mental health challenges dating back to early childhood. She graduated from Monash University and worked as a teacher, before sustaining a head injury (car Vs tree) that altered her career path. She worked as a Consumer Consultant in Victoria’s public mental health system prior to qualifying as a Registered Veterinary Nurse. Paul Milne is a lived experience Mental Health Advocate for Police and emergency services. Having spent many years as a policeman in the Northern Territory he has experienced PTSD. As a father of four children, he knows the importance of physical and mental exercise. Paul is currently enrolled in a Master of Counselling at the University of Canberra and is also a lead organiser for the Heart2Heart Walk.A/Prof Simon Stafrace is the Program Director of Mental & Addiction Health at Alfred Health in Melbourne, Clinical Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Monash University, and Co-Chair of the Community Collaboration Committee of the RANZCP.Simon was a board member of Tandem Carers from 2016-20 and Mental Health Victoria from 2018-20.  From 2020-22, he undertook a two-year secondment in the Victorian Department of Health as Chief Adviser. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
59:33 6/1/23
Psychosocial Rehabilitation
This episode of Psych Matters explores Psychosocial Rehabilitation within a recovery oriented service system. The esteemed panel includes A/Prof Stephen Parker, A/Prof Frances Dark, Dr Catherine Brasier, and Will McKinlay. Through their discussion they provide us the great opportunity to learn not only clinical perspectives but also from lived experience perspectives about rehabilitation and what role it plays. A/Prof Stephen Parker is the Director, Research at Metro North Mental Health in Brisbane. He works clinically within a public Early Psychosis service. He has previously worked extensively across a broad range of rehabilitation settings, and continues to conduct research with the goal of improving the experiences and outcomes of people accessing residential rehabilitation services (Stephen Parker (0000-0002-6022-3981) (orcid.org)). A/Prof Frances Dark is currently the Director of the Rehabilitation Academic Clinical Unit for Metro South Mental Health Services, and the Director of the state-wide Deafness and Mental Health Service. She has a strong interest in psychosocial rehabilitation for consumers with mental illness, and has pioneered innovative programs in Queensland such as social cognition and cognitive remediation groups. Dr Dark has a strong research history, including a publication in Nature genetics.  She has been actively involved in community organization’s including being an advisor to Headway, and on the boards of Open Minds and the Queensland branch of the Mental Illness Fellowship Australia. Dr Catherine Brasier's focus is on supporting better connections between people with Lived Experience, research and practice. She is the Lived Experience Strategic Lead of Wellways and Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in the School of Social Work and Social Policy at La Trobe University. She draws on her experience of mental distress and personal recovery, plus her experience as a mental health worker.  Will McKinlay is a peer support worker with 13 years working experience. Will's background is working originally in NGO’s and over the last 8 years, working at QLD Health; mostly in a psychosocial rehabilitation setting. He believes recovery from mental health issues is possible for anyone and role is to guide someone through their recovery from mental health issues and most importantly, show that there is always hope, even in adversity.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
43:20 5/25/23
A sceptic's look at the use of psychedelics
In this episode of Psych Matters, A/Prof Suresh Muthukumaraswamy and Dr Chiranth Bhagavan discuss Suresh's talk 'A sceptical look at the use of psychedelic drugs in medicine'. While there is significant interest in the use of psychedelics as medicines in psychiatry the evidence base has a number of limitations and these are delved into in this discussion.Interested listeners can read in more detail:https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/00048674221081763?journalCode=anpahttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17512433.2021.1933434A/Prof Suresh Muthukumaraswamy is an Associate Professor in The School of Pharmacy at The University of Auckland. His research Suresh’s main research interests are in understanding how therapies alter brain function and behaviour and in testing methodologies to measure these changes in both healthy individuals and patient groups – particularly in depressed patients. He has investigated over 20 different CNS drugs and began research into psychedelics in 2011.Dr Chiranth Bhagavan is a senior psychiatry registrar and consultation-liaison advanced trainee currently in a dual clinical and academic role in Auckland, New Zealand. Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australia or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
45:20 5/11/23
The History of Psychiatry Part 3: A History of Anti-Psychiatry in the 20th Century
This episode is the final episode in a 3-part series on the History of Psychiatry. In this particular episode Dr. Kaplan speaks about the notable names in the movement of Anti-Psychiatry during the 20th Century.Dr Robert M. Kaplan, MBChB FRANZCP MA MPhil, is a Forensic psychiatrist, lecturer and speaker with positions at the University of New South Wales, Western Sydney University and Wollongong University. His fields of expertise are sleep and pain disorders, neuropsychiatry and psychological aspects of physical disorders. He also holds the distinguished position at RANZCP, of Chair of the Binational Section Philosophy and the Humanities in Psychiatry.Feedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer:This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
29:30 5/4/23

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