Show cover of PsychologiCALL

PsychologiCALL

Are you a psychology student, struggling to concentrate on reading papers? A psychology lecturer, trying to mix up your teaching a bit? A teacher or parent who wants to know what's going on in child development research? or maybe a neurodivergent adult reflecting on their youth? If so, welcome to our podcast! We hope these bite-sized, guided tours of recent research papers - via an informal chat with the author - will interest and inform you. The podcast is currently hosted by Louisa (Lou) Thomas, a postdoctoral research assistant in the Centre for Autism at the University of Reading. Each episode is a conversation between Lou, and a fellow academic. Together we discuss one of their recent (or classic) papers relating to child and adolescent development and learning. We don’t have a recording booth or fancy equipment, but this wee bit of brain food should be a nice nutritious snack for a curious mind.

Tracks

The season 3 advice episode
For the final episode of season 3, Louisa brings you a brief overview of the episodes from this season.At the end of every episode, the guest gets asked if they have advice for students and early career researchers. In this season finale, you can find all of this advice in one handy place.---To keep up to date with PsychologiCALL, to find out when the next season is coming out, or if you'd like to be a guest yourself, you can follow Louisa on Twitter @ljthomas1991 and you can find her contact details on her website. 
23:19 04/11/2022
On social vulnerability and social interaction style in neurodevelopmental conditions, with Ellen Ridley
Ellen Ridley is PhD student in the Centre for Neurodiversity & Development at Durham University. The aim of her research is to better understand the factors that impact on social vulnerability in children and young people with Williams syndrome (WS).  During this podcast she chats to Louisa about a piece of work which takes a cross-syndrome approach to exploring social vulnerability and social interaction style in neurodevelopmental conditions, including WS.---You can follow Ellen on Twitter @ellenridley, and you can find out more about Ellen and her research on her webpage at Durham. You can also follow the lab group on Twitter at @DurhamDevDis.The ECR Developmental network that was mentioned in this podcast can also be found on Twitter @ECR_DevNetwork.---The paper discussed in this podcast is:Ridley, E., Riby, D. M. & Leekam, S. R. (2020). A cross-syndrome approach to the social phenotype of neurodevelopmental disorders: Focusing on social vulnerability and social interaction style. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 100, 103604Click here for an open access version.
21:43 04/04/2022
On helping employers to make tailored adjustments for their autistic employees, with Beatriz López
Beatriz López is a Reader in Developmental Psychology at the University of Portsmouth, who specialises in the double empathy problem in autism, heterogeneity in autism and employment. During this podcast she chats to Louisa about an evaluation of a set of employment profiling tools to enhance employment opportunities for autistic people.---You can follow the Centre for Interaction, Development and Diversity on Twitter @UoP_CIDD to find out more about ongoing related research. You can also check out the webpage for the Autism Centre for Research and Employment where you can find more about the ongoing projects and services offered.---The paper discussed in this podcast is:López, B., Kargas, N., Udell, J., Rubín, T., Burgess, L., Dew, D., McDonald, I., O’Brien, A. & Templeton-Mepstead, K. (2021). Evaluation of the ACE employment programme: Helping employers to make tailored adjustments for their autistic employees. Advances in Autism, 7(1), 3-15.
13:52 03/28/2022
On play-based inventions and mental health in autism and developmental language disorder, with Gill Francis
Dr Gill Althia Francis is a Research Fellow in Cognitive Psychology and Children's Play at the University of York, who specialises in researching how play impacts development for both neurodiverse and neurotypical children. She is a holder of a Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship Award. During this podcast Gill chats to Louisa about a piece of work looking at the impact of play-based interventions on the mental health of autistic children and children with developmental language disorder.---You can find Gill on Twitter @gillalthia, and you can find out more about her work by visiting her staff page at York.---Gill has also been featured in a children's book as a 'Play Researcher', and you can find the book here.---The paper discussed in this podcast is:Francis, G., Deniz, E., Torgerson, C., & Toseeb, U. (2022). Play-based interventions for mental health: A systematic review and meta-analysis focused on children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and developmental language disorder. Autism & Developmental Language Impairments.
20:29 03/21/2022
On visual motion processing in dyslexia, with Cathy Manning
Dr Cathy Manning is a lecturer at University of Reading who researches sensory processing and decision-making in typically developing, autistic and dyslexic children. During this podcast she chats to Louisa about a new study looking at how children with dyslexia perceive and make decisions about visual information.You can find Cathy on Twitter @CManningPhD, and you can find out more about the work we discuss in this episode in this summary article in The Conversation.---The paper discussed in this podcast is:Manning, C., Hassall, C. D., Hunt, L. T., Norcia, A. M., Wagenmakers, E-J., Snowling, M. J., Scerif, G., & Evans, N. J. (2022). Visual motion and decision-making in dyslexia: Reduced accumulation of sensory evidence and related neural dynamics. Journal of Neuroscience, 42 (1) 121-134.
11:32 03/14/2022
On contagion of temporal discounting preferences in autism, with Louisa and Jasmine Virhia
This week is a slightly different format, because we've flipped the script. During this podcast episode, Louisa is interviewed by Jasmine Virhia, a postdoctoral researcher in the inclusion initiative at LSE. They talk about a paper that came out of Louisa's PhD, which explored contagion in autistic and non-autistic participants.You can find more about Jasmine and her work by checking out her website, and you can find her on Twitter @JVirhia.You can also find out more about Louisa's research on her website, and you can find her on Twitter @ljthomas1991. ---The paper discussed in this podcast is:Thomas, L., Lockwood, P. L., Garvert, M. M., & Balsters, J. H. (2022). Contagion of temporal discounting value preferences in neurotypical and autistic adults. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 52(2), 700–713.
19:49 03/07/2022
On curiosity-driven learning in dyslexia, with Saloni Krishnan
Saloni is a developmental cognitive neuroscientist trying to understand how to help children with communication disorders. During this podcast, she chats with Louisa about her recent work on intrinsic motivation, and its links to learning. This episode also includes a discussion about work life balance in academia.You can find more about Saloni and her work by checking out her N-CoDe Lab at Royal Holloway, and you can find her on Twitter @salonikrishnan.---The paper discussed in this podcast is:  Garvin, B., & Krishnan, S. (2022). Curiosity-driven learning in adults with and without dyslexia. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 75(1), 156–168. 
30:23 02/28/2022
On facial expression recognition in autism, with Connor Keating
Connor Keating is an experimental psychologist at the University of Birmingham who specialises in emotion perception and production in autism. During this podcast, he chats to Louisa about a piece of work investigating facial expression recognition in autistic and non-autistic individuals. Connor and Louisa also chat about some pilot data exploring differences in facial expression generation between autistic and non-autistic individuals.If you want to hear more about the idea that a mismatch in facial expressions may result in bidirectional emotion recognition difficulties for autistic and non-autistic individuals, you can find a paper here, or a summary article here.To stay up to date with Connor's research, you can find him on Twitter @ConnorTKeating and also his wonderful supervisor @Jennifer_L_Cook.---The paper discussed in this podcast is:Keating, C. T., Fraser, D. S., Sowden, S. & Cook, J. L. (2021). Differences between autistic and non-autistic adults in the recognition of anger from facial motion remain after controlling for alexithymia. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
19:14 02/21/2022
On exploration during adolescence, with Alex Lloyd
Alex Lloyd is a developmental psychologist at University College London who specialises in cognitive development and mental health. During this podcast, they chat to Louisa about a paper examining the positive sides of adolescents' novelty seeking tendencies and why exploration may be beneficial during this point in the lifespan.You can find Alex on Twitter @Alex_Lloyd93 and you can watch his TEDx talk about youth justice here.---The paper discussed in this podcast is:Lloyd, A., McKay, R., Sebastian, C. L., & Balsters, J. (2020). Are adolescents more optimal decision-makers in novel environments? Examining the benefits of heightened exploration in a patch foraging paradigm. Online preprint. 
18:37 02/14/2022
On the impact of sensory processing differences for autistic pupils, with Liz Jones
Liz Jones is a developmental psychologist at Durham University who specialises in sensory differences in autism. During this podcast they chat to Louisa about a piece of work looking at the the impact of sensory differences at school for autistic pupils.---The paper discussed in this podcast is:Jones, E. K., Hanley, M., & Riby, D. M. (2021). Distraction, distress and diversity: Exploring the impact of sensory processing differences on learning and school life for pupils with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 72, 101515.
13:11 02/07/2022
On linking brain and behaviour using network analyses with Joe Bathelt
Dr Joe Bathelt is a developmental cognitive neuroscientist who investigates how brain and behavioural differences interact as young people grow up. During this podcast, he chats to Louisa about a piece of working looking at the network approach to understanding brain and behaviour.You can find more about Joe and his research here, and you can find him on Twitter @JoeBathelt---The paper discussed in this podcast is:Bathelt, J., Geurts, H. M., & Borsboom, D. (2021). More than the sum of its parts: Merging network psychometrics and network neuroscience with application in autism. Network Neuroscience, 1-33.
16:25 01/31/2022
On adventurous play in school-aged children, with Rachel Nesbit
Dr Rachel Nesbit is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow based in the Children and Young People’s Mental Health Research Collaboration at the University of Exeter. She specialises in play and mental health in children and young people. During this podcast she chats to Louisa about her recent review looking at the factors that might help or hinder schools in providing children with opportunities for adventurous play*.*Adventurous play has been defined as exciting or thrilling play where children are able to take age-appropriate risks (e.g., climbing trees, jumping off rocks).--- Another paper of potential interest is The British Children's Play Survey - the largest study of play in Britain to date: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/8/4334---You can find out more about Rachel's research here.You can also find Rachel on Twitter @rachelnesbit.---The paper discussed in this podcast is:Nesbit, R. J., Bagnall, C. L., Harvey, K. & Dodd, H. F. (2021). Perceived barriers and facilitators of adventurous play in schools: A qualitative systematic review. Children, 8(8), 681. 
17:26 01/24/2022
On children’s perceptions of the risks and benefits of social media, with Beatrice Hayes
Beatrice is a social developmental psychologist at Royal Holloway, University of London who specialises in children and adolescents' use of online digital technologies as well as students' use of online learning tools. During this podcast, they chat to Louisa about their recently published paper looking at primary school children's perceptions of the risks and benefits of social media use and to what extent their parents and teachers may mediate these perceptions.You can find out more about Beatrice's research here.You can also find Beatrice on Twitter @drbeatricehayes and on LinkedIn---The paper discussed in this podcast isHayes, B., James, A., Barn, R., & Watling, D. (2021). "The world we live in now": A qualitative investigation into parents', teachers', and children's perceptions of social networking site use. The British journal of educational psychology. Advance online publication.
21:06 01/17/2022
On the sensory experiences of autistic adults, with Keren MacLennan
Dr Keren MacLennan is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Reading, who specialises in sensory reactivity, mental health, and autism. She has key interests in examining how the sensory world impacts autistic people, but also why autistic people are at greater risk of developing mental health conditions, such as anxiety. During this podcast, Keren chats to Louisa about a piece of recently published work, co-produced with autistic individuals, that looks at autistic adults' experiences of having sensory reactivity differences.You can find Keren on Twitter @KerenMacLennan and on Instagram @theanxiousscientistIf you'd like to find out more about the Sensory Street project we mentioned in today's episode, you can find out more here!--- The paper discussed in this podcast isMacLennan, K., O’Brien, S. & Tavassoli, T. (2021). In our own words: The complex sensory experiences of autistic adults. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.
18:37 01/10/2022
PsychologiCALL season three taster, and a new host!
PsychologiCALL is back for season three, with a new host!Louisa is an autistic academic working at the university of Reading. In this trailer episode, she talks to Sue about the podcast so far, the podcast handover, and her plans for season three.You can find out more about Louisa and her research here, and you can find her on Twitter @ljthomas1991---The blog post we mentioned in today's trailer episode contains advice on starting a PhD, and you can find it here.---Tune back in for the first episode of season three of PsychologiCALL on 10th January 2022!
21:40 12/22/2021
On early trauma and neurodevelopment, with Helen Minnis
Helen Minnis is a Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Glasgow.  Professor Minnis spent time working as an Orphanage Doctor in Guatemala in the early 1990s prior to training in Psychiatry, and this stimulated an interest in the effects of early maltreatment on children's development.  Her research focus has been on Attachment Disorder and she is now conducting intervention research for maltreated children including a randomised controlled trial of an infant mental health service for young children in foster care. You can find out more about Helen's work on her academic profile page or by following her on twitter. The paper discussed in this episode is: Dinkler, L., Lundström, S., Gajwani, R., Lichtenstein, P., Gillberg, C., & Minnis, H. (2017). Maltreatment‐associated neurodevelopmental disorders: a co‐twin control analysis. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 58(6), 691-701.Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
21:27 04/23/2021
On pattern learning in autism, with Sebastian Gaigg
Sebastian is a psychologist at City University's Autism Research Group, where his research focusses on two main topics; mental health in autism with a particular focus on anxiety, and understanding learning and memory processes across the autism spectrum. During this podcast he chats to Sue about a recent piece of work that sought to establish whether individual differences in aspects of implicit learning might play a role in the varying degrees of language impairments that are seen across the autism spectrum.You can find out more about Sebastian's work on his profile page and here you can find out more about the wider work of the Autism Research Group at CityThe paper discussed in this podcast is Gaigg, S.B., Krug, M.K., Solomon, M., Roestorf, A., Derwent, C., Anns, S., Bowler, D.M., Rivera, S., Wu Nordahl, C. & Jones, E.J.H. (2020). Eye-tracking reveals absent repetition learning across the autism spectrum: Evidence from a passive viewing task. Autism Research, 13, 1929-1946.Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
22:19 04/16/2021
On children's creative ideas, with Sarah Rose
Dr Sarah Rose is a developmental psychologist and Course Leader for the Psychology and Child Development Undergraduate degree course at Staffordshire University. She specialises in children's creative development, and external influences on this such as screen time. In this podcasts she chats to Sue about a piece of research looking at where children get their ideas of what to draw.You can find out more about Sarah's work by following her on twitter. The paper discussed in this episode is: Rose, S. E. & Jolley, R. P. (2020). Children’s creative intentions: where do the ideas for their drawings come from. Journal of Creative Behaviour, 54,  712-724 Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
25:17 04/09/2021
On theta waves and information processing, with Emily Jones
Emily is a developmental psychologist who works at the Birkbeck Babylab in London and specialises in understanding early neurodevelopmental pathways to conditions such as autism and ADHD. During this podcast she chats to Sue about a piece of work looking at how changes in early brain activity may predict later cognitive skills in neurodiverse cohorts.You can find out more about Emily's work by checking out the BONDS project pages and the Birkbeck Babylab site, and you can follow her on twitter here.The paper discussed in this episode is:Jones, E. J. H., Goodwin, A., Orekhova, E., Charman, T., Dawson, G., Webb, S. J., & Johnson, M. H. (2020). Infant EEG theta modulation predicts childhood intelligence. Scientific reports, 10(1), 1-10.Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
20:57 04/02/2021
On primary to secondary school transition, with Charlotte Bagnall
Dr Charlotte Bagnall is a developmental psychologist at The University of Exeter who specialises in school transition research. During this podcast she chats to Sue about a piece of work looking at Year 7 parents', children's and Year 6 and 7 teachers' retrospective experiences of primary-secondary school transition using focus group methodology and how these stakeholders feel this period can be improved. This research has made a unique contribution to the field of primary-secondary school transition, both in terms of the findings and the analytical method used, as Charlotte describes. You can find out more about Charlotte by following her on twitter here. The paper discussed during this podcast is: Bagnall, C. L., Skipper, Y., & Fox, C. L. (2019). ‘You're in this world now’: Students’, teachers’, and parents’ experiences of school transition and how they feel it can be improved. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 90(1), 206-226.More related papers from Charlotte and her colleagues are: Bagnall, C. L. (2020). Talking about School Transition (TaST): an emotional centred intervention to support children over primary-secondary school transition. Pastoral Care in Education, 38(2), 116-137.Bagnall, C. L., Fox, C. L., & Skipper, Y. (2021). When is the ‘optimal’ time for school transition? An insight into provision in the US. Pastoral Care in Education, 1-29.Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
18:53 03/26/2021
On early life experiences and long term outcomes, with Louise Marryat
Louise Marryat is a quantitative sociologist at the University of Dundee who specialises in using routinely collected data from health and education records, as well as birth cohort studies, to explore the pathways that children take throughout childhood and how services can support them to reach their full potential.You can find out more about Louise's work by following her on twitter here.The paper discussed in this episode is:Marryat, L, and  Frank, J. Factors associated with adverse childhood experiences in Scottish children: a prospective cohort study.  BMJ Paediatrics Open 3.1 (2019).Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
25:22 03/19/2021
On spatial cognition and STEM success, with Emily Farran
Emily Farran is a developmental psychologist at the University of Surrey. She directs the Cognition Genes and Developmental Variability (CoGDeV) Lab with co-director Katie Gilligan-Lee. Emily specialises in the typical and atypical development of spatial cognition. During this podcast she chats to Sue about the typical development of spatial cognition and its relationship to the development of STEM expertise.You can find out more about Emily's work by checking out her research profile here or following her on twitter here. Parents and teachers might also be interested in the practical tips covered in this blog post.  The paper discussed in this podcast is: Farran, E. K. Spatial ability as a gateway to STEM success. Impact: the Journal of the Chartered College of Teaching, 18, 19.Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
21:14 03/12/2021
On sensory integration and autism, with Kirsty Ainsworth
Dr. Kirsty Ainsworth is a psychologist and lecturer at University of Glasgow who specialises in autism and sensory perception. During this podcast she chats to Sue about a piece of research on multisensory integration in autism.You can find out more about Kirsty's work by checking out the site for her former lab in MicGill here, and you can follow her on twitter here.The paper discussed in this episode is:Ainsworth, K., Ostrolenk, A., Irion, C., & Bertone, A. (2020). Reduced multisensory facilitation exists at different periods of development in autism. Cortex, 134, 195-206.Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
18:18 03/05/2021
On sensory reactivity and anxiety in autism, with Teresa Tavassoli
Since 2017 Teresa Tavassoli has been working at the University of Reading, first as a Lecturer and since 2019 as an Associate Professor.  Her research is dedicated to deepening our understanding of sensory reactivity in autism and its variation across the population. Her work is using multidisciplinary approach to identify reliable ways to measure sensory reactivity as well as to elucidate underlying mechanisms, and examine links to mental health symptoms. You can find out more about Teresa's work by checking out the Centre for Autism's webpages and you can follow her on twitter here. The paper discussed in this episode is: MacLennan, K., Roach, L., & Tavassoli, T. (2020). The relationship between sensory reactivity differences and anxiety subtypes in autistic children. Autism Research, 13(5), 785-795.Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
21:31 02/26/2021
On language development and longitudinal research, with Courtenay Norbury
Professor Courtenay Norbury is a psychologist and speech-language therapist at UCL who specialises in language, cognition, and social interaction across a range of neurodevelopmental conditions. You can read more about Courtenay's work at her lab website here and follow her on twitter here. During this podcast she chats to Sue about SCALES, a 10-year longitudinal study that has been tracking the development of a large cohort of young children from school entry to Year 9.The following is one paper from the study discussed in the podcast: Norbury, C. F., Vamvakas, G., Gooch, D., Baird, G., Charman, T., Simonoff, E., & Pickles, A. (2017). Language growth in children with heterogeneous language disorders: a population study. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 58(10), 1092-1105.Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
25:50 02/19/2021
On Talking Walls and schools-based research, with Laura Crane
Laura Crane is an academic researcher at the Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE) whose work focuses on improving educational experiences and outcomes for autistic young people. During the podcast, she chats to Sue about her research with Norah Richards, a practitioner-researcher from Prior's Court School, on the development and initial evaluation of a 'Talking Wall' to meaningfully elicit the voices of autistic young people with complex needs.You can find out more about Laura's work at her online profile, and follow her on twitter here. The reference for the paper being discussed in this podcast is: Richards, N., & Crane, L. (2020). The development and feasibility of a multimodal ‘Talking Wall’ to facilitate the voice of young people with autism and complex needs: a case study in a specialist residential school. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 50, 4267-4279. doi: 10.1007/s10803-020-04476-6Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
26:18 02/12/2021
On language and phonological memory, with Sue Gathercole
Sue Gathercole is a cognitive psychologist with interests in memory, learning and language. Until 2018 she was the Director of the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit (CBU) in Cambridge and is now based in Developmental Psychiatry at the University of Cambridge. In this podcast Sue talks about a classic paper in which she examined how memory for words was affected in children with language disorders and whether this might provide an explanation for those language problems. She reflects on the paper's influence and how developmental psychology research has changed since it was published. You can find out more about Sue's work at her online profile. The full reference for the paper being discussed in this podcast is:Gathercole, S. E., & Baddeley, A. D. (1990). Phonological memory deficits in language disordered children: Is there a causal connection?. Journal of memory and language, 29(3), 336-360.Many thanks to Naomi Meiksin for editing the transcript for this episode. 
27:57 02/05/2021
On early years screening for autism, with Professor Tony Charman
Tony's main research interest is development in autism and the clinical application of this work via screening, diagnostic, epidemiological, intervention, and family studies. During this podcast he chats to Sue about a piece of work looking at outcomes from an autism early screening study that taught him a lot about the value of sample, cohorts and methods.You can find out more about Tony's work at his online profile. You can follow Tony on Twitter here.The paper being discussed in this podcast is: A screening instrument for autism at 18 months of age: a 6-year follow-up study. Baird G, Charman T, Baron-Cohen S, Cox A, Swettenham J, Wheelwright S, Drew A. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2000 Jun;39(6):694-702. doi: 10.1097/00004583-200006000-00007.
38:55 08/25/2020
On social compensation in autism, with Dr Lucy Livingston
Dr Lucy Livingston is a psychologist and Lecturer at Cardiff University in the Wales Autism Research Centre, who specialises in neurodevelopmental conditions such as autism spectrum disorder. During this podcast, she chats to Sue about a piece of work looking at compensatory mechanisms in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. You can find Lucy's lab group pages here and follow her on twitter here. The article discussed in the podcast is: Livingston, L. A., Colvert, E., Social Relationships Study Team, Bolton, P., & Happé, F. (2019). Good social skills despite poor theory of mind: exploring compensation in autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 60(1), 102-110.
26:37 08/13/2020
On boosting mind-mindedness, with Professor Liz Meins
Elizabeth Meins has been studying how parents interact with their infants for 30 years. Her research has shown how “tuning in” to your child (so-called mind-mindedness) has a positive impact on parenting and children’s development. During this podcast she chats to Sue about her recent work in developing a smartphone app that has proved effective in boosting parents' mind-mindedness.You can follow Elizabeth on twitter here. The paper discussed in this episode is: Larkin et al. (2019) Proof of concept of a smartphone app to support delivery of an intervention to facilitate mothers’ mind-mindedness. PLOS One, 14(8): e0220948
17:00 08/11/2020