Show cover of You Decide with Errol Louis

You Decide with Errol Louis

NY1’s Errol Louis has been interviewing powerful politicians and cultural icons for years, but it’s when the TV cameras are turned off that things really get interesting. From career highlights, to personal moments, to stories that have never been told, join Errol each week for intimate conversations with the people who are shaping the future of New York and beyond. Listen to "You Decide with Errol Louis" every Wednesday, wherever you listen to podcasts.

Tracks

‘Gridlock’ Sam Schwartz: 50 years in the making, congestion pricing is fast approaching
More than 50 years ago, an early form of congestion pricing almost came to New York City when Mayor John Lindsay attempted to charge drivers for crossing the East River bridges into Manhattan. While Lindsay’s push died in court, one of his chief planners, Sam Schwartz, has been stuck in city traffic ever since.  “Gridlock Sam” is a former New York City traffic commissioner who has studied driving behavior almost his entire adult life. With the June 30 launch of congestion pricing fast approaching, Schwartz joined NY1’s Errol Louis to talk about the complicated history of traffic in New York City. They also discussed the origins of the term gridlock, support for bike lanes, recent safety issues plaguing McGuinness Boulevard in Brooklyn and the future of apps like Waze.   Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
39:33 5/23/24
Live from N.Y.: The life, legacy and near-presidential candidacy of Mario Cuomo
Building on the success of NY1’s documentary about the career of Mario Cuomo, NY1 and Hunter College’s Roosevelt House held an in-depth discussion about the former governor that was moderated by Errol Louis. Errol’s panelists were Mary Ann Crotty, Cuomo’s former director of state operations; Harold Holzer, a former top aide to Cuomo who now serves as Roosevelt House’s director; and renowned journalist Denis Hamill.  The special live taping of the panel on May 14 was held at Roosevelt House — Hunter College’s Public Policy Institute and the former Manhattan home of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
39:25 5/16/24
Dan Barry: The genius of Jimmy Breslin
Few people have had more of an impact on modern journalism than Jimmy Breslin. Breslin was a Pulitzer Prize Award-winning New York journalist and author who rose to fame in the 1960s, with columns that attracted millions of readers. Breslin displayed an unrivaled mastery at deadline journalism, whether he was covering John Lennon’s murder, the assassination of Malcolm X or the man who dug John F. Kennedy’s grave. His influential style has resonated long after his six-decade career came to an end and continues to this day. One person who was influenced by Breslin’s writing is New York Times columnist Dan Barry. Barry is the editor of a brand new anthology of Breslin’s best work, titled “Jimmy Breslin: Essential Works.” Barry joined NY1’s Errol Louis to discuss their shared love of Breslin’s columns, as well as how he changed journalism. They also discussed the way he wrote about the people who rarely made the headlines. Finally, they touched on the current state of the New York Times, where he continues to work. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
25:15 5/9/24
Norman Siegel: A lifetime of protecting the First Amendment
Norman Siegel has been a civil right and civil liberties lawyer in New York City for over 50 years, spending a significant portion of his career defending free speech, often to his own detriment. The pro-Palestinian protests at Columbia University and colleges across the country have highlighted the topic of free speech. Siegel joined NY1’s Errol Louis to discuss how the protests resemble demonstrations from the past. He explained that it is time that people began to understand the First Amendment properly. Siegel also reflected on his storied legal career, including his tenure at the New York Civil Liberties Union and how he helped create the Civilian Complaint Review Board. Finally, they talked about how he advocates for families who lost loved ones on Sept. 11.   Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
48:31 5/2/24
Zephyr Teachout: Protecting kids from online danger
An increase in teen depression and mental health disorders over the last decade has largely been attributed to the widespread adoption of the smartphone by adolescents. Parents are obsessively worrying about screen time and the effects it could have on their children. One such parent is Zephyr Teachout, attorney, author, political candidate and associate professor of law at Fordham University. Teachout joined NY1’s Errol Louis to discuss the dangerous and addictive content teens are being fed by social media platforms. They also talked about the government’s role in regulation, the status of the TikTok ban and how the algorithm preys on children’s weaknesses.  Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
33:00 4/25/24
Basil Seggos: New York’s environmental defender is stepping down 
For more than eight years, Basil Seggos had led the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation, trying to help New York in its transition away from fossil fuels. Now leaving office, Seggos joined NY1’s Errol Louis to discuss New York’s pivotal 2019 climate law and his own tenure with two different governors. They also spoke about Seggos’ dramatic first day in office and his top priority for his successor. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
26:03 4/18/24
Harry Siegel: A column on subway crime sparks an online attack by the NYPD
After criticizing police strategy aimed at combatting subway crime, New York Daily News columnist Harry Siegel found himself under attack online by the NYPD. The mayor later defended police brass for going after Siegel and the police commanders doubled down on their harsh words in several interviews, including one with NY1. Siegel joined NY1's Errol Louis for a candid discussion about the exchanges that have taken place since the op-ed appeared, as well as his intentions behind writing the piece. They also touched on the complicated relationships the press can have with the NYPD and Siegel’s role as senior editor of the news outlet "The City." Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
41:18 4/11/24
Chris Norwood: A new combat mission against diabetes
With diabetes continuing to disproportionately affect the poor and people of color, the Bronx nonprofit agency Health People is launching a new campaign against the disease. Chris Norwood, the group’s founder and executive director, joined NY1’s Errol Louis to discuss their new education effort about diabetes as well as what she hopes to get out of the upcoming state budget. They also talked about some concerns over weight-loss drugs like Ozempic that are being used in the diabetes battle. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
25:38 4/4/24
Eric Klinenberg: Following seven lives in ‘the year that changed everything’
Trying to make sense of one of the most pivotal years in American history, scholar Eric Klinenberg decided to focus on 2020 by using seven New Yorkers as his lens. With social unrest, economic turbulence and a presidential election as his backdrop, Klinenberg tells a story that is still far from finished in his new book, “2020: One City, Seven People, and the Year Everything Changed.”  Klinenberg joined NY1's Errol Louis to discuss these seven stories and why he thought his approach was the best way to tackle 2020. They also discussed whether New York is any better equipped to handle another pandemic.  Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
31:12 3/28/24
Cannabis at the crossroads — A live discussion
Recently, NY1’s Errol Louis moderated a panel discussion, hosted by Vital City and the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, on New York’s rocky rollout of legalized cannabis — examining what policies and practices are needed to create a viable market moving forward.  Louis was joined for the discussion by Rosalind Adams, a reporter at The City, Dr. Yasmin Hurd, Ward-Coleman chair of Translational Neuroscience and the director of the Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai, and Alfredo Angueira, chief compliance officer and founding partner of CONBUD, the first legal cannabis dispensary run and operated by formerly incarcerated individuals. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
84:09 3/21/24
Elizabeth Holtzman: A pioneer looks back and ahead to our political future
Few women have had a bigger impact on New York City politics than Elizabeth Holtzman. A Brooklyn native, Holtzman embarked on a political career over 50 years ago. She was an aide to Mayor John Lindsay in the late 60s and then became the youngest woman at the time ever elected to Congress at 31 years old. She was also the Brooklyn district attorney and the New York City comptroller — the only woman ever to hold either of those positions. Holtzman joined NY1’s Errol Louis for a look back at her many years in politics. They discussed her role in the Nixon impeachment investigation while serving on the House Judiciary Committee in 1974. They also touched on her long relationship with President Joe Biden, her thoughts on Republican candidate Donald Trump, and the many accomplishments of women in politics since she started. Finally, she explained what made her initially enter public service and why it still matters to her. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
44:35 3/14/24
Tricia Romano: How the Village Voice revolutionized journalism
The Village Voice is widely considered being America’s first alt weekly newspaper. Started in 1955 by a small group of writers and editors that included Norman Mailer, the radical paper changed journalism. For six decades, the Voice covered politics, news and culture with a blend of energy and brashness, creating a style that inspired other writers and spawned weeklies across the country. Tricia Romano was a nightlife columnist at the Voice and has written a critically acclaimed new book, “The Freaks Came Out to Write: The Definitive History of the Village Voice, the Radical Paper That Changed American Culture.” The oral history, drawing from over 200 interviews, is a colorful account of America’s most iconic weekly newspaper told through the voices of its legendary writers, editors and photographers. Romano joined NY1’s Errol Louis to discuss the book and why she felt compelled to write it after attending a reunion for the paper in 2017. They also touched on some memorable stories from the Village Voice’s 60-year tenure. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
33:25 3/7/24
Terry Golway: Was La Guardia our greatest mayor?
Fighting for the rights of immigrants and the impoverished during the Great Depression, Fiorello La Guardia was considered “America’s mayor” by millions of New Yorkers during his 12 years in office. In a new book about La Guardia, journalist and historian Terry Golway looks at the many political lessons to be learned from the former mayor’s leadership — and how they can be applied today. Golway joined NY1’s Errol Louis to talk about La Guardia’s legacy and discussed his post-mayoral life, the funny story of how an airport opened in his name and how La Guardia would be perceived in today’s political climate.  Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
31:40 2/29/24
Michael Beschloss: What’s at stake in 2024?
There are a little over nine months until the 60th presidential election in November. As the primaries wrap up, it remains clear that it will be a rematch between President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump. Michael Beschloss is an American historian specializing in the United States presidency and is the author of nine books on the topic. He joined NY1's Errol Louis for an interview hosted by Temple Emanuel in Great Neck. They discussed what we can expect from the candidates over the next nine months as the race heats up. They also touched on Trump’s recent remarks regarding NATO, the current dialogue around the age of both candidates and the difficulties in how the media will go about covering the election. They also took questions from members of the congregation. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
57:56 2/22/24
Dr. Uché Blackstock: Tackling racism in our health care system
Racism often ensures that Black Americans get worse results than other groups when they visit the doctor or an emergency room. It not only affects patients: only 2% of physicians in the U.S. are Black women. Dr. Uché Blackstock is trying to level the playing field. A New York-based physician, Blackstock is the author of “Legacy: A Black Physician Reckons with Racism In Medicine,” which addresses the deep inequities in the American health care system. Dr. Blackstock joined NY1’s Errol Louis to discuss her efforts as well as her childhood in Crown Heights as the daughter of a physician, and the potential ramifications of shuttering the SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn.  Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
29:15 2/15/24
Allan Lichtman: The best forecaster of presidential elections for 40 years 
With the presidential race already underway, NY1’s Errol Louis decided to have a candid conversation with Allan Lichtman, an acclaimed historian who has devised a successful system that has — with one exception — correctly predicted the winner of the last ten presidential elections. Lichtman discussed his 13-point checklist for presidential campaigns and where we currently stand in the race. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
28:14 2/8/24
Scott Stringer: Is New York City ready for his second act?
Scott Stringer spent three decades in New York politics before badly losing in the Democratic primary for mayor in 2021. But a few weeks ago, with Mayor Eric Adams facing low poll numbers, the former city comptroller announced he was exploring another run for mayor.  Stringer joined NY1’s Errol Louis for a candid conversation about sexual harassment allegations he faced in 2021 that badly damaged his campaign. They also talked about his upbringing in the world of politics and why he believes he could do a better job than Adams. Finally, they discussed the Adams administration’s struggles with housing, cuts to the city’s pre-K and 3-K programs, and the migrant crisis.  Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
29:59 2/1/24
State of the City: Mayor Adams' big midterm exam
Halfway through his term in office, Mayor Eric Adams delivered his annual State of the City address, detailing proposals covering everything from the ongoing migrant crisis to public safety to housing and the economy. He also said Health Commissioner Dr. Ashwin Vasan has declared social media a public health threat. Joining NY1’s Errol Louis to talk about where things stand in the Adams administration is Nicole Gelinas, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a contributing editor of City Journal, and a columnist at the New York Post. Additionally, they discuss the details of the city’s emergency hotel contracts to shelter migrant families.   Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
36:41 1/25/24
Cea Weaver: Are we closer to fixing N.Y.’s housing problem?
A year after Gov. Kathy Hochul and state lawmakers failed to reach a deal on a housing plan, they’re back at work in the State Capitol with the governor making a more modest proposal to build affordable homes across the state. One person who’s fighting every day to end the crisis is Cea Weaver, who co-founded the Housing Justice for All coalition. Weaver joined NY1’s Errol Louis to discuss the governor’s plans and what may make this year different from the last. They also talked about what’s known as “Good Cause Eviction,” pathways to social housing and the upside to reviving state-subsidized housing programs. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
29:41 1/18/24
Key takeaways from Gov. Hochul’s policy agenda
This week, Gov. Kathy Hochul delivered her third State of the State address, focusing on housing proposals and plans to make the state a safer and more affordable place to live by addressing mental health care — especially in young New Yorkers. Her agenda is much more scaled back than in previous years, as the state faces a $4 billion budget gap and state lawmakers seek reelection. NY1’s Errol Louis was joined by Nick Reisman, state politics reporter of Politico New York, and Ian Pickus, WAMC radio news director, for a detailed look at the address. They analyzed the governor’s focus on crime and public safety, and the notable decision to exclude the migrant crisis from her speech. They also talked about how lawmakers will react to her priorities and how previous administrations have failed to tackle issues like artificial intelligence. And, they discussed Hochul’s other initiatives, such as an investment in swimming lessons and improving access to pools.  Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
35:51 1/11/24
'You Decide': The year review of 2023
This week, in addition to celebrating its five-year anniversary, NY1’s “You Decide” is taking a quick look back at 2023 with an eye on 2024. Errol Louis selected some of his favorite episodes of the podcast from the past 12 months, and discussed why he found each conversation so memorable and relevant to the year ahead. He revisited his interviews with various authors, politicians, activists, the mayor of New York City and many others to see what the future may hold in a year that promises to be even more eventful. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
12:08 1/4/24
Bradley Tusk: Flying cars and mobile voting
Bradley Tusk is no stranger to politics. He was Sen. Chuck Schumer’s communications director and former Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s campaign manager. He was also a political consultant for Uber. All of this experience finds its way into his debut novel “Obvious in Hindsight,” a behind-the-scenes look at a campaign to legalize flying cars in New York City, Los Angeles and Austin, told from the perspectives of a vivid cast of characters — political operatives, venture capitalists, startup founders, TV hosts, union bosses, FBI agents, Russian mobsters — pushing for the campaign’s success and plotting its downfall. Tusk joined Errol Louis to discuss his new book and how its origins lie in a TV series that got derailed by the pandemic and, funny enough, how it contains a fictionalized version of Errol’s nightly show, “Inside City Hall.” The conversation also touches on the pros and cons of mobile voting, as well as venture capitalism, regulatory issues and autonomous vehicles.  Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
46:38 12/28/23
Mario Cuomo: The Last Liberal Part 3 - Hard Times
In late 1991, some Democrats were hopeful that Mario Cuomo would finally agree to run for president. When he didn’t, President-elect Bill Clinton then wanted to appoint him to the Supreme Court. He cast aside these opportunities, and instead lost a bid for a fourth term as governor. Why didn’t Cuomo run for president? Why didn’t he accept Clinton’s appointment? And how did he lose to a relatively unknown freshman state senator named George Pataki? Episode 3 of “Mario Cuomo: The Last Liberal” attempts to answer the questions that have captured the minds of many New Yorkers for decades, while examining Cuomo’s legacy and looking at his life after politics.
40:23 12/21/23
Mario Cuomo: The Last Liberal Part 2 - Great Expectations
Forty years ago, Mario Cuomo began his three-term tenure as governor. He inherited a state that was in the midst of a fiscal crisis and a crime problem. With the help of his top aide, Michael Del Giudice, Cuomo began to tackle the budget and try to get the state in order. To complicate matters, in 1984, Cuomo gave the keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention that thrust him into the national spotlight and led to pressure from Democrats for him to pursue the presidential nomination in future elections. From the perspective of his key advisers and the reporters that covered him, we’ll hear how Cuomo managed to juggle governing and external pressures while keeping his ideals intact, and we’ll learn how the decisions he struggled to make have had a lasting effect on both the state and the country. 
45:44 12/14/23
Mario Cuomo: The Last Liberal Part 1 - Rising up the political ranks
2023 marks 40 years since Mario Cuomo was sworn in as governor of New York for the first time. Cuomo was one of the most unlikely politicians the state had seen in a long time. The child of illiterate working-class immigrants who owned a grocery store in South Jamaica, Cuomo was a public-school genius who found himself graduating at the top of his class at St. John’s Law School. After taking a few pro-bono cases representing homeowners in Queens, Cuomo found himself encouraged to enter politics by legendary journalists Jimmy Breslin and Pete Hamill, as well as NYC Mayor John Lindsay. What followed was a wild rise up the ranks, one that included a highly publicized run for mayor, as well as turns as lieutenant governor and New York secretary of state before finally being elected governor. From the perspective of his advisers and the reporters that covered him – some of them speaking about their experiences with Cuomo for the first time – we'll find out how Cuomo managed to become a major political figure in the Democratic Party despite having a background that differed from most elected officials.  See more on our Mario Cuomo series at ny1.com/mariocuomo.
35:49 12/7/23
Introducing…Mario Cuomo: The Last Liberal - A Special Three-Part Series (Trailer)
With Ronald Reagan and the GOP dominating America’s political landscape in the 1980s, Democrats were largely dispirited and looking for someone to push back against a new wave of conservatism. Improbably, Mario Cuomo, the son of a grocer from Queens, became one of their heroes. Serving as governor of New York for 12 years, Cuomo was one of the chief standard-bearers of liberalism at a time when the political pendulum was swinging to the right. Even as many New Yorkers were increasingly worried about crime, Cuomo strongly resisted any calls for the death penalty, saying it made no sense morally or pragmatically. Filled with passion, Cuomo’s address on abortion rights and his keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention in 1984 are still studied today by students of the political craft and by those trying to explain the DNA of the Democratic Party. Cuomo was well-positioned to take his positions and ambitions nationally and launch a presidential campaign in 1992. Why Cuomo never pulled the trigger is one of the great mysteries of New York politics.  Told from the perspective of his key advisors and the reporters that covered him, this special three-part podcast with NY1’s Errol Louis traces the rise of Mario Cuomo, measures his impact on New York and America, and tries to solve the riddle of why Cuomo didn’t run for president.
02:18 12/4/23
GivingTuesday: Nudging the world in the right direction
As we enter the holiday season, we celebrate GivingTuesday, where nonprofit groups hope to inspire people’s generosity. NY1’s Errol Louis is dedicating an episode of “You Decide” to 10 of his favorite charities in New York City. The conversation also includes a quick look back at the past year of “You Decide,“ as well as at an exciting new podcast series that will drop in the weeks to come.  Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
30:52 11/30/23
Naomi Klein: Doppelgänger politics and the 'other Naomi'
“Doppelgänger: A Trip Into the Mirror World” is the most recent book by social activist Naomi Klein. The book has an unlikely premise: Klein has often been confused with author Naomi Wolf. Klein uses this confusion to tell her most personal story yet, but along the way writes of the online paranoia that rose through the pandemic. The “other Naomi” is a rabid anti-vaxxer and conspiracy theorist and, in many ways, Klein’s polar opposite. Klein joined NY1’s Errol Louis to talk about her new book and the allure of the world of conspiracy theories after tragic events occur. They also discussed the public’s fascination with cloning, doppelgänger literature, and the monetization of conspiracy theories. Finally, the conversation touched on the diverging paths she and Wolf took, the Israel-Hamas war and the dangers of using words like “fringe” to describe the far right.  Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
29:40 11/22/23
Joe Sexton: A Brooklyn reporter uncovers a tragedy in Nebraska
Veteran journalist Joe Sexton spent over two decades at the New York Times, where he was both Metro Editor and Sports Editor. Following a lengthy stay at ProPublica, the Brooklyn native started writing a magazine story about two tragic deaths in Omaha stemming from the 2020 George Floyd protests. The magazine piece turned into a book, and this year, the critically acclaimed account, “The Lost Sons of Omaha: Two Young Men in an American Tragedy,” was published. Sexton joined NY1’s Errol Louis for a discussion in front of a live audience at the Center for Brooklyn History. They talked about their careers in journalism, including their early days together at the City Sun, and what drove Sexton to write a book about the deaths. They also weighed in on the death of local newspapers, how social media can both positively and negatively affect how a story gets told, and how “the good old days” weren’t always so good.  Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
77:40 11/16/23
Melissa DeRosa: Former top Cuomo aide tries to flip the script
During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, Melissa DeRosa became a familiar face as she sat by Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s side during his popular daily briefings. As his top aide, she also stood by him amid a barrage of sexual harassment allegations, which led to Cuomo’s resignation in August 2021. Two years later, DeRosa returns with a memoir called “What’s Left Unsaid: My Life at the Center of Power, Politics & Crisis.” She joined NY1’s Errol Louis to discuss her book and the many allegations Cuomo faced. They also discussed the status of the #MeToo movement, as well as her thoughts on Gov. Kathy Hochul. Finally, they talked about some of the decisions the administration made as New York City faced an unprecedented pandemic in March 2020. Join the conversation, weigh in on Twitter using the hashtag #NY1YouDecide or give us a call at 212-379-3440 and leave a message. Or send an email to YourStoryNY1@charter.com.
33:51 11/9/23