Show cover of There's Sometimes a Buggy

There's Sometimes a Buggy

Join Dave and Elise every week for a buggy-ride of cinematic exploration. A bilingual Montreal native and a Prairies hayseed gravitate to Toronto for the film culture, meet on OK Cupid, and spur on each other's movie-love, culminating in this podcast. Expect in-depth discussion of their old favourites (mostly studio-era Hollywood) and their latest frontiers (courtesy of the TIFF Cinematheque and various Toronto rep houses and festivals). The podcast will be comprised of several potentially never-ending series: - Fear & Moviegoing in Toronto: Our Perspectives on Choice Local Retrospectives - Hollywood Studios – Year by Year: Deep-cut dishing on Paramount, MGM, Warner Brothers, RKO, Fox, and Universal items from 1930 to 1948. - Acteurist oeuvre-views of worthy on-camera creatives, beginning with Jennifer Jones and Setsuko Hara. - And a big parade of special subjects hand-chosen by whichever of your hosts happens to have a handle on this buggy that week

Tracks

Acteurist oeuvre-view – Jean Arthur – Part 10: THE DEVIL AND MISS JONES (1941) and THE TALK OF THE TOWN (1942)
This episode of our Jean Arthur Acteurist Oeuvre-view provides us with two examples of Hollywood leftism to discuss: a Norman Krasna department store comedy directed by Sam Wood, The Devil and Miss Jones (1941), and a comedy of ideas directed by George Stevens, The Talk of the Town (1942). We discuss the way The Devil and Miss Jones portrays political radicalism and the difficulty of labor organizing within the framework of a Hollywood fairy tale; and the marriage of moral and intellectual debate to an unconventional, utopic household arrangement in The Talk of the Town.  Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:        THE DEVIL AND MISS JONES (1941) [dir. Sam Wood] 0h 43m 27s:      THE TALK OF THE TOWN (1942) [dir. George Stevens]     +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
74:58 12/02/2022
Special Subject – Noirvember Sirk – LURED (1947); SLEEP, MY LOVE (1948); SHOCKPROOF (1949) and THUNDER ON THE HILL (1951)
Our November Special Subject is Sirk Noir-vember: four noir or noir-adjacent movies directed by Douglas Sirk in the late 1940s/early 50s: Lured (1947), Sleep, My Love (1948), Shockproof (1949), and Thunder on the Hill (1951). We discuss to what extent these films can be considered "auteur" works and in what ways they qualify as noirs; Sirk's use of actor personas and his own "acteur" theory; the relative merits of Sam Fuller's and Harry Cohn's ideas about how to end a movie; nun movie tropes; and much more.  Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:        Sirk in Hollywood 0h 6m 34s:        LURED (1947) [dir. Douglas Sirk] 0h 31m 54s:      SLEEP, MY LOVE (1948) [dir. Douglas Sirk] 0h 45m 02s:      SHOCKPROOF (1949) [dir. Douglas Sirk] 0h 57m 39s:      THUNDER ON THE HILL (1951) [dir. Douglas Sirk]   +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
74:29 11/25/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – 20th Century Fox – 1941: I WAKE UP SCREAMING & CONFIRM OR DENY + FEAR & MOVIEGOING IN TORONTO – Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), The Palm Beach Story (1942) and Melody o
American involvement in WWII is imminent at the time of these 20th Century Fox selections from late 1941 for this Studios Year by Year episode, producing what may be the first "true" noir, I Wake Up Screaming (directed by H. Bruce Humberstone), and a plea for American solidarity with England, war correspondent movie Confirm or Deny (directed by Archie Mayo, from a story co-written by Samuel Fuller). We talk about what it might mean to be a "true" noir and what might differentiate the Fox noir from the noirs of other studios, about the very special screen presence of Joan Bennett (entering her noir phase), and about cozy war films. And in our Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto segment we briefly discuss three movies: Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (directed by Richard Brooks), Preston Strurges' The Palm Beach Story, and Bodil Ipsen's Melody of Murder.    Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:      I WAKE UP SCREAMING (dir. H. Bruce Humberstone) 0h 42m 23s:      CONFIRM OR DENY (dir. Archie Mayo) 1h 04m 12s:      FEAR & MOVIEGOING IN TORONTO – Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), The Palm Beach Story (1942) and Melody of Murder  (1944)     Studio Film Capsules provided by The Films of Twentieth Century Fox by Tony Thomas & Aubrey Solomon Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com   We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join!   
78:17 11/18/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Jean Arthur – Part 9: TOO MANY HUSBANDS (1940) and ARIZONA (1940)
This week's Jean Arthur Acteurist Oeuvre-view episode is a directed-by-Wesley Ruggles double feature of disparate genres: the bigamy farce Too Many Husbands and the epic Western Arizona (both 1940). Although the films, both with screenplays by Ruggles' frequent collaborator Claude Binyon, interrogate marriage and gender respectively, one ends with the reassertion of patriarchal authority, while the other... fails to stick to its (or her) guns. We talk about Ruggles' special version of the romantic comedy triangle, Jean Arthur's erotic face journeys, and the limits of Hollywood's tolerance for gender nonconformity in female stars.  Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:        TOO MANY HUSBANDS [dir. Wesley Ruggles] 0h 25m 48s:      ARIZONA [dir. Wesley Ruggles]   +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
86:03 11/11/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – Warner Brothers – 1941: THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE (dir. Raoul Walsh) and MANPOWER (dir. Raoul Walsh)
For our Warner Bros. 1941 episode we watched two Raoul Walsh love triangle movies: Manpower, in which Edward G. Robinson pines for Marlene Dietrich, who pines for George Raft; and one of Dave's all-time faves, The Strawberry Blonde, in which Olivia de Havilland pines for James Cagney, who pines for Rita Hayworth. We discuss Walsh's treatment of women as desiring subjects; the productive tension between acteur and studi-auteur in the pairing of Dietrich and Warner Bros.; Walsh's unHawksian take on male dynamics in dangerous workplaces, and more. But what makes these uniquely Warner Bros. pictures? You'll have to listen to the episode to find out.  Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:      THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE [dir. Raoul Walsh] 0h 44m 26s:      MANPOWER [dir. Raoul Walsh]   Studio Film Capsules provided by The Warner Brothers Story by John Douglas Eames Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com   We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
86:42 11/04/2022
Halloween 2022 Special Subject – The Haunted Mizoguchi – UGETSU (1953) and SANSHO THE BAILIFF (1954)
Our Halloween 2022 subject is "The Haunted Mizoguchi," for which we looked at two films made by Kenji Mizoguchi toward the end of his life: the supernatural fantasy Ugetsu (1953) and a film we agree is a candidate for best movie ever made, Sansho the Bailiff (1954). We use Mizoguchi's explicit treatment of ghostly themes in Ugetsu as a springboard for discussing the haunting qualities of Sansho the Bailiff and the relationship between nature, the transcendent, and the miraculous in the film. We also consider the question of whether the film argues for political action or resignation as the best way of dealing with the systemic injustice from which we can't seem to escape and the threat of hopelessness.    Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:        UGETSU (1953) [dir. Kenji Mizoguchi] 0h 34m 32s:      SANSHO THE BAILIFF (1954) [dir. Kenji Mizoguchi] 1h 20m 29s:      Listener Mail with Daves and Elise – on Capra, Comics & Noir City      +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
88:24 10/28/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Jean Arthur – Part 8: ONLY ANGELS HAVE WINGS (1939) and MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON (1939) + Fear & Moviegoing in Toronto – L’amour par terre (1984)
In this week's Acteurist Oeuvre-view episode we arrive at arguably Jean Arthur's biggest year of stardom, 1939, with her appearance opposite Cary Grant in Only Angels Have Wings, Howard Hawks' ode to male professionalism, and her iconic performance in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, opposite Jimmy Stewart. We do our best to get at the essences of Hawks and Capra and consider whether Arthur can embody both the Hawksian and the Capra woman. And in our Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto segment, we discuss Jacques Rivette's Love on the Ground (1984) as a kind of inversion of his surrealist classic Celine and Julie Go Boating.    Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:        ONLY ANGELS HAVE WINGS (1939) [dir. Howard Hawks] 0h 42m 44s:      MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON (1939) [dir. Frank Capra] 1h 26m 57s:      Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto – L’amour par terre  AKA Love on the Ground (1984)  by Jacques Rivette   +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
98:07 10/21/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – MGM – 1941: A WOMAN’S FACE and THE TRIAL OF MARY DUGAN + FEAR & MOVIEGOING IN TORONTO: BUCK AND THE PREACHER (1972)
For this MGM 1941 episode, we again pair a classic with a rarity: Cukor's A Woman's Face, starring Joan Crawford, Melvyn Douglas, and Conrad Veidt, and The Trial of Mary Dugan, directed by Norman Z. McLeod and starring Laraine Day, Robert Young, and Tom Conway (aka "The Nice George Sanders"). We discuss A Woman's Face as a proto-Warner Bros. Crawford noir, the persona of Robert Young, the uses of no-subtext acting, and the starkly different construction of these two women-on-trial movies. And in our Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto segment, we take a brief look at Buck and the Preacher, directed by and starring Sidney Poitier (and co-starring future acteurist spotlight subject Ruby Dee, although she doesn’t get a lot of screen time in this one).    Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:      A WOMAN’S FACE [dir. George Cukor] 0h 50m 59s:      THE TRIAL OF MARY DUGAN [dir. Norman Z. McLeod] 1h 21m 53s:      FEAR & MOVIEGOING IN TORONTO:  Sidney Poitier’s Buck and the Preacher  (1972)   Studio Film Capsules provided by The MGM Story by John Douglas Eames Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com   We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
88:38 10/13/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Jean Arthur – Part 7: EASY LIVING (1937) and YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU (1938) + Fear & Moviegoing in Toronto – DRACULA (1931) & BRAM STOKER’S DRACULA (1992)
In our Jean Arthur Acteurist Oeuvre-view this week, we look at two of Arthur's best-known comedies, Easy Living (1937), directed by Mitchell Leisen, with a screenplay by Preston Sturges, and You Can't Take It With You (1938), directed by Frank Capra. Dave explains why Jean Arthur's performance in Easy Living is his all-time favourite comedy performance by an actress. (Hint: it involves a pig called "Wafford.") We ponder Arthur's transformation into a glamorous romantic lead, even as she retains her (slightly off-kilter) ordinary person qualities, and the contrasting comic visions of Sturges and Capra. Then, in our Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto segment, we discuss our second double feature of Tod Browning's Dracula and Francis Ford Coppola's Bram Stoker's Dracula, the subject of our 2019 Halloween episode. This time around we find a lot to say about Coppola's Dracula as a Dionysian Christ figure who can lead Winona Ryder out of the death-in-life of civilization.  Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:        EASY LIVING (1937) [dir. Mitchell Leisen] 0h 49m 27s:      Jean Arthur v. Harry Cohn – 1937/1938 (from John Oller’s Jean Arthur: The Actress Nobody Knew) 0h 54m 19s:      YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU (1938) [dir. Frank Capra]   1h 22m 35s:      Fear & Moviegoing in Toronto – DRACULA (1931) by Tod Browning & BRAM STOKER’S DRACULA (1992) by Francis Ford Coppola   +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
96:31 10/07/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – Paramount – 1941: THE LADY EVE & REACHING FOR THE SUN + FEAR & MOVIEGOING IN TORONTO: THE HUDUSCKER PROXY (1994) & FEMME FATALE (2002)
A tonally disparate pair of great films for Paramount 1941: Preston Sturges' The Lady Eve, starring Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda, one of the greatest movies ever made, according to Elise; and a real rarity, William Wellman's Reaching for the Sun, starring some important Sturges actors: Joel McCrea, Ellen Drew, and Eddie Bracken. We interrogate the strange central relationship in The Lady Eve, examining its sadistic, maternal, narcissistic, you-name-it qualities, and Sturges’ masterful blending of comedy tropes, melodrama structure, and painful personal psychology. Then we turn to the interesting mixture of "universal" (20th century Western) gender tropes and modern modifications of them in Wellman's tale of a man torn between urban opportunity and Thoreauvian freedom. Then, in our Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto segment, we briefly discuss the Coen brothers' The Hudsucker Proxy (1994) and its curious misunderstandings of Capra, and Brian De Palma's brilliant Femme Fatale and its channeling of Lynch and Verhoeven, but with De Palma's peculiar mixture of sweetness and satire.  Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:      THE LADY EVE [dir. Preston Sturges] 0h 46m 28s:      REACHING FOR THE SUN [dir. WILLIAM A. WELLMAN] 1h 14m 35s:      FEAR & MOVIEGOING IN TORONTO: THE HUDUSCKER PROXY (1994) by Joel and Ethan Coen & FEMME FATALE (2002) by Brian DePalma   Studio Film Capsules provided by The Paramount Story by John Douglas Eames Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com   We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join!   
83:35 09/30/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Jean Arthur – Part 6: MORE THAN A SECRETARY (1936) and HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT (1937)
In this week's entry in our Jean Arthur Acteurist Oeuvre-view series, we look at Alfred E. Green's comedy More Than A Secretary (1936) and Frank Borzage's genre-defying screwball melodrama History Is Made at Night (1937), pairing Arthur with up-and-coming romantic lead Charles Boyer. We compare More Than A Secretary with Green's better-known film about sexual politics in patriarchal office culture, Baby Face, and the possibly influential blending of genres and the lovers' achievement of Borzagean transcendence in History Is Made at Night, which gave Arthur her most glamourous role up to that point.    Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:      MORE THAN A SECRETARY (1936) [dir. Alfred E. Green] 0h 36m 37s:    HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT (1937) [dir. Frank Borzage]   +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
90:05 09/23/2022
September Special Subject – German Sirk Sampler – Part 2 – THE FINAL CHORD (1936) & CHEATED BY THE WIND (1937) + Fear & Moviegoing in Toronto: MARNIE (1964)
In Part 2 of our look at The German Sirk, the director discovers "cinematic values" with two unhinged melodramas that place a strong emphasis on music, Schlußakkord (Final Chord/Final Accord), from 1936, and La Habanera, from 1937. We dig into a couple of Sirk's complicated "villains" in these movies about extra-marital love triangles, and discuss La Habanera's Nazi propaganda overtones and the ways in which the film possibly subverts them. Then, in our Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto segment, we give our impressions of Alfred Hitchcock's deeply personal, disturbing, and bonkers Marnie, an old favourite of Elise's and new favourite of Dave's.    Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:      THE FINAL CHORD (1936) aka THE FINAL ACCORD 0h 32m 51s:    CHEATED BY THE WIND (1937) aka LA HABANERA 0h 51m 49s:    Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto – Alfred Hitchcock’s Marnie (1964)   +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
60:04 09/16/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – Universal – 1940: THE HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES and THE INVISIBLE MAN RETURNS
For this Universal 1940 Studios Year by Year episode, we look at a Vincent Price double feature that also features the same director (Joe May), cinematographer (Milton Krasner), and key screenwriter (Lester Cole, who will become one of the Hollywood Ten): The House of the Seven Gables, an adaptation of the Nathaniel Hawthorne novel, and The Invisible Man Returns, the first sequel to James Whale's adaptation of H. G. Wells' novel. We talk non-naturalistic acting, the genius of Vincent Price, and the progressive moment of 1940, when anti-fascism gives courage to Hollywood's leftists.    Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:      THE HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES [dir. Joe May] 0h 45m 28s:      THE INVISIBLE MAN RETURNS [dir. Joe May]   Studio Film Capsules provided by The Universal Story by Clive Hirschhorn Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com   We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join!   
70:26 09/09/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Jean Arthur – Part 5: MR. DEEDS GOES TO TOWN (1936), THE EX-MRS. BRADFORD (1936) & ADVENTURE IN MANHATTAN (1936) + Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto
In this week's Jean Arthur Acteurist Oeuvre-view cast, we revisit Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) for thoughts old and (hopefully) new, and then look at two minor screwball comedy variations on genre films from 1936, the RKO murder mystery The Ex-Mrs. Bradford, co-starring William Powell, and a weird little riff on Mr. Deeds combined with a crime thriller, Adventure in Manhattan, co-starring Joel McCrea. Join us as we discuss Gary Cooper's complex performance and creepy sexlessnes and Arthur's wholesome lack of naivety and self-lovemaking in Mr. Deeds, a deeply romantically and politically confused movie, and the reasons why Arthur doesn't (and shouldn't) give screwball performances in her most famous roles.  Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:      MR. DEEDS GOES TO TOWN (1936) [dir. Frank Capra] 0h 31m 59s:    THE EX-MRS. BRADFORD (1936) [dir. Stephen Roberts] 0h 41m 54s:    ADVENTURE IN MANHATTAN (1936) [dir. Edward Ludwig] 0h 56m 03s:    Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto – CELINE ET JULIE VONT EN BATEAU (1972) +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
63:52 09/02/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – RKO – 1940: VIGIL IN THE NIGHT & ABE LINCOLN IN ILLINOIS
This week's studio is RKO, 1940, and we have two great movies: Vigil in the Night, starring Carole Lombard as a saintly nurse and Anne Shirley as her flawed sister in George Stevens' noirish medical drama; and Abe Lincoln in Illinois, based on Robert E. Sherwood's play, with Raymond Massey reprising his stage role of Abraham Lincoln. We discuss the latter as an anti-fascist film and argue for both films as examples of RKO's particular brand of progressivism, which continues even after the departure of Pandro S. Berman.    Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:      VIGIL IN THE NIGHT [dir. George Stevens] 0h 47m 01s:      ABE LINCOLN IN ILLINOIS [dir. John Cromwell]   Studio Film Capsules provided by The RKO Story by Richard B. Jewell & Vernon Harbin Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com   We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
93:51 08/26/2022
August Special Subject – German Sirk Sampler – Part 1 – THE GIRL FROM THE MARSH CROFT (1935) & PILLARS OF SOCIETY (1936)
Our Special Subject for August is also our first look at German filmmaking under the Nazis, with two mid-1930s films by left-wing director and future Hollywood auteur Douglas Sirk: The Girl from the Marsh Croft, based on the novel by Selma Lagerlöf, and Pillars of Society, based on the play by Henrik Ibsen. We consider the question of how it was possible to make liberal films under these circumstances and find early evidence of Sirk's interest in "split characters" and unconventional protagonists.    Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:        Introductory discussion on Sirk at UFA during the 1933 to 1937 period 0h 13m 15s:      THE GIRL FROM THE MARSH CROFT (1935) [dir. Douglas Sirk] 0h 38m 15s:      PILLARS OF SOCIETY (1936) [dir. Douglas Sirk]   +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
61:47 08/19/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Jean Arthur – Part 4: THE DEFENSE RESTS (1934), THE PUBLIC MENACE (1935) & IF YOU COULD ONLY COOK (1935)
In this week's Acteurist Oeuvre-view episode, we look at 3 Jean Arthur movies: The Defense Rests (1934), an excellent corrupt lawyer drama that we were previously unable to find; and from 1935, two very different romantic comedies featuring real or pretend marriages of convenience, The Public Menace and If You Could Only Cook. The simultaneously idealistic and pragmatic young lawyer, screwball liar, and Depression comedy heroine she plays in each of these films respectively give us several aspects of Arthur's emerging screen persona to discuss in this last moment before she finds true fame.    Time Codes: 0h 1m 00s:      THE DEFENSE RESTS (1934) [dir. Lambert Hillyer] 0h 35m 56s:    THE PUBLIC MENACE (1935) [dir. Erle C. Kenton] 0h 46m 09s:    IF YOU COULD ONLY COOK (1935) [dir. William A. Seiter] +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
83:37 08/12/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – 20th Century Fox – 1940: BRIGHAM YOUNG & JOHNNY APOLLO
For this Fox 1940 episode, we look at a couple of films with the same director (Henry Hathaway), same cinematographer (Arthur Miller), and same nominal star (Tyrone Power), but radically different stories. Brigham Young tells the story of the persecution of the Mormons and their journey westward from Illinois to the Great Salt Lake, recasting this American epic as an implicit anti-Nazi tale with progressive values. Then we shift from Fox's traditional sophisticated "rural" storytelling to their new urban focus with the crime drama Johnny Apollo, which casts a cool eye on the American system in this moment of transition from Great Depression to WWII.  Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:      BRIGHAM YOUNG [dir. Henry Hathaway] 0h 42m 50s:      JOHNNY APOLLO [dir. Henry Hathaway]   Studio Film Capsules provided by The Films of 20th Century Fox by Tony Thomas & Aubrey Solomon Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com   We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join!   
64:38 08/05/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Jean Arthur – Part 3: PUBLIC HERO NO. 1 (1935) and DIAMOND JIM (1935)
In this week's Jean Arthur Acteurist Oeuvre-view episode, we look at two more movies from 1935, Public Hero No. 1 (directed by J. Walter Ruben for MGM) and Diamond Jim (directed by A. Edward Sutherland for Universal, with a screenplay by Preston Sturges). In the first, Arthur injects some screwball swagger into a Code-era gangster drama with an FBI agent hero; in the second, she has a dual role as the love(s) of Edward Arnold's life. We consider the qualities Arthur brings to these films, for which she was loaned out by Columbia, and marvel at the dark oddity of Diamond Jim, made not long before the advent of the post-Laemmle banker regime at Universal that thwarted Preston Sturges' first shot at directing.  Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:  PUBLIC HERO NO. 1 (1935) [dir. J. Walter Ruben] 0h 30m 17s:  DIAMOND JIM (1935) {dir. A. Edward Sutherland] +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
60:45 07/29/2022
July Special Subject – Duels in Max Ophüls – LIEBELEI (1933); LETTER FROM AN UNKOWN WOMAN (1948); and THE EARRINGS OF MADAME DE… (1953)
Our Special Subject for this month, Duels in Max Ophüls, covers films from all three decades of the itinerant filmmaker's career: Liebelei (1933), made in Germany; Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948), made in Hollywood; and Madame de... (1953), made in France. We consider the proposition that Ophüls' films are about superficially superficial people, and examine the evolution of a certain set of characters and scenarios in these three films dealing with the subject of tragic love and its (futile?) transformative effects.    Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:  LIEBELEI (1934) [dir. Max Ophüls] 0h 37m 18s:  LETTER FROM AN UNKOWN WOMAN (1948) [dir. Max Ophüls] 0h 59m 41s:  THE EARRINGS OF MADAME DE… (1953) [dir. Max Ophüls]   +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
85:52 07/22/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – Warner Brothers – 1940: THE LETTER & ALL THIS, AND HEAVEN TOO
Our Warner Bros. 1940 episode this time is a Bette Davis double feature in which Bette plays the Other Woman in two melodramas based on real-life sex-and-murder scandals, but the Wronged Woman in only one. We discuss the combination of sexual repression and critique of colonialism in William Wyler's The Letter and Anatole Litvak's study of societal constraints and thwarted romance with the very different setting of the last years of the Orléans monarchy in mid-19th century Paris, All This, and Heaven Too. Then, in a quick and dirty Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto segment, we evaluate David Cronenberg's mind-fuck gaming movie, eXistenZ, from 1999 (with spoilers, so skip it if you want your mind to be a virgin for the experience).  Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:      THE LETTER [dir. William Wyler] 0h 41m 01s:      ALL THIS, AND HEAVEN TOO [dir. Anatole Litvak] 1h 10m 09s:      Fear & Moviegoing in Toronto – eXistenZ (1999) by David Cronenberg   Studio Film Capsules provided by The Warner Brothers Story by Clive Hirschhorn Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com   We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join!   
76:04 07/15/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Jean Arthur – Part 2: THE WHOLE TOWN’S TALKING (1935) and PARTY WIRE (1935)
In our second Jean Arthur Acteurist Oeuvre-view episode, Arthur moves into her A-picture period at Columbia with John Ford's curious comedy/crime melodrama, The Whole Town's Talking, starring Edward G. Robinson in a dual role, and Erle C. Kenton's Children's Hour-reminiscent Party Wire. While we see more of the familiar Arthur comedy persona emerge in The Whole Town's Talking, she gets to show off her quiet moral authority and perspicacity in Party Wire, playing a woman who becomes the victim of town gossip. We make the case for Party Wire as a small-town satire worthy of standing alongside Stevens' Alice Adams, Sturges' The Miracle of Morgan's Creek, and Billy Wilder's Kiss Me, Stupid, and find more evidence for the secret feminism of Harry Cohn.    Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:  THE WHOLE TOWN’S TALKING (1935) [dir. John Ford] 0h 25m 41s: PARTY WIRE (1935) [dir. Erle C. Kenton] 0h 55m 31s:  Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto - THE RED DETACHMENT OF WOMEN (1961) [dir. Xie Jin]    +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
66:29 07/08/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – MGM – 1940: NORTHWEST PASSAGE & STRANGE CARGO
An odd pairing for this MGM 1940 episode: King Vidor's Northwest Passage, which is not about finding the Northwest Passage at all but about an attack on an Abenaki village by an independent ranger company attached to the British Army; and Frank Borzage's mystical prison break movie, Strange Cargo. We make the argument for a Starship Troopers reading of Northwest Passage before grappling with the many issues of Strange Cargo, from Borzage's use of Crawford and Gable's star personas, to the movie's theodicy, to the many Code-defying topics it deals with. We find a tonal similarity with the poetic realism movement in French cinema of the 1930s, and consider Borzage's treatment of love, salvation and gender.  Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:      NORTHWEST PASSAGE [dir. King Vidor] 0h 30m 24s:      STRANGE CARGO [dir. Frank Borzage] 1h 17m 11s:      Fear & Moviegoing in Toronto – Kinuyo Tanaka’s Love Under the Crucifix (1962)   Studio Film Capsules provided by The MGM Story by John Douglas Eames Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com   We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
83:33 07/01/2022
June Special Subject – Silent Dreyer Sampler – MICHAEL (1924) & MASTER OF THE HOUSE (1925)
This Week's Special Subject is a look at the early silent cinema of Danish master Carl Theodor Dreyer, during the years preceding The Passion of Joan of Arc. We discuss Michael (1924), about the relationship between a famous painter and his male model, and Master of the House (1925), a comedy about the taming of a tyrannical patriarch. Subjects include Dreyer's unique take on the visionary possibilities of love, which can allow you to transcend ordinary human experience in one way or another; and the interrelationship of patriarchy, matriarchy, and the use of violence and fear in maintaining domestic discipline. And in our Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto segment, we briefly discuss Carné's romantic epic Children of Paradise (1945), generally considered one of the great masterpieces of French cinema, and another Kinuyo Tanaka film, Girls of the Night (1961), about the consequences for sex workers when prostitution was proscribed by law in mid-1950s Japan.    Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:     Brief Intro. Carl Theodor Dreyer 0h 10m 29s:     MICHAEL (1924) [Dir. Carl Th. Dreyer] 0h 31m 35s:      MASTER OF THE HOUSE (1925) [Dir. Carl Th. Dreyer] 0h 49m 19s:      Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto – Carné’s ENFANTS DU PARADIS & Tanaka’s GIRLS OF THE NIGHT   +++ * Listen to our guest episode on The Criterion Project (coming next week!) – a discussion of Late Spring * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
61:30 06/24/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Jean Arthur – Part 1 – WHIRLPOOL (1934) and THE MOST PRECIOUS THING IN LIFE (1934)
In our inaugural Jean Arthur Acteurist Oeuvre-view episode, we join Gladys Georgianna Greene as she signs on at Columbia Pictures, two years before her star-making team-up with Frank Capra. Her first two films for Columbia, Whirlpool and The Most Precious Thing in Life, are a couple of curious weepies with missing-parent plots that allow Arthur to play first the daughter, then the mother, but never the love interest. First, Dave gives us an account of why Jean Arthur is so important to him, and Elise explains what it has to do with Shakespeare's Rosalind. Then, in our Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto segment, we briefly discuss the first two Kinuyo Tanaka films where she takes on a real auteur role, Forever a Woman, based on the true story of a poet who died of breast cancer, which we saw as a kind of cross between Dark Victory and My Left Foot, and the political epic The Wandering Princess, which shows the events of WWII from the perspective of a Japanese noblewoman who marries into the Manchurian puppet dynasty.  Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:    Prolegomenon To All Future Jean Arthurs 0h 31m 06s:    WHIRLPOOL (1934) [dir. Roy William Neil] 0h 59m 47s:    THE MOST PRECIOUS THING IN LIFE (1934) [dir. Lambert Hillyer] 1h 31m 02s:    Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto – Kinuyo Tanaka’s FOREVER A WOMAN (1955) & THE WANDERING PRINCESS (1960)   +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
100:19 06/17/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – Paramount – 1940: THE GREAT MCGINTY & THE WAY OF ALL FLESH + Fear and Moviegoing in Toronto
For this 1940 Paramount episode, an Akim Tamiroff (and Muriel Angelus) double feature in which we unlock the secrets of Preston Sturges' inspiration. First, we look at The Way of All Flesh (directed by Louis King), a little-known proto-noir Christmas movie that seems to have taken its inspiration from Nathaniel Hawthorne, as filtered through the sensibilities of top screenwriters Lenore Coffee and Jules Furthman. Then we move on to the first movie directed by dynamo screenwriter-turned-sui generis-director Preston Sturges, The Great McGinty, which directly references the plot of The Way of All Flesh in its prologue. We make our case for the evolution of The Miracle of Morgan's Creek out of both movies and talk Sturges, artificial families, and lost fathers.    Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:    THE WAY OF ALL FLESH [dir. Lewis King] 0h 36m 26s:    THE GREAT MCGINTY [dir. Preston Sturges] 1h 06m 00s:    Fear & Moviegoing in Toronto – Kinuyo Tanaka’s Love Letter (1953) and The Moon Has Risen (1955)   Studio Film Capsules provided by The Paramount Story by John Douglas Eames Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy
79:52 06/10/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Daniel Day-Lewis – Part 8: NINE (2009) & LINCOLN (2012) + Daniel Acteur Top 10s
In our final Daniel Day-Lewis Acteurist Oeuvreview episode, we look at a commercial and critical flop, Rob Marshall's Nine (2009), a musical based on Fellini's celebrated semi-autobiographical film 8 1/2, and a commercial and critical triumph, Steven Spielberg's Lincoln (2012), covering the final four months of Abraham Lincoln's life and especially the process of passing the Thirteenth Amendment. We consider how these roles relate to Day-Lewis's screen persona, then launch into a discussion of his entire career as we each give our Top 10 Daniel Day-Lewis performances. Has Day-Lewis been "typecast" by critics? And how do his best roles serve his unique qualities as an actor and personality? Find out what we think (and feel free to tell us what you think)!    Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:    NINE (2009) [dir. Rob Marshall] 0h 22m 37s:    LINCOLN (2012) [dir. Steven Spielberg] 0h 50m 04s:    Daniel Day-Lewis Wrap-Up & Top 10s   +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
75:35 06/03/2022
May Special Subject – Jacques Becker Sampler - ANTOINE ET ANTOINETTE (1947); RENDEZ-VOUS DE JUILLET (1949); CASQUE D’OR (1952) and TOUCHEZ PAS AU GRISBI (1954)
Join your hosts as they race the clock to adumbrate the myriad merits of French Golden Age Master, Jacques Becker! We key in on the director’s ingenious use of diverse genres to drop diegetic depth charges into the abyss of gendered subjectivity at midcentury. From the nerve-wracking rom-complications of Antoine et Antoinette to the Bert n’ Ernie gangster pyjama party of Touchez pas au grisbi, no four films have ever done a better (or more rapturously entertaining) job of laying bare the unbecoming banality of being under Patriarchy.   Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:    ANTOINE ET ANTOINETTE (1947) [dir. Jacques Becker] 0h 36m 27s:    RENDEZ-VOUS DE JUILLET (1949) [dir. Jacques Becker] 0h 56m 15s:    CASQUE D’OR (1952) [dir. Jacques Becker] 1h 21m 51s:    TOUCHEZ PAS AU GRISBI (1954) [dir. Jacques Becker]   +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
96:08 05/27/2022
Hollywood Studios Year-by-Year – Universal – 1939: WHEN TOMORROW COMES & THE HOUSE OF FEAR
Universal, 1939: we continue the saga of John Stahl's final years with the banker regime with When Tomorrow Comes, a frankly pro-labour romance, full of eccentric charm, that rewrites the fate of Irene Dunne's Back Street character while reuniting the actress with Charles Boyer after their success in Love Affair. Then we turn to the studio's B mode with Joe May's intermittently audacious, but consistently funny, murder/haunting mystery The House of Fear, about an ill-fated stage production.  Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:    WHEN TOMORROW COMES [dir. John M. Stahl] 0h 51m 32s:    THE HOUSE OF FEAR [dir. Joe May]   Studio Film Capsules provided by The Universal Story by Clive Hirschhorn Additional studio information from: The Hollywood Story by Joel W. Finler                                     +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s latest film piece on Preston Sturges, Unfaithfully Yours, and the Narrative role of comedic scapegoating. * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com   We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
70:36 05/20/2022
Acteurist oeuvre-view – Daniel Day-Lewis – Part 7: GANGS OF NEW YORK (2002) & THERE WILL BE BLOOD (2007)
At last we come to the Daniel Day-Lewis perhaps best known to cinephiles: the over-the-top monstrous patriarchs of Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York (2002) and Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood (2007). Working from a couple of the best viewings we've personally had of these movies, we discuss how Bill the Butcher and Daniel Plainview build upon the Day-Lewis persona, how they radically depart from it, and how they set the stage for future developments. If you've ever been embarrassed by your dad's inability to socially interact like a normal human being, this episode is for you.   Time Codes: 0h 01m 00s:    GANGS OF NEW YORK (2002) [dir. Martin Scorsese] 0h 58m 20s:    THERE WILL BE BLOOD (2007) [dir. Paul Thomas Anderson] +++ * Marvel at our meticulously ridiculous Complete Viewing Schedule for the 2020s * Intro Song: “Sunday” by Jean Goldkette Orchestra with the Keller Sisters (courtesy of The Internet Archive) * Read Elise’s piece on Gangs of New York – “Making America Strange Again” * Check out Dave’s new Robert Benchley blog – an attempt to annotate and reflect upon as many of the master humorist’s 2000+ pieces as he can locate – Benchley Data: A Wayward Annotation Project!  Follow us on Twitter at @therebuggy Write to us at therebuggy@gmail.com We now have a Discord server - just drop us a line if you'd like to join! 
103:26 05/13/2022