Show cover of In The Margins

In The Margins

Achieving equality in higher education. The stakes have never been higher. The issues never more complex. Who graduates, and why? Who is getting hired as faculty and what is their experience? In each episode, we will look at issues surrounding students, faculty, diversity and inclusion, and skyrocketing college costs. From critical conversation to news, numbers, and analysis — we’ve got you covered. You can count on Diverse’s In The Margins to bring you the latest, most relevant thought leadership as it pertains to diversity, inclusion, and equity in higher education. As the national expert, we’ve been doing this for almost 40 years in print and on the web (diverseeducation.com). Now we are excited to expand the conversation via this podcast. We will tackle these topics, and more, head-on. Listen weekly for a mix of deep dives, short briefs, expert panels, interviews, and more. We are thrilled to bring it to you here, in In The Margins.

Tracks

EP133: Improving Student Success and Reducing Equity Gaps with Dr. Monica Parrish Trent
Meet Dr. Monica Parrish Trent, chief program and network officer at Achieving the Dream (ATD). Trent's career spans over 25 years, during which she has demonstrated a steadfast commitment to improving student success and reducing equity gaps, particularly for BIPOC and low-income students. Her extensive experience in community colleges has equipped her with a deep understanding of the challenges faced by such marginalized student populations and the strategies necessary to address them effectively.   Join the conversation with Diverse host Ralph Newell and learn how Trent and ATD are working to form an equitable and inclusive environment in higher education.   KEY POINTS:   - Addressing inequality in higher education - Monica’s educational journey and career aspirations - How the ATD organization supports community college students - The importance of culture and heritage in student learning - Supporting the academic journey of student parents - The decline in college enrollment across marginalized groups - The impact of lack of education on communities - The ATD Equity Toolkit and its eight equity principles - The pivotal role of creating an inclusive environment for all students - The need for partnerships with K-12 schools, local employers, and social organizations QUOTABLES:   “Education matters. I am a proponent of higher education… To me, it's so important because without education and without knowing what your rights are, or what the consequences of rights that have been denied for generations… you're not able to access society in the ways that are going to protect you and your family.” — Dr. Monica Parrish Trent   GUEST RESOURCES:    Dr. Monica Parrish Trent - Achieving the Dream  ATD Equity and Justice Institute, May 1-2 Achieving the Dream Convening Highlights Student Success | Diverse: Issues In Higher Education  (diverseeducation.com)  Achieving the Dream Announces 2024 DREAM Scholars | Diverse: Issues In Higher Education (diverseeducation.com)    FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: X (formerly Twitter): http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation   Closed captioning and a live show transcription are available in the video for this episode.   In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by EPYC Media Network (visit at https://www.epyc.co/).
56:49 4/4/24
EP132: Resistance From the Right: Conservatives and The Campus Wars in Modern America with Dr. Lauren Lassabe Shepherd
Meet Dr. Lauren Lassabe Shepherd, an instructor in the College of Liberal Arts, Education, and Human Development at the University of New Orleans and an IUPUI-Society for U.S. Intellectual History Community Scholar, who was recognized as a leading woman by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education for her outstanding contributions in 2024.   In this episode, Diverse host Dr. Jamal Watson engages in a thought-provoking conversation with Shepherd, author of Resistance from the Right: Conservatives and the Campus Wars. The discussion highlights the dominance of progressivism on American college campuses during the late 1960s and early 1970s.   Tune in as Watson and Shepherd discuss the deeper themes behind campus politics, the leadership challenges in academic settings, and the misconceptions surrounding university culture. Shepherd offers valuable insights into the ongoing debates and dynamics shaping higher education. KEY POINTS:   - The history of conservative activism on college campuses - Lack of representation of progressive activism on campuses during 1950s and 1960s - Dealing with campus protests and the history of far-right activism - Conservative critiques of higher education in history - Impact of political pressures on academic freedom - The pivotal role of campus activism and free speech in higher education   QUOTABLES:   “Cancel culture is just rampant. If we compare the current state of our campuses to the state of our campuses during the Vietnam War and the three years that I write about in the book, we're in a much calmer climate than we were back then.” — Dr. Lauren Lassabe Shepherd GUEST RESOURCES:   Lauren Lassabe Shepherd, PhD   FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: X (formerly Twitter): http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation   Closed captioning and a live show transcription are available in the video for this episode.   In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by EPYC Media Network (visit at https://www.epyc.co/).
25:37 3/21/24
EP131: Black Women Ivory Tower: Revealing the Lies of White Supremacy in American Education with Dr. Jasmine L. Harris
In this episode, Diverse host David Pluviose engages in a thought-provoking conversation with Dr. Jasmine L. Harris, author of Black Women Ivory Tower: Revealing the Lies of White Supremacy in American Education.   Harris is an associate professor of African American Studies and coordinator of the African American Studies Program in the Department of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at The University of Texas at San Antonio.   Tune in as Pluviose and Harris discuss the often perilous intersection of race and gender in higher education and the imperative of raising awareness regarding racism and dehumanization within academia — as underscored by reflections on the resignation of Harvard University’s first Black president.   KEY POINTS:   - Harris’ journey through higher education as a Black female - On having perseverance in academia despite lacking knowledge and cultural barriers - Anti-DEI efforts in Texas and their impact on higher education - Black Women in Ivory Tower book, illuminating the intersection of race and gender in higher education - The importance of raising awareness of racism and dehumanization in academia - The anti-Blackness in higher education: Harvard University's removal of first Black president   QUOTABLES:   “One big takeaway is that, especially for Black women, the process is about perseverance. It's not measuring any intellect. It is about the ability to jump through hoops, commit to the sort of particular culture and structure of doctoral programs, and the socialization that they do to turn you into a professor in many ways.” — Dr. Jasmine L. Harris   “The timing for this book is great — and it certainly is. But it's a little sad in that way. We're in 2024; we just watched anti-Blackness remove the first Black president at Harvard University.” — Dr. Jasmine L. Harris GUEST RESOURCES:   Jasmine Harris (drjasmineharris.com) Book — Jasmine Harris (drjasmineharris.com) FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA:   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/Diverse-Issues-In-Higher-Education X (formerly Twitter): https://twitter.com/DiverseIssues Instagram: https://instagram.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation Facebook: https://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation   Closed captioning and live show transcription are available in the video for this episode.   In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by EPYC Media Network (visit at https://www.epyc.co/).
43:02 3/7/24
EP130: Punished for Dreaming: How School Reform Harms Black Children and How We Can Heal with Dr. Bettina L. Love
Meet Dr. Bettina L. Love, the William F. Russell Professor at Teachers College, Columbia University, who delves into the complex dynamics of education reform and highlights its detrimental effects on Black children and communities.   In this episode, Diverse host Dr. Jamal Watson engages in a thought-provoking conversation with Love, author of The New York Times best seller, Punished for Dreaming: How School Reform Harms Black Children and How We Can Heal.   Tune in as Watson and Love discuss the influence of powerful narratives and critical analysis on Black children, challenging the traditional notions of philanthropy, reimagining the concept of harm, and advocating for meaningful repair in education.   KEY POINTS:   - Love’s upbringing and its influence on her understanding of education reform - The intersection of race, education, and policy - The impact of education reforms on black children and communities - On abolition, reparations, and white philanthropy - The importance of centering Black voices in education reform efforts - The pivotal role of shifting societal paradigms for injustices and promoting healing   QUOTABLES:   "Abolition is so much about love and compassion but holding people accountable for harm. I believe, as an abolitionist, we can't have new structures and new understanding if we don't know what has been done to us and who did it to us." – Dr. Bettina Love   "People think change starts in the streets, and it does. But we need change at your house. It's how you raise your children. It's how you talk to your children. It's how you talk to your partner. It's how you talk to the people in your community." – Dr. Bettina Love   GUEST RESOURCES:   Bettina Love Punished for Dreaming: How School Reform Harms Black Children and How We Heal   FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA:   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/Diverse-Issues-In-Higher-Education X (formerly Twitter): https://twitter.com/DiverseIssues Instagram: https://instagram.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation Facebook: https://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation   Closed captioning and live show transcription are available in the video for this episode.   In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by EPYC Media Network (visit at https://www.epyc.co/).
26:34 2/22/24
EP129: HBCU: The Power of Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Meet Dr. Marybeth Gasman, the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Endowed Chair and a Distinguished University Professor at Rutgers University, and Dr. Levon T. Esters, dean of the graduate school and vice provost for graduate education at Penn State University. They co-authored HBCU: The Power of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, published by Johns Hopkins Press.   In this episode, Gasman and Esters join Diverse to discuss their newly released book chronicling the impact of HBCUs.   Tune in as authors Gasman, Esters, and host Dr. Jamal Watson delve into the rich history, personal anecdotes, and enduring impact of HBCUs. Join an empowering conversation of distinctive cultures and identities cultivated within HBCUs that underscores the crucial role of philanthropy and alumni engagement toward sustaining the institutions.   KEY POINTS: - Reasons that led Gasman and Esters to author the HBCU book - On understanding HBCUs' history, mission, and personal experiences - The passion to share inspiring narratives of HBCU alumni - The various opportunities and challenges of HBCUs - Key takeaways from the book, HBCU: The Power of Historically Black Colleges and Universities - On HBCUs' significance with experts and value to society   QUOTABLES: "Sometimes people will talk about HBCUs in derogatory ways. This book gives you all the evidence to be able to talk about HBCUs in incredibly positive ways." – Dr. Marybeth Gasman   “These institutions are of extreme value to our society… For me, being able to be part of this writing experience, being able to learn from those we interviewed and see my experience reflected into those — those interviews were powerful.” – Dr. Levon T. Esters   GUEST RESOURCES:   Marybeth Gasman Levon T. Esters HBCUs: Catalysts for Economic Empowerment and Community Growth   FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: X (formerly Twitter): http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation    Closed captioning and live show transcription are available in the video for this episode.   In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at Instapodcasts.com).
28:25 2/8/24
EP128: Meet The Emerging Scholars of the Year, 2024
Each year, Diverse’s editorial staff chooses Emerging Scholars from nominations that pour in from all over the country. The selections are based on several factors including uniqueness of scholarship, commitment to teaching, community service, scholarly awards, honors, and academic accomplishments.   In this episode, we replay the Jan. 18 Diverse Talk Live! webcast, "Presenting the Emerging Scholars of the Year, 2024." In case you missed it, listen in to meet some outstanding leaders in this year’s cohort.   PANELISTS INCLUDE:   Alexandrina Agloro, assistant professor, School for the Future of Innovation in Society, Arizona State University   Taifha Natalee Alexander, director of the CRT Forward Project and law professor, UCLA Law School   Jorge Burmicky, assistant professor of higher education leadership and policy studies, Howard University   Luis A. Leyva, associate professor of mathematics education and STEM higher education, Vanderbilt University   Brendan Skip Mark, assistant professor of political science and director of the Center for Nonviolence & Peace Studies, University of Rhode Island   Renae Danielle Mayes, associate professor, Department of Disability & Psychoeducational Studies, University of Arizona   Albee Mendoza, assistant professor of psychology, Delaware State University   Dahlia Roberts Nduom, assistant professor, College of Engineering and Architecture, Howard University   Melva Treviño Peña, assistant professor of sustainable agriculture and food systems, University of Rhode Island   Terah J. Stewart, assistant professor of education, Iowa State University   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation OTHER RESOURCES: Emerging Scholars Express Hope, Validation, and Drive During Webinar | Diverse: Issues In Higher Education (diverseeducation.com) FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: X (formerly Twitter): http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Closed captioning and live show transcription are available in the video for this episode. In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at Instapodcasts.com).
57:38 1/25/24
EP127: The Antiracist School Leader, with Dr. Daman Harris
Meet Dr. Daman Harris, cofounder and codirector of the Building Our Network of Diversity (BOND) Project, a nonprofit organization that supports the recruitment, development, retention, and empowerment of male educators of color. He is the manager of the Professional Development Schools Program and the Institutions of Higher Education Partnerships for Anne Arundel County Public Schools in Maryland. He also serves as an adjunct professor at McDaniel College and a member of the graduate faculty for the University of Maryland at College Park.   In this episode, Harris joins Diverse to speak about his new book, The Antiracist School Leader — What to Know, Say, and Do.   Tune in as Harris and host David Pluviose discuss anti-racist education, addressing systemic inequalities, and the intrinsic value of diversity in professional learning activities. Harris also shares insight into his educational journey and the factors that propelled him into the realm of education. This thought-provoking discourse extends to confronting white supremacist culture and the impact of socialization into racial categories, unraveling the layers of unconscious biases and discrimination.   So, don't miss this episode as Harris and Pluviose navigate key issues shaping the landscape of education and equity today.   KEY POINTS: - Harris' educational background and factors that led him to be an educator - On anti-racist education and addressing systemic inequality - The importance of professional learning activities and the value of diversity - On dealing with white supremacist culture, unconscious biases, and discrimination - A glimpse of his book, The Antiracist School Leader—What to Know, Say, and Do - Paul Gorski’s emphasis on the importance of addressing equity detours in education - The pivotal role of actively working toward equity   QUOTABLES:   "Black is a race, not a culture. But what we are socialized to believe is that's the case. And so, there's a lack of trust there." – Dr. Daman Harris   “My book definitely weaves my professional experience and features some other folks — highlighting their professional experiences with this work and elevating their really strong aspects of it, but also recognizing the struggles that folks have with this.” – Dr. Daman Harris GUEST RESOURCES:   Dr. Daman Harris  The Antiracist School Leader—What to Know, Say, and Do  The Building Our Network of Diversity (BOND) Project   FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: X (formerly Twitter): http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation    Closed captioning and live show transcription are available in the video for this episode.   In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at Instapodcasts.com).
46:18 12/28/23
EP126: Diverse Organizational Impact and Transformation (DOIT) Leaders Discuss Critical Need to Track Your Progress in Today’s Climate
In this episode, we sit with leaders behind the Diverse Organizational Impact and Transformation certification program, DOIT.   Tune in as Dr. Ken D. Coopwood, CEO of Coopwood Diversity Leadership & Education Universal (Coop Di Leu), and Dr. William B. Harvey, a distinguished scholar at the American Association for Access, Equity, and Diversity in Washington, D.C., join host Ralph Newell to discuss the significance of accountability in higher education institutions, provide insights on the DOIT Certification, and explain the pivotal role institutions of higher learning play in a democratic society.   Coopwood and Harvey break down DOIT’s four pillars for institutional transformation (from representational diversity to campus climate), debate views on critical race theory, and share helpful advice to help leaders address issues in diversity, equity, and inclusion in higher education. Do not miss out on this episode as our guests spotlight the critical need to track diversity progress in today’s climate.   KEY POINTS: On the importance of accountability in higher education institutions Coopwood’s insights on the DOIT Certification What are the four (4) institutional pillars for transformation? The vital role of institutions of higher learning in a democratic society Critical race theory and its misrepresentation in institutions SCOTUS decision, and how can institutions achieve diversity? The pivotal role of transformational leadership to better support students On addressing diversity, equity, and inclusion in higher education What are the necessary steps for the DOIT certification?   QUOTABLES: “These institutions – public or private, large or small, irrespective of location, irrespective of their fundamental [and] foundational aspects – they exist to make the society better.” —  Dr. William B. Harvey   “We need institutional leaders to be futuristic, and their approach [to] science education, now more than ever — because without that, you're not going to ask the right questions, you're not going to address the historical illusion, and you're not going to be equipped to write a new narrative. And those things are the premises.” – Dr. Ken D. Coopwood ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:   Diverse Organizational Impact and Transformation Certification | Diverse: Issues In Higher Education (diverseeducation.com)   FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA:   X (formerly Twitter): http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation   Closed captioning and live show transcription are available in the video for this episode.  
51:38 12/14/23
EP125: One-on-One with Black Trauma Surgeon and Author Dr. Brian H. Williams on Racism, Violence, Healing, and his Run for Congress
Meet Dr. Brian H. Williams, a distinguished trauma surgeon and author of The Bodies Keep Coming: Dispatches from a Black Trauma Surgeon on Racism, Violence, and How We Heal.   In this episode, Diverse host David Pluviose engages in a conversation with the Air Force Academy graduate and Harvard University-trained surgeon on the intersection between public policy and critical issues like structural racism, gun violence, and health equity.   Williams is a professor specializing in trauma and acute care surgery at the University of Chicago Medicine. His impactful work and insights have garnered recognition worldwide. With over two decades of expertise in treating victims of gun violence, Williams has also served as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellow at the National Academy of Medicine.   Explore Williams' remarkable journey, from the trauma bay to his current political campaign, as he passionately discusses solutions to address systemic issues, healthcare disparities, and the ongoing struggle for justice. We also dive deep into the emotional aftermath of the Dallas mass shooting, a pivotal moment that ignited Williams' commitment to broader societal healing.   So, join Pluviose and Williams in this thought-provoking discussion about transformative healing.   *As a bonus to this episode Williams has graciously offered one podcast listener a free signed copy of his book. To be eligible, let us know you have listened and share feedback @DiverseIssues on X (formerly Twitter). We want to hear from you by Dec. 31. Enjoy!   KEY POINTS:   - Williams’ reflection on how the Dallas mass shooting served as his career’s pivotal moment - The importance of having a personal healing journey - The impact of witnessing gun violence firsthand as a trauma surgeon - A glimpse into the writing process for The Bodies Keep Coming: Dispatches from a Black Trauma Surgeon on Racism, Violence, and How We Heal  - Identification of strategies to create a system change, uplift the community, and address healthcare disparities - Factors that led to Williams’ pursuing a candidacy in the Congress - How journaling can help in processing one’s emotions  - The importance of empathy and understanding in the face of tragedy - William’s advocacy for gun safety policies   QUOTABLES:   “I say this frequently. I didn't choose trauma surgery; trauma surgery chose me.” – Dr. Brian Williams   "We have a majority of Americans that want to do something to reduce needless death and suffering due to firearms." – Dr. Brian Williams   GUEST RESOURCES:   Dr. Brian Williams    Website: https://brianwilliamsmd.com/ X (formerly Twitter): @bhwilliamsmd LinkedIn: @bhwilliamsmd Instagram: @BrianHWilliamsMD   Book: The Bodies Keep Coming: Dispatches from a Black Trauma Surgeon on Racism, Violence, and How We Heal. To purchase, go to https://www.broadleafbooks.com/store/product/9781506483122/The-Bodies-Keep-Coming    OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: X (formerly Twitter): http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation  Closed captioning and live show transcription are available in the video for this episode.
32:26 11/30/23
EP124: Empowering Futures: The Impactful Initiatives of Phoenix College for Latino Students, with Dr. Kimberly Britt
Phoenix College (PC) is one of nine schools recognized with Excelencia in Education's 2023 Seal of Excelencia for its commitment to Latino student success.   In this episode, Diverse welcomes PC President Dr. Kimberly Britt. Tune in as Diverse host Ralph Newell and Britt discuss the college's commitment to Latino student success, including its various initiatives in academic and personal development.   Britt also emphasizes the importance of family involvement in supporting students, especially in underrepresented populations, and highlighted the impact of programs that go beyond traditional classroom experiences.   Join Britt as she highlights the unique approach PC takes to create an inclusive environment that ensures every student feels valued and empowered.   KEY POINTS: - Phoenix College's various programs that foster Latino students’ success - The multifaceted support system of the ACE program - How the CURE program reduces barriers in STEM education - The importance of addressing mental health challenges among students and employees - The pivotal role of involving families of Latino students in their academic journey - The significance of self-expression and cultural identity within higher education - Britt’s shift from a victim mindset to a survivor mindset    QUOTABLES: "For underrepresented populations and first-gen [students], helping the family understand the importance of education and the journey is just as important as the intentional support for the students." — Dr. Kimberly Britt   “It's important to the students, in a way, to express what's on the inside and — and heal, if necessary, but to also celebrate their heritage, [and] their communities. So, we're doing a lot of work in that space.” — Dr. Kimberly Britt GUEST RESOURCES:   Dr. Kimberly Britt   2023 Seal of Excelencia https://www.diverseeducation.com/from-the-magazine/article/15635685/2023-seal-of-excelencia Dr. Kimberly Britt Bio: Dr. Kimberly Britt | Phoenix College   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: X (formerly Twitter): http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL:   https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation   Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.
40:20 11/16/23
EP123: An Accidental Triumph: The Improbable History of American Higher Education, with Dr. Sol Gittleman
In this episode, Diverse welcomes Dr. Sol Gittleman, the renowned Alice and Nathan Gantcher University Professor Emeritus at Tufts University. Gittleman joins podcast host Dr. Jamal Watson to share his unique perspective, gained over decades, into the dynamic nature of American higher education. He and Watson delve into how the trajectory of higher education has shaped academia as well as the cultural and political fabric of the nation.   Gittleman brings forward historical context explaining the critical role higher education has played in shaping American culture, diversity, and individual freedom. As with his latest book, "An Accidental Triumph: The Improbable History of American Higher Education,” he highlights the evolution of the American higher education system, the diverse nature of colleges and universities in the U.S., and the profound impact of key events such as World War II on the development of education. Gittleman's insights challenge conventional narratives and highlight the uniqueness of collegiate America. This episode provides a richer understanding of higher education's pivotal role in shaping America's past, present, and future.   KEY POINTS: The diverse history of American higher education and its evolution from its early faith-based origins The prevalence of race-based curricula in American history teachings  Understanding the significance of World War II and the GI Bill in transforming the higher education landscape in the U.S. Challenges of managing a vast and diverse system in universities The pivotal role of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) efforts in higher education The potential for international students to study abroad in the U.S. Impacts of technology and AI on the future of education   QUOTABLES: "The mere fact that we are so diverse now —. there's going to be contention for the rest of our lives, because there'll always be somebody trying to get it back in the envelope." – Dr. Sol Gittleman “It's such a complex and different and varied American system. And the rest of the world knows that. And we don't know much about our system at all; we're interested in football and gambling." – Dr. Sol Gittleman   GUEST RESOURCES: Dr. Sol Gittleman “An Accidental Triumph: The Improbable History of American Higher Education”: Gittleman, Sol: 9781959000044: Amazon.com: Books    OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: X (formerly Twitter): http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL:  https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation  Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.
32:56 10/26/23
EP122: From Debt to Wealth: The Path Forward with Robert F. Smith’s Student Freedom Initiative
In this episode, Diverse welcomes Dr. Mark Brown, the executive director of the Student Freedom Initiative (SFI). Brown joins podcast host David Pluviose in exploring the initiative’s mission and vision for addressing the enduring challenges posed by student debt and the wealth gap in America.   Brown sheds light on the genesis of SFI at Morehouse College, initiated by philanthropist Robert F. Smith, and how it has expanded to benefit not only historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) but tribal colleges. SFI is a modern funding, transformative educational program designed to address common economic challenges and enhance information technology infrastructure. The initiative seeks to ensure perpetual support for participating schools to bridge wealth gaps and diversify talent pipelines. It offers innovative income-contingent agreements for STEM students that enable flexible income-based repayments. SFI further invests in students through grants for non-tuition-related emergencies and financial management courses.   Discover how SFI is pioneering this innovative approach to education financing with partnerships and an aim toward a groundbreaking endowment without walls. Tune into the conversation between Brown and Pluviose as they underscore the importance of expanding the initiative's reach and invite others to join in the journey.   KEY POINTS: - Understanding SFI's vision to bridge the wealth gap through education - Empowering students with alternatives such as income-contingent agreements and parent-plus loans - Financial literacy for college students, parents, and underrepresented groups - HBCU partnerships that create job opportunities and certifications - The ultimate goal, achieving a $500 million endowment without walls by 2028 - Why join the movement for economic empowerment   QUOTABLES: "Our focus of all those things, and where they weave together, is the wealth gap in America through the lens of education." – Dr. Mark Brown “By the year 2028, we need a $500 million endowment without walls for all of our participating schools. It needs to be unique in this way. Some of the resources that are in that $500 million are philanthropic for sure.” – Dr. Mark Brown   GUEST RESOURCES: Student Freedom Initiative Partners with New Investment Fund to Raise the Capital of HBCUs. The historic fund launches a $10.35M growth fund for participating HBCUs. Read the full article: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20230606005191/en/Student-Freedom-Initiative-Partners-With-New-Investment-Fund-to-Raise-the-Capital-of-HBCUs Check out the Student Freedom Initiative website, here.   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here. WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation
27:58 10/12/23
EP121: Transforming Academia for Equity, with Dr. Alonzo Plough and Dr. Thomas LaVeist
In this episode, Diverse host David Pluviose welcomes two distinguished guests, Dr. Alonzo Plough and Dr. Thomas LaVeist. Plough is vice president of Research-Evaluation-Learning and chief science officer for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. LaVeist is dean of the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at Tulane University and chair-elect of the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH).   Plough and LaVeist share the challenges universities face, particularly in their efforts to foster diversity and inclusion. They discuss the impact of COVID-19 on health disparities and the valuable lessons learned from the pandemic. LaVeist stresses the influence of social factors and racial segregation on health inequalities, while Plough highlights the importance of addressing inequity in public health practice and academia. They also explore their involvement in the recently established program, Transforming Academia for Equity, and shed light on large-scale initiatives, such as those led by ASPPH, that aim to transform institutions.   This episode serves as a call to action, urging institutions to engage with these programs and initiatives to contribute to the vital work of closing health equity gaps. So, join the conversation and find out how academia can better serve marginalized communities and tackle health disparities effectively.   KEY POINTS: - Dr. Thomas LaVeist’s transition to health inequity research - Dr. Plough’s activist roots and journey to public health - Social factors and the role of racial segregation in COVID-19 disparities - Uncovering weaknesses in the U.S. public health system during the pandemic - The importance of fostering dynamic community partnerships in schools of public health - The necessity of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion cultural competency and improving the workforce - Transforming academia with an equity program and how it can help address inequalities - The importance of diverse leadership in academia - Developing the next generation of equity-focused leaders QUOTABLES: "The social factors, political issues, economic issues, can be as important as biological issues in determining the health of populations." - Dr. Thomas LaVeist "The COVID-19 outbreak continues to be something that amplifies marginality and unfair health outcomes, and it should’ve been more than a teaching moment."- Dr. Alonzo Plough   GUEST RESOURCES: Learn about Dr. Thomas LaVeist at https://sph.tulane.edu/hpm/thomas-laveist-phd and Dr. Alonzo Plough at https://www.rwjf.org/en/about-rwjf/staff-and-trustees/staff/p/alonzo-l-plough.html   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please, drop us a line using the form here.
38:22 9/28/23
EP120: Dear Department Chair, Letters from Black Women Leaders to the Next Generation, with Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans
In this episode, Diverse host Dr. Jamal Watson engages in a thought-provoking discussion with Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans, a distinguished professor at Georgia State University's Institute for Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, who draws upon her extensive experience as a former department chair from 2010 to 2022.   Evans recently edited a book with Drs. Stephanie Shonekan and Stephanie G. Adams, "Dear Department Chair: Letters from Black Women Leaders to the Next Generation.” Evans sheds light on the book’s compelling themes in this interview. She speaks on the importance of documenting personal journeys and experiences, emphasizing the critical role of self-care in leadership positions, and challenging established paradigms of leadership. The dialogue also explores fresh perspectives on leadership within the academic sphere and underscores the transformative influence of mentorship on the journey to success, particularly for aspiring Black women leaders. Tune into this enlightening exchange, as Watson and Evans light the way for a future of empowered Black women leaders.   KEY POINTS: - Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans' Remarkable Path to Higher Education - The motivating force behind Dear Department Chair and its influential reach - How Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans navigated the multifaceted role of Department Chair - Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans’ transition from intellectual history to mental health - The power of mentorship and peer networks - The significance of mentorship and peer networks - How Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans and her co-editors advocate for the next generation of Black Women Leaders   QUOTABLES: "This book is an outgrowth of my experience as a department chair. We must keep a record of our personal experiences, but also give context to those experiences." - Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans "If you don't take care of yourself, there's no way that you can have any sort of clarity to be a leader. You have to respect the autonomy of others. If you're going to say no and you're going to set boundaries, you also have to accept that other people are going to say no. You have to have certain types of understandings of what it means to be a human being in this position." - Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans   GUEST RESOURCES: Dr. Stephanie Evans’ new book: https://www.wsupress.wayne.edu/books/detail/dear-department-chair   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.
35:21 9/14/23
EP119: Meet ‘#MamaScientist’ Dr. Jessica DeHart
Diverse host David Pluviose welcomes special guest Dr. Jessica DeHart, associate professor in the School for Community and Global Health at Claremont Graduate University in California. DeHart, a self-described “mama scientist,” founded the nonprofit Living Your Truth Empowered, whose mission is to improve the wellbeing and quality of life for cancer survivors. The organization helps to provide after-treatment when cancer survivors are in remission.   In this episode, DeHart discusses the formation of her organization and the driving forces compelling her focus on cancer survivorship work. She shares the story of her personal trajectory through higher education, motherhood, and why it is critical for women in STEAM/STEM, academia, and the C-suite to understand that, through hard work and prioritization, they can excel in both their careers and family life. Tune in as DeHart and Pluviose share this fascinating discussion.   KEY POINTS: DeHart’s journey into higher education  DeHart’s decision to help cancer survivors The importance of doing scientific research in diverse communities How DeHart transitions scholarship to advocacy work at CGU How #mamascientist works to encourage women to pursue STEAM/STEM careers   QUOTABLES: “Everything has been driven by passion, but not just that, [it’s] almost a serendipitous journey. I'm adopted because my mom had ovarian cancer when she was young. My parents couldn't have children. So right off the bat, cancer kind of started my journey.” – Dr. Jessica DeHart “The second reason I wanted to go to CGU is to teach and to show other women in science that you can do it. You can be a mom, and you can be a scientist at the same time.” – Dr. Jessica DeHart   GUEST RESOURCES: Jessica DeHart Supports Cancer Survivors and Mama Scientists: https://www.cgu.edu/news/2023/05/jessica-dehart-supports-cancer-survivors-and-mama-scientists/    OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.
32:48 8/24/23
EP118: Two College Presidents Share Stories from South LA
Don’t miss this captivating discussion between two Black Los Angeles-area college presidents who shared their journey from South L.A. to the presidential suite in commemoration of Juneteenth.   Dr. Anthony Culpepper, president of Los Angeles Southwest College, joined Robert Brown, Esq., president of the University of West Los Angeles, for a special chat about their life paths and the impact education had on their success.   As two Black children who led parallel lives a generation apart, the presidents discussed pivotal moments in their young lives growing up in South Los Angeles that led to their decisions to seek more than what the streets offered.   They connect on their recognition of the fragility of life, their responsibilities as role models, and their humility through success. Their raw discussion acknowledges their paths are not special, and in fact, they are fortunate their decisions led them to success — decisions they hope to pass on to new generations.   QUOTABLES “The ghetto is not a territory, it’s a mindset. Juneteenth for me is a day to reflect on overcoming the mindset of being imprisoned, oppressed and impoverished.” - Robert Brown, Esq. “I’m hoping that we get to the point where we’re not dependent on a holiday to know that we’re free. Freedom is a frame of mind and if I’m free in my mind, you can never cage me.” - Dr. Anthony Culpepper   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL:  https://www.youtube.com/@DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.       In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
59:50 6/22/23
EP117: The Model Minority Myth with Dr. Sumun L. Pendakur
In this episode, Diverse host Ralph Newell sits down with noted DEI expert and strategist Dr. Sumun L. Pendakur.   Named one of the top 35 women in higher education by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education magazine, Pendakur speaks to the racist framing behind the label “model minority,” the chilling and silencing effects of red state legislation, and why protesting affirmative action is opposition to the promise of education.   KEY POINTS: Why the “model minority” label is so problematic How the model minority myth masks the experiences of Asian American students Challenges facing undocumented Asian students The importance of targeted spaces and cultural centers Is anti-affirmative action really just anti-racial justice? Racial battle fatigue on the already marginalized Unseen DEI barriers in higher education   QUOTABLES: “The model minority naming is designed to create division. It’s designed as part of a design, divide, and conquer strategy.” - Dr. Sumun L. Pendakur “There's no good stereotype, because it creates a narrowing of possibility.” - Dr. Sumun L. Pendakur   GUEST RESOURCES: About Dr. Sumun L. Pendakur: http://www.sumunpendakur.com/about   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.       In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
64:27 6/15/23
EP116: Meet Dr. David K. Wilson, President, Morgan State University — a DOIT certified institution
The last in a series of conversations with Diverse Organizational Impact and Transformation (DOIT)-certified school presidents, this episode features Dr. David K. Wilson, president of Morgan State University.   Tune in as Wilson speaks with Diverse host Ralph Newell about the times in which we live, where in so many corners of our nation, institutions are trying to wipe the challenges of underrepresented peoples from the history books and pretend those challenges do not exist or do not matter. Wilson urges students to grasp, to own, and to make this period of resistance their era to challenge what he calls the “nonsense” of today.   Along with his take on the attacks against DEI and his mission to create a living laboratory for diversity at Morgan, learn more about Wilson himself, including his upbringing in rural Alabama and what’s on the menu at the next family reunion.   KEY POINTS: · A look into Wilson’s childhood in rural Alabama · The history of innovation and creativity in the Black community · How Wilson’s student experience impacts his work today · Why becoming a Research 1 institution is important for Morgan · Creating a living laboratory for diversity on campus · Effects of the constant attack on DEI in education   QUOTABLES: “You take what you have and make what you need. A phrase right now that is deeply rooted in the Black community.”   - Dr. David K. Wilson “Talking about loving students, well, it's a different kind of love. It’s loving the potential. It’s understanding the potential. It’s putting students in a position where they come face to face with potential, and then they marry it.” - Dr. David K. Wilson   GUEST RESOURCES: About the Diverse Organizational Impact and Transformation Certification: diverseeducation.com/page/DOIT Eye to the Future: Morgan State University earns DOIT certification: diverseeducation.com/page/Morgan-State-University President Wilson’s bio: Biography (morgan.edu)   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: youtube.com/user/Diversediversedivers   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.       In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
54:48 5/25/23
EP115: Meet David T. Hayes, President, Coe College — a DOIT Certified Institution
In this second in a series of conversations with DOIT certified school presidents, Diverse host Ralph Newell welcomes Dr. David T. Hayes, president of Coe College.   Tune in as Hayes speaks to building a safe space for open and honest conversations at Coe, one of only three schools to receive the inaugural DOIT (Diverse Organizational Impact and Transformation) certification. He will discuss the role of small liberal arts colleges in preparing students to be citizens in a participatory democracy.   The talk is not all business though. We also learn what is on Hayes’s bucket list, his love for Star Wars, and why there is no such thing as too much coffee.   KEY POINTS: · Dr. Hayes revolving journey to Coe College · Why Dr. Hayes continues the challenging work of DEI · Examining the decision to expand the role of diversity officer · How Coe College measures progress and initiatives · Building spaces for open and honest conversations · Anti-DEI legislation and its effect on higher education institutions   QUOTABLES: “When else would you rather be trying to put your shoulder into an institution to move it forward and keep it healthy and vibrant than at a time of challenge and with the disruption of the last several years.” - Dr. David T. Hayes “Coe was such a great experience for me as an undergrad. I have a lot of loyalty to Coe, and I literally want every student, faculty, staff, community member, and alum to have that same feeling of gratitude toward the college because they feel like the college added value to their lives.” - Dr. David T. Hayes   GUEST RESOURCES: About the Diverse Organizational Impact and Transformation Certification: diverseeducation.com/page/DOIT Coe College Open to Change Open to Change | Diverse: Issues In Higher Education (diverseeducation.com)  President’s welcome and bio: coe.edu/why-coe/discover-coe/presidents-welcome   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: youtube.com/user/Diversediversedivers   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.       In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
49:22 5/18/23
EP114: Fundamental Lessons for Black Faculty and Student Success with Dr. Thomas A. Parham
Dr. Thomas A. Parham, president of California State University, Dominguez Hills (CSUDH), shares what he believes are the fundamental ingredients for success for Black faculty and students in the 114th episode of In The Margins.   In this episode, Diverse host David Pluviose welcomes Parham, who speaks to his own journey to university president and the implicit bias he has encountered in higher education.   Be sure not to miss this conversation on what Parham calls the stones of stagnation and rocks of resignation that keep higher education from being the diverse, inclusive, and socially minded institutions they say they want to be, and hear how he plans to close the gap between the aspirational and the actual.   KEY POINTS: - Parham’s journey to CSU, Dominguez Hills - Fundamental lessons for Black faculty success - The importance of defining and re-framing the narrative - Mental health when it comes to Black students - The impact of the pandemic on diverse students - Current and future initiatives to promote Black excellence at CSUDH   QUOTABLES: “Never seek validation from your oppressor. So, the problem was never that people have a negative opinion about Black folk or women or LGBT, or whatever it is. The problem is you give a darn about what they think in the first place.” “Recognize that this individual, who I consider to be a seed of divinely inspired possibility, if we can nurture that individual in its proper context, they'll grow into the fullest expression of all they're supposed to become. So, our campuses, my campus, is a soil.” “Crisis does three things. It reveals character. It exposes weakness. But it also creates opportunity.”   GUEST RESOURCES: Dr. Thomas A. Parham: President's Bio (csudh.edu)   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.       In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
49:09 5/11/23
EP113: Shifting Cultural Perspectives on Education with Dr. Kimberly Greene
Tune in as Dr. Kimberly Greene goes beyond preconceived notions of what it means to be a teacher and shares her vision of an education that is synonymous with exploration and innovation while acknowledging there is more than one way to learn.   In this episode, Diverse host David Pluviose talks EdTech with Greene, professor of education and chair of the Master of Arts in Education Program at the University of Massachusetts Global School of Education.   Greene speaks to the ways EdTech can progress in terms of diversity in the classroom and urges listeners to recognize that education is in a new day. She says it is time to stop dehumanizing a profession that is all about building relationships to gain trust and empower people to take chances, grow, and bloom.   KEY POINTS: - Dr. Kimberly Greene’s accidental path to education - Why is teacher diversity still a problem today? - Changing cultural perspectives on learning and education - The over-politicization of education - EdTech’s role in advancing diversity in the classroom   QUOTABLES: “One of the things that can truly hold us back is our experience. That we're not able to step back and recognize just because it's what we lived at the time, doesn't mean that it was either the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, or the way things need to be going forward.” - Dr. Kimberly Greene “We can't assembly line education.” - Dr. Kimberly Greene   GUEST RESOURCES: Dr. Kimberly Greene: umassglobal.edu/about-umassglobal/our-people/kimberly-greene-edd   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.       In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
41:57 4/27/23
EP112: Meet Dr. Philomena Mantella, President, Grand Valley State University—a DOIT certified institution
Grand Valley State University is among the first cohort of institutions to be granted the coveted DOIT (Diverse Organizational Impact and Transformation) Certification. So, in this episode, Diverse host Ralph Newell sits down with the institution's president, Dr. Philomena Mantella, to discuss the recognition and Mantella’s mission to improve the social mobility of young adults through education.   Don’t miss this conversation focused on action, improved pathways to education, working alongside the community, and setting the tone in DEI work in higher education with Mantella.     KEY POINTS: Receiving the Diverse Organizational Impact and Transformation (DOIT) Certification The most challenging work behind the DOIT certification process What is REP4 and how can people get involved? Why is Dr. Philomena Mantella so passionate about first-generation students? Navigating recent attacks on DEI initiatives How business and industry can be key allies to DEI education   QUOTABLES: “The opportunities we have with diverse students or students that have been underserved or underrepresented in higher education is to give them that sense of possibility that perhaps they haven't contemplated before.” “I get really frustrated when I hear people say things like, ‘we don't have enough talent.’ Because we are leaving so many people out of the knowledge economy or not relating to other educational pathways more seamlessly, creating these ceilings.” “We see the promise of individuals of all backgrounds, but we understand that those structures of systemic inequity are really inhibiting the equality of opportunity.”   GUEST RESOURCES: About the Diverse Organizational Impact and Transformation Certification diverseeducation.com/page/DOIT Setting the Tone in DEI, Accessibility Work diverseeducation.com/from-the-magazine/article/15306543/attention-to-details   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.
47:00 4/13/23
EP111: Meet Dr. Steven R. Gonzales, Recipient of the 2023 Diverse Champions Award
On April 2, Dr. Steven Gonzales was presented with the 2023 Diverse Champions Award at the annual meeting of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) in Denver, Colorado.   In this episode, Gonzales, now chancellor of the Maricopa County Community College District, sits down with Diverse host David Pluviose to share his journey through higher education, a story of championing diversity through challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic.   Tune in to learn more about this year’s Diverse Champion’s work to foster an environment of diversity, equity, and inclusion, and his advice to leaders tracking their own paths to make a difference against headwinds.   KEY POINTS: - The significance of being named 2023 Diverse Champion - Dr. Steven R. Gonzales’ journey to higher education - The perspective of a first-generation student - What does a diverse climate do for community colleges? - Challenges of leading through the pandemic as interim chancellor - Advice for leaders struggling to make a difference   QUOTABLES: “I just found myself in positions of wanting to expand my reach of the types of decisions that I think I could make, that could impact students that I was hoping to impact.” “While there's a difference in age, I can relate to some of those fears and unknowns as a first-generation student. When you just don't know, what you don't know.”   GUEST RESOURCES: Dr. Steven R. Gonzalez to receive the 2022 Diverse Champions Award — read the article here:  lsc-pagepro.mydigitalpublication.com/publication/?i=786822&utm_campaign=&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.         In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
39:43 4/6/23
EP110: Broward College Swaps the Courtroom with the Classroom
In this episode, Diverse host David Pluviose sits down with Broward College president, Gregory Haile to discuss several initiatives he is spearheading to give students caught up in the justice system a second chance at higher education.   Tune in as Haile, a former practicing attorney, shares his mission to uplift the lives of others through his Court to College Diversion Program as well as the Corrections to College Program created specifically for women.   Participants not only take responsibility for the challenges of an individual but become difference makers to those who desire to live their lives through higher education and transform their futures.   KEY POINTS: - What led Haile to this specific work within the education system? - Benefits of post-secondary opportunities in higher education - The birth of the Court to College Diversion Program - “Simple and Deliberate” advice from President Gregory Haile   QUOTABLES: “People do make mistakes. And those people that make those mistakes should be given an opportunity to transform their lives, particularly when doing so could make a difference not only for themselves but for their families, their communities, and of course, enhance the lives of all of those around them.”   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.       In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
22:03 3/30/23
EP109: Understanding the Black Student Experience with Courtney Brown
In this episode, Diverse host Ralph Newell takes a journey into the Black student experience in higher education with Dr. Courtney Brown, vice president of impact and planning for the Lumina Foundation.   Newell and Brown discuss how to ensure that all Americans, especially Black, Latino, Hispanic, and Native Americans, have access and opportunity to succeed in education beyond high school. Tune in as Brown discusses the importance of understanding the truth behind the Black student experience and the discrimination endured by students of color.   From the barriers Black students face in enrollment and retention to why higher education is not designed to support today’s nontraditional students, Brown examines challenges in DEI and higher education and how we can respond.   KEY POINTS: - The Lumina Foundation and the impetus behind their goals? - Why is diversity in education so important? - A demographic look into enrollment and retainment issues pre- and post-pandemic - What barriers do Black students face in higher education?   QUOTABLES: “We can't hide from these numbers. These are real numbers. These are how people are feeling and these feelings are making them not be able to stay enrolled in their schools. And so, we have to do something to act, to change the trajectory for these students and millions like them.”   GUEST RESOURCES: Our (Diverse) story: Study: Black Students Have Lower Completion Rates Than Other Racial/Ethnic Groups | Diverse: Issues In Higher Education (diverseeducation.com)   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education       Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.
45:50 3/23/23
EP108: Transforming the Future of Health Education: Centering Race and Medical Humanities with Dr. M. Gabriela Torres
Dr. M. Gabriela Torres, professor, chair, and associate provost at Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts, is a cultural anthropologist who teaches courses in Medical Anthropology, Global Health, Violence Against Women and Latin America and Latinx Studies.   Tune in as Torres and Diverse host David Pluviose discuss the future of health education and how she and her colleagues are launching a new series of faculty collaborations aimed at transforming health education at Wheaton and beyond.   The three-year project will expand the curriculum with new courses and teaching materials. It is expected to create new Liberal Education and Professional Success (LEAPS) and sophomore experiences and equips students entering health and medical fields to better serve diverse and underserved populations.   This is an episode you don’t want to miss.   QUOTABLES: “History is humanities. And so, that’s why I think thinking about race from an historical perspective and thinking about race in medicine from an historical perspective is really important.”   “Medicine is not neutral. It’s part of power structures that exist.”   “I understood that even if Latinos weren't constituted as a racial group, there were still health consequences that came from our ethnic identification. So that, in and of itself, made me really spend some time in my courses teaching about race and questioning it.”     GUEST RESOURCES: Dr. M. Gabriela Torres: https://wheatoncollege.edu/academics/faculty-directory/m-gabriela-torres/   WATCH THIS VIDEO AND OTHERS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/user/Diversediversedivers   OR FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: http://twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: http://instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: http://facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education   Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line using the form found here.
35:38 3/9/23
EP107: Pursuing Research Excellence: Dr. Lesia L. Crumpton-Young's Vision for HBCUs in STEM
In this episode, Diverse host David Pluviose sits down with Dr. Lesia L. Crumpton-Young, the president of Texas Southern University and one of Diverse’s 2023 top 25 leading women to be recognized during Women’s History Month.   Tune in as Crumpton-Young speaks to her storied journey through higher education, from being the first African American woman to earn a doctorate from Texas A&M University College of Engineering to answering the call to help transform lives in higher education.   Crumpton-Young also discusses her comprehensive, multi-faceted approach to getting underrepresented students successfully through post-secondary education, promoting and supporting diverse students in STEM fields, and competing for Research-1 status at HBCUs.   KEY POINTS: - Dr. Lesia L. Crumpton-Young’s journey through higher education - How to boost the number of minorities achieving STEM doctorates - What is the role of HBCUs in preparing students for STEM field careers? - The potential impact of HBCUs reaching Research-1 classification - Texas Southern University’s growth initiatives for the future   QUOTABLES: “I believe being a president in higher education is all about transforming the lives of others.”   “It's clear that without HBCUs, there would be no diverse STEM workforce.”   “We need our HBCUs and our Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs). We need them to be engaged in research because they will produce good solutions to many of the grand challenges that are plaguing our nation.”   GUEST RESOURCES: President’s bio: tsu.edu/about/office-of-the-president/presidents-bio.html Texas Southern University to Launch College for People to Finish Incomplete Degree Programs | Diverse: Issues In Higher Education (diverseeducation.com)   PRODUCTS / RESOURCES: Watch this video and others on our YouTube channel: youtube.com/user/Diversediversedivers Visit the Diverse: Issues In Higher Education website: diverseeducation.com Or follow us on social media: Twitter: twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line here.   In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
34:16 2/23/23
EP106: Reducing Mental Health Stigma — “You Are Enough” with Dr. Lawrence Chatters
In this episode, Diverse host Ralph Newell sits down with Dr. Lawrence Chatters, executive associate athletic director for Strategic Initiatives at the University of Nebraska Lincoln.   Lean in as Chatters discusses reducing the stigma around mental health and his unconventional ways of getting diverse students to support groups, providing them with a comfortable space to recognize other people who are having the same challenges while validating their experience and acknowledging that “they are enough.”   Born with albinism and legally blind, Chatters shares his journey to higher education and how he translates his unique worldview in his work with student-athletes from various backgrounds and their mental health.   KEY POINTS: - Dr. Lawrence Chatters’ journey in education and psychology - Why has mental health been hidden for so long? - Connecting student-athletes with mental health services - Unique challenges facing student-athletes today - How Dr. Chatters ties together psychology, athletics, and DEI - The silver lining of the pandemic and mental health   QUOTABLES: “You are enough. You have the capability to get yourself through these challenging times. You have the will, the confidence, and the self-esteem. It's all in there. You may just have to discover it.” “Going to get help doesn't actually make you weak. It actually makes you better.”   GUEST RESOURCES: Dr. Lawrence Chatters: huskers.com/staff-directory/dr-lawrence-chatters/1032 “You Are Enough” originally appeared in the January 19, 2023 edition of Diverse magazine.   PRODUCTS / RESOURCES: Watch this video and others on our YouTube channel: youtube.com/user/Diversediversedivers Visit the Diverse: Issues In Higher Education website: diverseeducation.com Or follow us on social media: Twitter: twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line here.         In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
50:57 2/16/23
EP105: ‘The Challenge is Great but the Opportunity is Greater‘ with Dr. Larry D. Johnson, Jr.
In this episode, Diverse host David Pluviose sits down with Dr. Larry D. Johnson Jr. as he completes his first year as president of Guttman Community College, which is also celebrating its 10th anniversary.   Tune in as Johnson speaks about reimagining what community college could be and his vision for continuing a research-based, innovative model focused on moving students efficiently toward graduation and supporting diverse students in a truly equitable way.   Don’t miss this conversation on the City University of New York's first new community college in more than 40 years and Johnson’s seat at the table as the voice for the voiceless. It is a true lesson in “flying the plane while building it.”   KEY POINTS: - Dr. Larry D. Johnson Jr.’s journey to higher education - Leading Guttman through the pandemic - The unique challenges serving students in New York City - How to promote the value proposition of a community college - High-impact practices and future initiatives at Guttman Community College   QUOTABLES: “We needed people at the table who would advocate for what I oftentimes will say ‘the least of these.’" “I believe that community colleges are a place where we can certainly meet the moment and be able to show that we are viable and we are producing graduates that will really make a contribution and an economic impact in our communities.”   GUEST RESOURCES: Dr. Larry D. Johnson Jr., Guttman Community College president: guttman.cuny.edu/about/office-of-the-president   PRODUCTS / RESOURCES: Watch this video and others on our YouTube channel: youtube.com/user/Diversediversedivers Visit the Diverse: Issues In Higher Education website: diverseeducation.com Or follow us on social media: Twitter: twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line here.         In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
41:31 2/9/23
EP104: Career Challenges: Straight Talk about Achieving Success in the Technology-Driven, Post-COVID World of Work with Dr. Frank Burtnet
In this episode, Diverse host Ralph Newell sits down with veteran counselor and counselor educator Dr. Frank Burtnett to discuss his latest book Career Challenges: Straight Talk about Achieving Success in the Technology-Driven, Post-COVID World of Work (Third Edition).   Tune in as Burtnett examines the career development encounters people experience across their work lifespan, the eight phases for career success, and the challenges one must confront and resolve as they navigate this process.   Learn how Career Challenges is the next best thing to having a professional career counselor in the room and about its value to not only the career-minded individual but to counselors, staffing professionals, educators, and more.   KEY POINTS: - The inspiration behind Dr. Burtnett’s Career Challenges book - How do we prepare young people for the career development process? - What are the eight phases for career success and satisfaction? - Why decision-making is an essential skill for all life experiences - The workplace is changing, and we must change with it - Maximizing life-work-balance in today’s more flexible workplace   QUOTABLES: “I didn't know this at the beginning of my education career, but I think I learned it along the way, and it's more pronounced today than ever, it is that we don't do enough life skills education.”   “Along came this thing called lifelong learning. No one who prepared 20, 40, or 60 years ago is prepared for today's world of work. Technology has screwed all that up.”   “If you don't know where you're going, you will probably end up someplace else. And I think somewhere in this world up here we have to have a goal. We have to have a plan to reach that goal.”   GUEST RESOURCES: Career Challenges: Straight Talk about Achieving Success in the Technology-Driven World (Third Edition): rowman.com/ISBN/9781475868074/Career-Challenges-Straight-Talk-about-Achieving-Success-in-the-Technology-Driven-Post-COVID-World-of-Work-3rd-Edition Use PROMO Code: RLEGEN20 for a special discount! Dr. Frank Burtnett: marymount.edu/staff-members/frank-burtnett   PRODUCTS / RESOURCES: Watch this video and others on our YouTube channel: youtube.com/user/Diversediversedivers Visit the Diverse: Issues In Higher Education website: diverseeducation.com Or follow us on social media: Twitter: twitter.com/diverseissues Instagram: instagram.com/diverseissuesinhighereducation Facebook: facebook.com/DiverseIssuesInHigherEducation/ Linkedin: linkedin.com/company/diverse-issues-in-higher-education Transcription services are available upon request. Please drop us a line here.         In The Margins is produced by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education and edited by Instapodcasts (visit at instapodcasts.com)
40:28 1/26/23