Show cover of Living God's Way with Scott LaPierre

Living God's Way with Scott LaPierre

Scott LaPierre (https://www.scottlapierre.org/) is a senior pastor, author, and conference speaker. This podcast includes his conference messages, guest preaching, and expository sermons at Woodland Christian Church. Each of Scott’s messages is the result of hours of studying the Bible. Scott and his wife, Katie, grew up together in northern California, and God has blessed them with eight children. View all of Pastor Scott’s books on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Scott-LaPierre/e/B01JT920EQ. Receive a FREE copy of Scott’s book, “Seven Biblical Insights for Healthy, Joyful, Christ-Centered Marriages.” For Scott LaPierre’s conference and speaking information, including testimonies, and endorsements, please visit: https://www.scottlapierre.org/conferences-and-speaking/. Feel free to contact Scott at: https://www.scottlapierre.org/contact/.

Tracks

Something Greater than Solomon | Jesus Brought the Kingdom of God
Jesus said, "The queen of the South…came from the ends of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon, and behold, something greater than Solomon is here" (Matthew 12:42). This verse isn't worded the way we’d expect! Wouldn’t we expect Jesus to say, "…someone wiser is here"? Why did He say something? He said something because He’s referring to more than just Himself. He’s also referring to the kingdom He brought with Him. God become a Man in the Person of Jesus Christ. He came from heaven to earth. He brought the kingdom with Him. He was near the people: they could see Him, hear Him, and even touch Him…which is why they said the kingdom is “NEAR or “AT HAND.” The rest of the sermon focuses on this kingdom, and how it’s greater than Solomon’s kingdom. https://youtu.be/DBnjh8wo_hM Jesus said, "The queen of the South…came to hear the wisdom of Solomon, and behold, something greater than Solomon is here" (Matthew 12:42). Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Something Greater than Solomon Is HereFamily Worship Guide for Something Greater than Solomon Is HereSermon Notes for Something Greater than Solomon Is HereLesson one: Jesus brought the kingdom of God with him.Lesson two: Solomon prefigures the glory of Christ’s future kingdom.Lesson three: Jesus is greater than Solomon in (part one) his knowledge of people.Lesson three: Jesus is greater than Solomon in (part two) the supper he prepares.Lesson three: Jesus is greater than Solomon in (part three) his servants’ joy.Lesson three: Jesus is greater than Solomon in (part four) his execution of justice. Sermon Lessons for Something Greater than Solomon Is Here Lesson 1: __________ ______________ the kingdom of God with him (2 Samuel 7:16 cf. Luke 1:30-33, Matthew 3:22, 4:17, 10:7, Luke 10:9-11).Lesson 2: ______________ ____________________ the glory of Christ’s future kingdom (Matthew 12:42, John 5:39).Lesson 3: Jesus is greater than Solomon in:(Part 1) his knowledge ____ ___________ (1 Kings 10:1-3 cf. John 2:24, Hebrews 4:13).(Part 2) _______ ____________ he prepares (1 Kings 10:4-5 cf. Revelation 19:9).(Part 3) his _________________ ______(1 Kings 10:6-8 cf. Genesis 2:15, 3:17-19, Revelation 22:3).(Part 4) his __________________ ____ justice (1 Kings 10:9, 3:28 cf. Isaiah 11:3-4). Family Worship Guide for Something Greater than Solomon Is Here Day 1: Read 2 Samuel 7:16 cf. Luke 1:30-33, Matthew 3:22, 4:17, 10:7, Luke 10:9-11 and discuss: when did it look like the Davidic Covenant was unfulfilled? When was the Davidic covenant fulfilled? Describe the kingdom Jesus brought with him. What did the gospel sound like before Jesus’s death? What does the gospel sound like after Jesus’s death? Or another way to ask: what did the gospel sound like in the Gospels, and then what did it sound like in Acts and the epistles?Day 2: Read Matthew 12:42, John 5:39 and discuss: what mistake did the religious leaders make with the Scriptures in Jesus’s day? How can we avoid making the same mistake? What are some of your favorite pictures or types of Christ in the Old Testament? How does Isaac serve as a type of Christ? What about Joseph? What about Jonah? What are some of your favorite prophecies of Christ (note: prophecies and types are not the same!)?Day 3: Read 1 Kings 10:1-9, Hebrews 4:13, Revelation 19:9, Isaiah 11:3-4 and discuss: how is Jesus’s knowledge of people superior to Solomon’s? Why is the marriage supper of the Lamb superior to the supper Solomon prepared? Why will our joy serving Christ be greater than Solomon’s servants’ joy when they served him? How is Jesus’s execution of justice greater than Solomon’s? In what ways did Jesus deal with harlots better than Solomon? Sermon Notes for Something Greater than Solomon Is Here Go ahead and open your Bibles to 1 Kings 10. We spent the last two weeks looking at how Jesus is greater than Solomon, and we’ll continue that this morning. In our first sermon we saw how Jesus built the greater house of God:
51:10 02/21/2021
Solomon Is a Type and Shadow of Jesus in His Kingdom (1 Kings 10)
Solomon is a type and shadow of Jesus Christ while he rules and reigns in 1 Kings 10. The splendor and majesty of King Solomon’s kingdom prefigures the splendor and majesty of Christ’s future Kingdom. After Jesus's Second Coming He sets up His Kingdom on the earth and reveals Himself as the true and greater Solomon. https://youtu.be/O3rQLoe2Fow Solomon is a type and shadow of Jesus. The splendor of Solomon’s kingdom prefigures the splendor and majesty of Christ’s future Kingdom. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Solomon Is a Type and Shadow of Jesus in His KingdomFamily Worship Guide for Solomon Is a Type and Shadow of Jesus in His KingdomSermon Notes for Solomon Is a Type and Shadow of Jesus Christ in His KingdomLesson one: God revealed Himself to the world through Israel’s obedience and disobedience.Lesson two: Jesus is greater than Solomon in (part five) delighting God.Lesson two: Jesus is greater than Solomon in (part six) the throne he sits on.Lesson two: Jesus is greater than Solomon in (part seven) that He is the King of Kings.Lesson two: Jesus is greater than Solomon in (part eight) the worship he receives.Lesson two: Jesus is greater than Solomon in (part nine) his obedience. Sermon Lessons for Solomon Is a Type and Shadow of Jesus in His Kingdom Lesson 1: ______ ________________ himself to the world through Israel’s obedience and disobedience (1 Kings 9:6-9, 10:1-9).Lesson 2: Jesus is greater than Solomon in:NOTE: Parts 1 through 4 are from the previous sermon: Something Greater than Solomon.(Part 1) his knowledge of people (1 Kings 10:1-3 cf. John 2:24, Hebrews 4:13).(Part 2) the supper he prepares (1 Kings 10:4-5 cf. Revelation 19:9). (Part 3) his servants’ joy (1 Kings 10:6-8  cf. Genesis 2:15, 3:17-19, Revelation 22:3).(Part 4) his execution of justice (1 Kings 10:9, 3:28 cf. Isaiah 11:3-4).(Part 5) ____________________ God (1 Kings 10:9, 1 Corinthians 1:24, 30, Colossians 2:3, Proverbs 3:14-15, 8:19, 16:16, 2:4, 3:13, 4:7, 10:1, 15:20, 23:26 cf. Matthew 3:17).(Part 6) the ___________ he ________ on (1 Kings 10:18-20 cf. Isaiah 6:1-4, John 12:41, Revelation 20:11).(Part 7) that he is the ________ of __________ (1 Kings 10:23 cf. Revelation 19:16).(Part 8) the ______________ he ________________ (1 Kings 10:24-25 cf. Psalm 86:9, Isaiah 60:3, Zechariah 14:16-17).(Part 9) his __________________ (1 Kings 10:26-29).Quiz: Pastor Scott described _______. Family Worship Guide for Solomon Is a Type and Shadow of Jesus in His Kingdom Day 1: Read 1 Kings 9:6-9, 10:1-9 and discuss: what is a conditional covenant? Can you give an example? What is an unconditional covenant? Can you give a few examples? What would God do if Israel was obedient? What about if they were disobedient? How would God reveal himself through the nation of Israel? Can you think of other examples in the Old Testament of God revealing himself when Israel was obedient and when they were disobedient?Day 2: Read 1 Kings 10:9, 1 Corinthians 1:24, 30, Colossians 2:3, Proverbs 3:14-15, 8:19, 16:16, 2:4, 3:13, 4:7, 10:1, 15:20, 23:26 cf. Matthew 3:17, 1 Kings 10:18-20 cf. Isaiah 6:1-4, John 12:41, Revelation 20:11 and discuss: what does it mean that Jesus is the wisdom of God? What relationship does Jesus have to the book of Proverbs? What reveals the Father’s pleasure in the Son? How is Solomon a picture of the antichrist? How is Jesus’s throne greater than Solomon’s throne?Day 3: Read 1 Kings 10:23 cf. Revelation 19:16, 1 Kings 10:24-29 cf. Psalm 86:9, Isaiah 60:3, Zechariah 14:16-17 and discuss: how is Jesus a greater king than Solomon? How does Jesus receive greater worship than Solomon? In what ways do verses twenty-four and twenty-five look forward to Jesus? In verses twenty-six through twenty-nine how does Jesus looked greater than Solomon? Sermon Notes for Solomon Is a Type and Shadow of Jesus Christ in His Kingdom We spent the last three weeks looking at how Jesus is greater than Solomon,
48:54 03/01/2021
When Should Children Be Baptized? Three Evidences of Salvation
When should children be baptized? There are basically two views of baptism. One view is paedobaptism, or more commonly known as infant baptism. The other view, which I hold is credobaptism, or more commonly known as believers’ baptism. Because I believe children must be saved before being baptized I would like to give some evidences of salvation to look for in your children’s lives. Here is Part II: Evidences of Salvation | When Should Children Be Baptized. https://youtu.be/kZ7jfcvQeKI When should children be baptized? The view we hold is credobaptism, or believers’ baptism. Because we believe our children must be saved before being baptized I would like to give you some evidences of salvation to look for in your children’s lives. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for When Should Children Be Baptized?Family Worship Guide for When Should Children Be Baptized?Sermon Notes for When Should Children Be Baptized?Lesson one: at WCC fathers play a large part in shepherding their families.Lesson two: salvation is the requirement for baptism.Lesson three: evidence of salvation to look for in your children (part one) godly sorrow.Lesson three: evidences of salvation to look for in your children (part two) spiritual fruit.Lesson three: evidences of salvation to look for in your children (part three) spiritual hunger and thirst. Sermon Lessons for When Should Children Be Baptized? Sermon Lessons for When Should Children Be Baptized? 03:38 Lesson 1: at ______ ______________ play a large part in shepherding their families.Lesson 2: __________________ ____ the requirement for baptism (Acts 2:41). Lesson 3: evidences of salvation to look for in your children:(Part 1) __________ ____________ (2 Corinthians 7:10).(Part 2) __________________ __________ (Matthew 3:8, 7:19, 13:23, Acts 26:20, James 2:17, 20, 26).(Part 3) spiritual ____________ and _____________ (John 4:13-15, 6:35, 66, Luke 6:21, 25, 1 John 2:15, John 3:19). Family Worship Guide for When Should Children Be Baptized? Day 1: Read Acts 2:41, 2 Corinthians 7:10 and discuss: what is paedobaptism? What is credobaptism? What is godly sorrow, and what does it lead to/produce? What is worldly sorrow, and what does it produce? What is the difference between both?Day 2: Read Matthew 3:8, 7:19, 13:23, Acts 26:20, James 2:17, 20, 26 and discuss: why is genuine repentance accompanied by spiritual fruit? For a hint, think of the practice of putting off and putting on. What is the relationship between saving faith and works? What are works, or fruit, we can look for in our children’s lives to be confident in their faith?Day 3: Read John 4:13-15, 6:35, 66, Luke 6:21, 25, 1 John 2:15, John 3:19 and discuss: what does it mean to have a spiritual hunger and thirst? What spiritual truths were Jesus is trying to communicate to the woman at the well? What spiritual truths did Jesus want to communicate to the crowd that followed him after feeding the 5000? Sermon Notes for When Should Children Be Baptized? The title of this morning’s sermon is, “When Should Children Be Baptized? – Part I.” As you probably heard during the announcements we are having baptisms in a few weeks on Easter Sunday. With my children getting older we have been having many conversations about baptism, and when and if they should be baptized. I thought it would be good to help some of you think through your children being baptized too. So over the next couple weeks leading up to the baptisms I’m going to talk about when children should be baptized. Once I finish these sermons I am going to preach on the vision of our church. I try to do this every few years to help establish: Where we areWhere we want to goHow we do things The last time I preached on this was over seven years ago, January 2014, so I am probably overdue. The reason I mention this is I’d like to share something about our view of fathers in the church, that doesn’t just relate to our vision, but also baptism.
58:31 03/09/2021
Not Everyone Who Says to Me, “Lord, Lord,” Shall Enter the Kingdom of Heaven
Not everyone who says to Me, "Lord, Lord," shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven. Many will say to Me in that day, "Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in Your name, cast out demons in Your name, and done many wonders in Your name?" And then I will declare to them, "I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness!" (Matthew 7:21-23). Although rejected by the world and unpopular in the church, Jesus clearly taught that "few" people are going to heaven, and "many" people are going to hell. What can we learn from Jesus' important words in Matthew 7:13-14 and 21-23, and what can we do to make sure we don't hear the terrifying words from the Lord, "Depart from Me, I never knew you!" https://youtu.be/vCIkw3fG9ts Not everyone who says to Me, "Lord, Lord," shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven. Many will say to Me in that day, "Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in Your name, cast out demons in Your name, and done many wonders in Your name?" And then I will declare to them, "I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness!" (Matthew 7:21-23). Jesus taught that "few" people are going to heaven, and "many" people are going to hell (Matthew 7:13-14, 21-23). Table of ContentsLessons for Not Everyone Who Says to Me, "Lord, Lord," Shall Enter the Kingdom of Heaven Tests to Determine Whether We Will Hear, "Depart from Me I never knew you."Discussion Questions for Not Everyone Who Says to Me, "Lord, Lord," Shall Enter the Kingdom of Heaven Sermon Notes for Not Everyone Who Says to Me, "Lord, Lord," Shall Enter the Kingdom of HeavenLesson 1: even spectacular works won’t get you into heaven.Lesson 2: the question is, “Does the Lord know you?”Lesson 3: lack of repentance keeps you out of heaven.Lesson 4: examine yourself to see whether you are in the faith.Test 1 – Have I experienced godly sorrow that produces repentance?Test 2 – Has my repentance produced fruit?Test 3 – Has my faith persevered through trials?Test 4 – Is my life characterized by obedience?Test 5 – Do I practice sinning?Test 6 – Do I have a spiritual hunger and thirst? Lessons for Not Everyone Who Says to Me, "Lord, Lord," Shall Enter the Kingdom of Heaven Lesson 1: Even ______________________ __________ won’t get you into heaven (Matt 7:21-22; Rom 10:1-3; 1 John 2:9; Eph 2:8-9). Lesson 2: The question is: “Does the Lord ________ ______?” (Matt 7:23a cf. Gal 4:9). Lesson 3: Lack of ____________________ keeps you out of heaven (Matt 7:23b; 2 Tim 2:19). Lesson 4: ______________ ________________ to see whether you are in the faith (2 Cor 13:5; 1 Pet 1:6-9). Tests to Determine Whether We Will Hear, "Depart from Me I never knew you." Have I experienced godly sorrow that produces repentance?Has my repentance produced fruit?Has my faith persevered through trials?Is my life characterized by obedience?Do I practice sinning?Do I have a spiritual hunger and thirst? Discussion Questions for Not Everyone Who Says to Me, "Lord, Lord," Shall Enter the Kingdom of Heaven Day 1: Read Matthew 7:21-23 & discuss: What reveals the ‘sincerity’ of those standing before Christ in verses 21 & 22? Why do you think (i.e. what is implied in Scripture) people will urgently try to convince Jesus that they are true Christians? What does this reveal about them - that is - what are they counting on as the reason they think they are saved? Day 2: Read & discuss Matthew 7:21-22; Romans 10:1-3; 1 John 2:9; Ephesians 2:8-9: Are works important? Why? Why not? What other Scripture can you bring to bear on this question? What is salvation based on - works or something else? Whose works do matter in regards to our salvation? Day 3: Read & discuss Matthew 7:23; 2 Timothy 2:19; 2 Corinthians 13:5; 1 Peter 1:6-9: What can keep you out of heaven? Why is repentance hard? What does a lack of repentance reveal about a person? In which one of five tests of salvation mentioned at...
62:43 03/15/2021
Evidences of Salvation | When Should Children Be Baptized – Part II
With baptisms coming up on Easter I preached on evidences of salvation. I wanted to help equip families to determine whether their children should be baptized, because we are credobaptists who believe they must first be saved. While no parent can know for sure that their child is saved, I do believe these should be helpful. Also, these are good evidences to look for in anyone’s life, child or adult alike. I have looked for these evidences in my life when examining my salvation, and I hope you will do the same. https://youtu.be/TezVZLrCFf0 I preached on evidences of salvation to help determine whether children should be baptized; these are good evidences, child or adult alike. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Evidences of SalvationFamily Worship Guide for Evidences of SalvationSermon Notes for Evidences of SalvationLesson one: evidence of salvation to look for in your children (part one) godly sorrow.Lesson one: evidences of salvation to look for in your children (part two) spiritual fruit.Lesson one: evidences of salvation to look for in your children (part three) spiritual hunger and thirst.Lesson one: evidences of salvation to look for in your children (part four) spiritual understanding.Lesson one: evidences of salvation to look for in your children (part five) perseverance through trials.Lesson one: evidences of salvation to look for in your children (part six) not habitually disobedient.Lesson one: evidences of salvation to look for in your children (part seven) obedience.Lesson two: focus on the Gospel when evidences are lacking. Sermon Lessons for Evidences of Salvation Note: parts one through three are from Part I: When Should Children Be Baptized? Three Evidences of Salvation. Lesson 1: evidences of salvation to look for in your children:(Part 1) godly sorrow (2 Corinthians 7:10).(Part 2) spiritual fruit (Matthew 3:8, 7:19, 13:23, Acts 26:20, James 2:17, 20, 26).(Part 3) spiritual hunger and thirst (John 4:13-15, 6:35, 66, Luke 6:21, 25, 1 John 2:15, John 3:19).(Part 4) spiritual __________________________ (Matthew 11:25, 13:11, 16:17, 1 Corinthians 2:7-14).(Part 5) perseverance _____________ ____________ (James 1:3, 1 Peter 1:7, Matthew 13:21).(Part 6) not habitually ______________________ (1 John 1:6, 8, 3:6-9).(Part 7) __________________ (1 John 2:3-5, 3:7).Lesson 2: focus on ______ ____________ when evidences are lacking. Family Worship Guide for Evidences of Salvation Day 1: Read Matthew 11:25, 13:11, 16:17, 1 Corinthians 2:7-14, James 1:3, 1 Peter 1:7, Matthew 13:21 and discuss: why do some people understand spiritual truths, but others do not? What can we do to strive to better understand spiritual truths? How can we try to determine if our children understand spiritual truths? We don’t like to see our children suffer, but what is one of the benefits of seeing them go through trials?Day 2: Read 1 John 1:6, 8, 3:6-9, 1 John 2:3-5, 3:7 and discuss: how can it be true that we don’t stop sinning on this side of heaven, but at the same time Scripture says habitually disobedient people are not Christians? Similarly, we don’t perfectly obey on this side of heaven, but at the same time Scripture says that Christians are obedient, so how can this be? In other words, discuss the balance for both of these situations.Day 3: Read John 4:13-15, 6:35, 66, Luke 6:21, 25, 1 John 2:15, John 3:19 and discuss: what is the temptation for parents when we don’t see evidences of salvation in our children’s lives? What is the wrong approach? What is the right approach? In other words, what is the best way for us to see these evidences in our children’s lives? Sermon Notes for Evidences of Salvation The title of this morning’s sermon is, “When Should Children Be Baptized? – Part II.” With baptisms coming up on Easter I started preaching a few sermons to help equip the families determine whether their children should be baptized. That’s exactly what we are doing as a family.
52:50 03/22/2021
Spiritual Circumcision of the Heart | When Should Children Be Baptized – Part 3
Physical circumcision always prefigured, or foreshadowed, the true and greater circumcision God wanted, which was spiritual circumcision of the heart. Spiritual circumcision of the heart occurs when people repent and put their faith in Christ and are saved. Consider these verses: Colossians 2:11 says, " In him also you were circumcised with a circumcision made without hands (this means it’s not physical circumcision), by putting off the body of the flesh (this refers to the spiritual flesh), by the circumcision of Christ."Romans 2:28-29 says, "No one is a Jew who is merely one outwardly, nor is circumcision outward and physical. But a Jew is one inwardly, and circumcision is a matter of the heart, by the Spirit, not by the letter. " This means the letter of the law, which can’t provide spiritual circumcision. Only the Holy Spirit can circumcise hearts, by producing repentance and faith. https://youtu.be/QYXj75k72wA Physical circumcision always prefigured the true and greater spiritual circumcision of the heart that occurs when people repent and believe. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Spiritual Circumcision of the HeartFamily Worship Guide for Spiritual Circumcision of the HeartSermon Notes for Spiritual Circumcision of the HeartLesson one: children must have circumcised hearts to be baptized.Lesson two: (part one) salvation is the requirement for baptism (part two) but spiritual maturity is not.Lesson three: don’t try to talk your children into being baptized. Sermon Lessons for Spiritual Circumcision of the Heart Lesson one: children must have ______________________ ____________ to be baptized (Colossians 2:11, Romans 2:28, Leviticus 24:41-42, Jeremiah 6:10, Ezekiel 44:6, Deuteronomy 30:6, Acts 2:23, 36-41 cf. Acts 7:51-58). Lesson two: (part one) salvation is the requirement for baptism (part two) but __________________ ________________ is not (Acts 8:30-39, 16:30-33). Note: part one is from a previous sermon: Evidences of Salvation | When Should Children Be Baptized – Part II.Lesson three: don’t try to ________ ________ ________________ into being baptized. Family Worship Guide for Spiritual Circumcision of the Heart Directions: Read the verses and then answer the following questions. Day one: Colossians 2:11, Romans 2:28, Leviticus 24:41-42, Jeremiah 6:10, Ezekiel 44:6, Deuteronomy 30:6. What did circumcision always prefigure? was God upset with these Israelites about circumcision when they had already been circumcised? Day two: Acts 2:23, 36-41 cf. Acts 7:51-58. When did the Jews finally experience the true and greater circumcision God desired for them? Although Peter and Stephen’s messages were similar, why do you think there were such opposing responses to them? Day three: Acts 8:30-39, 16:30-33. When should people, whether adult or children, be baptized? Why was the Ethiopian eunuch able to be baptized? Why was the Philippian jailer and his family able to be baptized? What would have, but would not have, prevented them from being baptized? Is it a bad idea to talk your children into being baptized? What should you do instead? Sermon Notes for Spiritual Circumcision of the Heart The title of this morning’s sermon is, “When Should Children Be Baptized? – Part III.” Go ahead and open your Bibles to Acts 2. With baptisms coming up on Easter I started preaching a few sermons to help families determine whether their children should be baptized. That’s exactly what we are working through as a family. Because we believe our children must be saved before being baptized I tried to give you some evidences of salvation to look for in our children’s lives. While no parent can know for sure that their child is saved, hopefully the evidences I provided have been helpful…not only in determining whether your children are saved, but even if you are an adult, examining your own salvation. We are going to look at a few baptisms in the book of Acts,
50:47 03/30/2021
Jesus Is Willing to… | Colossians 2:11-14 | Resurrection Sunday (Video)
In Colossians chapter 2, verses 11 through 14, we see many things Jesus is willing to do for us. Jesus is willing to give us victory over sin: "In him also you were circumcised with a circumcision made without hands, by putting off the body of the flesh, by the circumcision of Christ" (verse 11). Jesus is willing to be our substitute: “having been buried with him in baptism, in which you were also raised with him through faith in the powerful working of God, who raised him from the dead. And you, who were dead in your trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him, having forgiven us all our trespasses” (verses 12 and 13). Jesus is willing to cancel our debt: “by canceling the record of debt” (verse 14a). Jesus is willing to free us from the law’s demands: “that stood against us with its legal demands. This he set aside, nailing it to the cross” (verse 14b). https://youtu.be/gwaM4slXs6Q Colossians 2:11-14 contains many things Jesus is willing to do: give us victory, be our substitute, cancel debt, free us from the law. Table of ContentsSermon LessonsFamily Worship GuideSermon Notes for Jesus Is Willing to…Lesson one: Jesus is willing to give us victory over sin.Lesson two: Jesus is willing to be our Substitute.Lesson three: Jesus is willing to cancel our sin debt.Lesson four: Jesus is willing to free us from the law’s demands. Sermon Lessons Jesus is willing to… Lesson one: ________ ____ victory over sin (Colossians 2:11, Romans 2:29).Lesson two: ____ ______ Substitute (Romans 6:3-4, 23, Acts 2:24, Colossians 2:12-13).Lesson three: ____________ ______ debt (Colossians 2:13-14a).Lesson four: ________ ____ from the law’s demands (Colossians 2:14b, John 16:8, Romans 3:21-28). Family Worship Guide Directions: Read the verses and then answer the following questions: Day one: Colossians 2:11, Romans 2:29. What did physical circumcision always prefigure? What does it mean that Jesus died for our salvation and sanctification? What is the difference between the two? Why can’t the law produce our sanctification any more than it can produce our salvation?Day two: Romans 6:3-4, 23, Acts 2:24, Colossians 2:12-13. Why do we need a substitute? In what ways is Jesus willing to serve as our Substitute? Why couldn’t the grave hold Christ? In other words, why couldn’t He remain dead? What does baptized mean? In what ways were we baptized into Christ? What does water baptism represent? In other words, what does water baptism demonstrate about our relationships with Christ?Day three: Colossians 2:13-14, John 16:8, Romans 3:21-28. Describe the debt that we owe God. How can this debt be paid? What does it look like for us to pay it? What did it look like for Jesus to pay it? What are trespasses; how are they different than other sins? How did Jesus free us from the law’s demands and what does this mean for us? Why does the Holy Spirit convict the world of righteousness, and what does this have to do with Jesus’s ascension? How are we justified, or declared righteous? Sermon Notes for Jesus Is Willing to… Title of this morning’s sermon is, “Jesus Is Willing.” Go ahead and open your Bibles to Colossians 2: Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians. Over the last few weeks the sermons have been about baptism as we looked forward to today’s baptisms. Last week we talked about circumcision, and of course today is resurrection Sunday. So we’ve got: BaptismCircumcisionAnd resurrection And beautifully all three are tied together in this morning’s verses. Let’s read Colossians 2:11-14 so you can see what I mean… Colossians 2:11 In him also you were circumcised with a circumcision made without hands, by putting off the body of the flesh, by the circumcision of Christ, 12 having been buried with him in baptism, in which you were also raised with him through faith in the powerful working of God, who raised him from the dead. 13 And you,
45:50 04/05/2021
There Arose Another Generation Who Did not Know the Lord | From Victory to Defeat
Judges 2:10 says, "There arose another generation who did not know the Lord or the work that he had done for Israel." This is why the nation of Israel went from victories to defeats. The historical books of the Bible read almost like one book, with each book serving as a chapter of a larger book covering the history of the nation of Israel. But between Joshua and Judges the change is so sharp it could almost seem like we missed something: Joshua is largely a book of victories.Judges is largely a book of defeats. Keeping in mind from 1 Corinthians 10 and Romans 15 that we are supposed to learn from the Old Testament, when we see something this dramatic take place, we should ask why it happened. We are given the answer in Judges 2:7-12. https://youtu.be/rx51zNfVXNQ Judges 2:10 says, "There arose another generation who did not know the Lord or the work that he had done for Israel." This is why Israel went from victory is in the book of Joshua to defeat in the book of Judges. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for There Arose Another Generation Who Did not Know the LordFamily Worship Guide for There Arose Another Generation Who Did not Know the LordSermon Notes for There Arose Another Generation Who Did not Know the LordLesson one: the Promised Land is a picture of spiritual rest in Christ.Lesson two: Israel moved from victory to defeat because they did not (part one) know the Lord.Lesson two: Israel moved from victory to defeat because they did not (part two) remember what the Lord had done.Lesson two: Israel moved from victory to defeat because they did not (part three) remain holy. Sermon Lessons for There Arose Another Generation Who Did not Know the Lord Lesson one: the Promised Land is a picture of __________________ ________ in Christ (Hebrews 3-4, Joshua 13:1, 21:44, 22:4, Matthew 11:28-29).Lesson two: Israel moved from victory to defeat because they did not:(part one) know ______ ________Judges 2:10a, Jeremiah 9:23-24).(part two) remember what the Lord ______ ________ (Judges 2:10b).(part three) ____________ ________ (Judges 2:1-2 cf. Judges 1:28-35, 1 John 2:15-16). Family Worship Guide for There Arose Another Generation Who Did not Know the Lord Directions: Read the verses and then answer the following questions: Day one: 1 Corinthians 10:6, 11, Romans 15:4, Hebrews 3-4, Joshua 13:1, 21:44, 22:4, Matthew 11:28-29. Why do people have trouble learning from the Old Testament? What can we do when we read the Old Testament to find application from the accounts? How is the Promised Land a picture of our relationships with Christ? Describe the rest the Promised Land offered people of Israel. Describe the rest Christ offers His people.Day two: Judges 2:9-10, Jeremiah 9:23-24. How do the Old Testament historical books read like one book? What two books have a sharp change between them? Describe the change. What does it mean that the new generation did not know the Lord? What does it mean that the new generation did not remember what the Lord had done? What application does this have for us? In other words, how can we ensure that the generation following us knows the Lord, and remembers the things that He has done? Why don’t churches want to simply preach the Word of God?Day three: Judges 1:28-35, 2:1-2, 1 John 2:15-16. What does the word holy mean? How is Israel to remain holy? How did Israel fail to remain holy? What are some practical ways for us to remain holy? Why didn’t the Israelites drive out all the Canaanites living among them? In other words, why did they want to keep them around? Why don’t we drive out all the sin in our lives? In what ways has the world crept into the church? What can we do to prevent this? Sermon Notes for There Arose Another Generation Who Did not Know the Lord The title of this morning’s sermon is, “From Victory to Defeat.” Go ahead and open your Bibles to Joshua 21 and I will open us in prayer. This morning’s sermon has been on my heart for a while.
61:01 04/11/2021
When the Word of the Lord Was Rare
First Samuel 3 verse 1 says, "The boy Samuel was ministering to the Lord in the presence of Eli. And the word of the Lord was rare in those days; there was no frequent vision." These words describe the dark days of the judges, which came to an end when God raised up the first prophet, Samuel, to give people the Word of God. Israel was brought out of darkness by the light of God's Word. This delivered Israel from the situation in Judges 2, verse 10 that took them away from God 3.5 centuries earlier: "There arose another generation after them who did not know the Lord or the work that he had done for Israel." https://youtu.be/Ao-rM2kWBao "The word of the Lord was rare in those days" (1 Samuel 3:1). The dark days of the judges, which ended when God raised up the first prophet. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for When the Word of the Lord Was RareFamily Worship Guide for When the Word of the Lord Was RareSermon Notes for When the Word of the Lord Was RareLesson one: Israel moved from victory to defeat because they did (part four) what was right in their own eyes.Lesson two: vision should come from God’s Word.Lesson three: God’s Word restrains sin. Sermon Lessons for When the Word of the Lord Was Rare NOTE: parts one through three are from the previous sermon: There Arose Another Generation Who Did not Know the Lord. Lesson one: Israel moved from victory to defeat because they did:(part one) not know the Lord (Judges 2:10a, Jeremiah 9:23-24).(part two) not remember what the Lord has done (Judges 2:10b).(part three) not remain holy (Judges 2:1-2 cf. Judges 1:28-35, 1 John 2:15-16).(part four) what was right in __________ ______ ________ (Judges 17:6, 18:1, 19:1, 21:25 cf. 1 Samuel 8:7, Jeremiah 17:9, Matthew 6:22-23, 15:19, Ecclesiastes 9:3, Genesis 6:5, 8:21, Proverbs 14:12, 16:25).Lesson two: vision should come from __________ _______ (1 Samuel 3:1, Ezekiel 7:26, Proverbs 29:18).Lesson three: God’s word __________________ ____ (Exodus 32:25, Proverbs 29:18, Amos 8:11-12). Family Worship Guide for When the Word of the Lord Was Rare Directions: Read the verses and then answer the following questions: Day one: Judges 17:6, 18:1, 19:1, 21:25 cf. 1 Samuel 8:7, Jeremiah 17:9, Matthew 6:22-23, 15:19, Ecclesiastes 9:3, Genesis 6:5, 8:21, Proverbs 14:12, 16:25. Why was Joshua’s death such a pivotal moment for the nation of Israel? Who were they supposed to start following at that moment? Who, or what, did they end up following instead? What does the Bible tell us about our hearts?Day two: 1 Samuel 3:1, Ezekiel 7:26, Proverbs 29:18. Samuel is a transitional figure between what two offices? What is the relationship between vision and God’s word? Why were the days of the judges so spiritually dark based on 1 Samuel 3:1? How did God bring the dark days of the judges to an end?Day three: Exodus 32:25, Proverbs 29:18, Amos 8:11-12, Ezekiel 11:19, 18:31, 36:26. How does God’s word restrains us? Aside from the book of judges and the time Moses and Joshua went up on Mount Sinai, can you think of other instances in Israel’s history of them being unrestrained because of the absence of God’s Word and vision? Regarding God’s word, why are we so fortunate today? Our hearts are incurable, or desperately sick, so what is the solution? Sermon Notes for When the Word of the Lord Was Rare The title of this morning’s sermon is, “When the Word of the Lord Was Rare.” Go ahead and open your Bibles to Judges 2 and I will open us in prayer. Last week I shared that we were going to talk about the vision of our church. We haven’t done so for over seven years. We began by considering the dramatic change that takes place between the books of Joshua and Judges: Joshua is largely a book of victoriesJudges is largely a book of defeats As much as Joshua is victory, after victory, after victory, Judges is defeat, after defeat, after defeat. We see why this happened in Judges 2:7-12.
60:02 04/20/2021
The Need for A Holy Church | Vision Of WCC
The need for a holy church is great, because just like God called Israel to be holy in the Old Testament, He has called the church to be holy in the New Testament: “As He who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct, since it is written, ‘You shall be holy, for I am holy’” (1 Peter 1:15-16). We tend to think something is holy if it is moral or righteous, and something is unholy if it immoral or unrighteous, but it’s better to understand holy means separate. For example: When Moses approached the burning bush, God told him he was standing on holy ground, not because the ground was better than other areas of ground, but because it was set apart for God.If there were two identical vessels, but one was used in the temple and one wasn’t, the one in the temple was holy because it’s set apart for God. Israel was holy by keeping ceremonial commands (those dealing with tassels, foods, clothing, farming), and the church is holy by being separate from the world: “Do not be conformed to this world…do not love the world or the things in the world…friendship with the world is enmity with God” (Romans 12:2, 1 John 2:15, James 4:4). https://youtu.be/05RN--psIgU The need for a holy church is great, because just like God called Israel to be holy, He has called the church to be holy (1 Peter 1:15-16). Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for The Need for A Holy ChurchFamily Worship Guide for The Need for A Holy ChurchSermon Notes for The Need for A Holy ChurchLesson one: God always has an inside and outside.Lesson two: holiness separates the inside from the outside.Lesson three: holiness in the church means avoiding worldliness.Lesson four: seeker sensitive churches blur the line between the inside and outside.Lesson five: draw the line at immorality when being “all things to all people.” Sermon Lessons for The Need for A Holy Church Lesson one: God always has an ____________ and ______________ (Matthew 21:31, Mark 4:11, Luke 16:16, Colossians 4:5, 1 Thessalonians 4:12, 1 Corinthians 5:12-13, Revelation 22:14).Lesson two: ________________ __________________ the inside from the outside (1 Peter 1:15).Lesson three: holiness in the church means ________________ ______________________ (Romans 12:2, 1 John 2:15, James 4:4, Hebrews 12:14).Lesson four: ____________ __________________ churches blur the line between inside and outside (1 Corinthians 9:19-21, Galatians 5:6, 6:15, Acts 15:5, 16:3, 18:18).Lesson five: draw the line ____ ____________________ when being “all things to all people” (1 Corinthians 8:7-12, 9:22). Family Worship Guide for The Need for A Holy Church Directions: Read the verses and then answer the following questions: Day one: Matthew 21:31, Mark 4:11, Luke 16:16, Colossians 4:5, 1 Thessalonians 4:12, 1 Corinthians 5:12-13, Revelation 22:14. What does it mean that God has always had an inside and an outside? Why do you think this is the case? Can you think of any other examples in the Bible of an inside and outside that were not mentioned in the sermon?Day two: 1 Peter 1:15, Romans 12:2, 1 John 2:15, James 4:4, Hebrews 12:14). What are some moral commands in the Old Testament? What are some ceremonial commands? What are the differences between them, and why are they so important? What did it look like for Israel to be holy in the Old Testament? What does it look like for the church to be holy in the New Testament? Why is holiness so important for the church?Day three: 1 Corinthians 9:19-22, Galatians 5:6, 6:15, Acts 15:5, 16:3, 18:18. We appreciate the seeker sensitive churches’ desire to reach the lost, but in what way or ways do they typically err? What does it mean to “be all things to all people”? What does it not mean? How do we know where to draw the line? What are some amoral things Paul did to reach unbelievers? In what way, or ways, is Christ the greatest example of becoming “all things to all people that He might save some”? Sermon Notes for The Need for A Holy Church
53:24 05/03/2021
Christian Retirement the Right Way
As a Christian retirement might be in your future. You should know there are right and wrong ways to retire. The Parable of the Rich Fool is one of the clearest places in Scripture discussing retirement. In Luke 12:19 the Rich Fool said, “You have ample goods laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, be merry.” Sadly, the Rich Fool’s words capture what comes to mind for many people when they think of retiring. My hope is to prevent any of us from making the same mistake! Here's Part II: The Rich Man Was a Fool Because…(Luke 12:16-21). Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Christian Retirement the Right WayFamily Worship Guide for Christian Retirement the Right WaySermon Notes for Christian Retirement the Right WayLesson 1: this life is about the spiritual versus the physical.Lesson 2: we can be wise in the world’s eyes, but fools to god.Lesson 3: the rich fool retired wrongly.Lesson 4: Christian retirees can (part 1) mentor.Lesson 4: Christian retirees can (part 2) pray.Lesson 4: Christian retirees can (part 3) assist. Sermon Lessons for Christian Retirement the Right Way Lesson 1: This life is about the __________________ versus the ________________ (Luke 12:15 cf. Luke 4:4, 9:23, 25, 12:33-34, Rom 14:17).Lesson 2: We can be ________ in the world’s eyes, but __________ to God (Luke 12:20; 1 Cor 3:18-19).Lesson 3: The Rich Fool ______________ ______________ (Luke 12:19).Lesson 2: Older people can:(Part I) ____________ (1 Tim 5:1-2; Psa 71:18, 78:4).(Part II) ________ (1 Tim 5:3-6; Luke 2:36-37).(Part III) ____________ (1 Tim 5:9-10; Num 8:23-26). Family Worship Guide for Christian Retirement the Right Way Day 1: Luke 12:15, Luke 4:4, Luke 9:23, Luke 9:25, Luke 12:33, Rom 14:17, and discuss: Why does Jesus teach that we need to beware of covetousness? What is Jesus trying to get us to see about life by lowering our estimation of food and clothing? How should this change our perspective on what life is? What contrast does Paul use to describe what the kingdom of God is and is not?Day 2: Luke 12:16 - 20, and discuss: How can our efforts deceive us into thinking that we are entitled to decide how our assets can be used? What are we often tempted to do by way of giving credit when we are successful? How is wisdom on the world’s standards estimated by God? Why?Day 3: Luke 12:19, 1 Cor 3:18, 1 Tim 5:1, Ps 71:18, 1 Tim 5:1-9, and discuss: How does the world’s mindset of retiring differ than God’s? How does the way we view our resources effect the way we retire? What value does the older generation offer the younger? How can an older saint encourage or invest in a younger believer? Sermon Notes for Christian Retirement the Right Way The title of this morning’s sermon is, “Retiring the Right Way.” We were in a series on covetousness and contentment. Now we’re returning to Luke and I’d like to back up to verse 13 to briefly review and get the context for the parable we’ll be studying… In verses 1-12 Jesus was teaching on some very heavy topics: Being forgiven versus being unforgivenGoing to hell versus going to heaven Right in the middle of this, look at verse 13 to see what happened… Luke 12:13 Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the inheritance with me.” The man looks pretty bad b/c he interrupted Jesus AND told Him what to do. Jesus turned this into a teaching moment…look at verse 14… Luke 12:14 But he said to him, “Man, who made me a judge or arbitrator over you?” 15a And he said to them, “Take care, and be on your guard against all covetousness, It might look like Jesus didn’t help the man, but He did! The man wanted Jesus to help him financially, but Jesus helped him spiritually by revealing the covetousness in his heart.If Jesus gave the man what he wanted, it would’ve hurt him, b/c it would’ve been feeding his covetousness. Jesus said, “Take care, and be on your guard against all covetousness.” I think we took this warning seriously,
56:34 05/10/2021
Eulogy for My Father, John LaPierre’s, Celebration of Life
My father, John Arnold LaPierre was born on September 24, 1951, and he passed away on May 2, 2021. This is the eulogy I shared at his Celebration of Life at Woodland Christian Church on May 15, 2021. If you'd like to watch the full service, you can do so here. https://youtu.be/ovcfDLdLApA The eulogy I shared at my father, John Arnold LaPierre's, Celebration of Life at Woodland Christian Church on May 15, 2021. Table of ContentsJohn LaPierre's ObituaryNotes for John LaPierre's EulogyFavorite memories about John LaPierreTreehouse and importance of familyWorking hard to care for our familyA faithful, loving husbandThings to give thanks for…Recently repeated many blessings with DadDad was able to pass with dignityWe were given many good years with DadWe were blessed with a wonderful church familyThings I’m thankful I did for John LaPierre…I took CPR trainingI told my dad I loved him many timesI shared the gospel with Dad many timesGospel Presentation John LaPierre's Obituary John LaPierre was born in Plattsburgh, New York on September 24, 1951. He attended St. Joseph Catholic School through the 8th grade and then transferred to Dannemora High School where he graduated June 1969. John was active in sports, playing basketball, baseball, and soccer in high school. He attended Cortland State University for three years majoring in physical education. John and Donna were married on February 2, 1974 in Dannemora, New York. John started working for the Department of Corrections in Dannemora in 1973 until May 1979 when he, Donna, and Scott (born in 1978) moved to California. John continued working for the Department of Corrections until retiring in April 2007. John's second son, Jason, was born in 1979. John enjoyed coaching and watching his sons participate in various sports. He also enjoyed hunting, fishing, and camping with his family, and then golf during retirement. John became a Christian in 2008 and his son, Scott, baptized him soon after. When Scott took the pastorate of Woodland Christian Church in 2010, John and Donna followed him to Washington, where John also served as a deacon at his son's church. Shortly after John was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Fortunately, it progressed slowly, so he was able to enjoy many years with family and friends. In January of 2017 John was diagnosed with throat and lymph node cancer. He went through 37 radiation treatments which successfully treated the cancer. Even when John couldn't remember the names of his grandchildren they still brought him great joy whenever he saw them. They were certainly the light of his life. John was predeceased by his father, mother, and son, Jason. Notes for John LaPierre's Eulogy I thought I would begin by sharing some of my favorite memories about my dad… Favorite memories about John LaPierre Treehouse and importance of family I spent most of my young life in MacArthur, which is in the mountains of northern California. That’s also where Katie grew up, and where her parents still live. It’s very rural. We couldn’t see any of our neighbors through all the thick trees. One day Dad took Jason and I into the woods behind our house. He said, “This is where I want to build you a treehouse.” It was pretty neat: completely enclosed with a nice roof, a trapdoor to enter it from the bottom after climbing up a ladder, and a sliding window. After Dad finished it he wanted all of us ,Dad, Mom, Jason and Ito spend the night in it. The floor of the treehouse was plywood, and we slept in sleeping bags. This made for a long, uncomfortable night. The treehouse was good size, but with the four of us rolling over and bumping each other, I don’t think we slept very much. But it was a nice, fun time that I still remember. I also mention this memory because it reveals something about Dad that stands out in my mind: he really wanted us to spend time together as a family. I remember growing up knowing family was important,
28:40 05/16/2021
Can Christians Get Angry at Sin and Death?
Can Christians get angry at sin and death? My father died unexpectedly earlier this month. Because he had Alzheimer’s I had years to think about him passing away and how I would feel. I expected grief and sorrow, but I didn’t expect to feel angry. We should evaluate our feelings to determine whether they please or displease God. We do this by reading God’s Word to see what it says about the feelings we are experiencing. We also look at our premier example, Jesus Christ Himself, to see if He experienced those same feelings because He was the perfect Person. The difficulty with evaluating anger is it isn’t as straightforward as other feelings. There are some verses that discourage anger and others that encourage it. https://youtu.be/AvXFyOleLek Can Christians get angry at sin and death? My father died unexpectedly. I expected grief, but I didn’t expect to feel angry. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Can Christians Get Angry at Sin and Death?Family Worship Guide for Can Christians Get Angry at Sin and Death?Sermon Notes for Can Christians Get Angry at Sin and Death?Lesson one: we should evaluate our feelings.Lesson two: we can be angry at (part one) sin.Lesson two: we can be angry at (part two) Death. Sermon Lessons for Can Christians Get Angry at Sin and Death? Lesson one: we should evaluate ______ ________________ (1 Thessalonians 4:13, Ephesians 2:12, Matthew 5:4, 26:36-38, Proverbs 22:24, Ecclesiastes 7:9, Colossians 3:8).Lesson two: we can be angry at:(part one) ______ (Deuteronomy 9:8, Numbers 11:1, Mark 3:5, James 1:20, 4:1-2, Psalm 97:10, Proverbs 8:13, Amos 5:15, Romans 12:9).(part two) __________ (John 11:31-44, 14:9, Hebrews 1:3, Revelation 20:14). Family Worship Guide for Can Christians Get Angry at Sin and Death? Directions: Read the verses and then answer the following questions: Day one: 1 Thessalonians 4:13, Ephesians 2:12, Matthew 5:4, 26:36-38, Proverbs 22:24, Ecclesiastes 7:9, Colossians 3:8. Would you agree that death is “Normal”? Why doesn’t it feel normal? Why do you think we should evaluate our feelings? What feelings have you experienced when you’ve lost a loved one? Do you believe those feelings are supported by God’s Word?Day two: Deuteronomy 9:8, Numbers 11:1, Mark 3:5, James 1:20, 4:1-2, Psalm 97:10, Proverbs 8:13, Amos 5:15, Romans 12:9. Why is anger a difficult feeling to evaluate? Can you think about godly examples of anger in Scripture? What about ungodly examples? What does it look like to have a godly anger toward sin? What does ungodly anger look like, and why is it often produced in our lives?Day three: John 11:31-44, 14:9, Hebrews 1:3, Revelation 20:14. Why do you think Jesus was angry at Death? Why did Jesus let Lazarus die? Why did Jesus weep, and what does that mean for us with him being our faithful High Priest? Considering Jesus wept, what does that tell us about God himself? What application does the account with Lazarus have for us when we lose believing loved ones? Sermon Notes for Can Christians Get Angry at Sin and Death? The title of this morning’s sermon is, “Can Christians Get Angry at Sin and Death?.” Pastor Nathan preached for me the last two weeks which I really appreciated, so that I could be with my mom and kids, and plan Dad’s Celebration of Life. But even though I didn’t have a sermon to prepare, I worked on this message. I wanted to preach this, versus jump right back into our vision sermons, because of all the people in our church family who have lost loved ones recently. For example: The Raleys lost their sonRobby Lehtonen and Mike Houck each lost a brotherThe Schmitz’s – Allan, Kandie, and Malyna – lost a cousin and nephewAllan Schmitz lost his fatherAudrey Templin lost a sister, and her children lost an auntRichard and Betty Pender lost a sonWendy McFarlane lost a brotherKelli Motzkus lost her fatherBonnie Ailshie lost a grandfatherEdie Cole lost a daughterPastor Nathan’s uncle is on hospice and wasn’t expected t...
49:17 05/23/2021
Three Reasons to Equip the Saints for the Work of Ministry Versus Being Seeker Sensitive
Based on Ephesians 4:11 the church leadership should equip the saints for the work of ministry versus being seeker sensitive. In seeker sensitive churches the focus is taken off believers and put on unbelievers. This is a reversal of the biblical pattern, and it leaves believers spiritually weak, emaciated, and starving. The focus should be on believers so they can be built up, equipped, sanctified, and strengthened. Then they can perform the work of the ministry, including going out and sharing the gospel with the lost. https://youtu.be/HjKjlt6D1nM Based on Ephesians 4:11 the church leadership should equip the saints for the work of ministry versus being seeker sensitive. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Equip the Saints for the Work of Ministry Versus Being Seeker SensitiveFamily Worship Guide for Equip the Saints for the Work of Ministry Versus Being Seeker SensitiveSermon Notes for Equip the Saints for the Work of Ministry Versus Being Seeker SensitiveWe don’t want to be seeker sensitive because (lesson one) it typically means pleasing man versus God.We don’t want to be seeker sensitive because (lesson two) we want unbelievers to be convicted.We don’t want to be seeker sensitive because (lesson three) we want believers equipped and sanctified. Sermon Lessons for Equip the Saints for the Work of Ministry Versus Being Seeker Sensitive We want to equip the saints for the work of ministry versus being seeker sensitive because: Lesson 1: it typically means ________________ ______ versus God.Lesson 2: we want unbelievers to ____ __________________ (2 Peter 2:8, 1 Corinthians 1:18, 2 Corinthians 2:15-16).Lesson 3: we want believers to be ________________ and ____________________ (Ephesians 2:20, 4:11-16). Family Worship Guide for Equip the Saints for the Work of Ministry Versus Being Seeker Sensitive Directions: Read 2 Peter 2:8, first Corinthians 1:18, 2 Corinthians 2:15-16, Ephesians 4:11-16 and then answer the following questions: Day one: what does seeker sensitive mean? Why would a church want to be seeker sensitive? What seems good about being seeker sensitive? What is wrong with being seeker sensitive? What do churches typically dismiss, or get rid of, when they are seeker sensitive? What might churches embrace when they are seeker sensitive?Day two: how should we treat unbelievers when they come to church? How do we want unbelievers to feel when they come to church? Should we treat longtime believers in the church differently than new attendees? If so, how? How should believers feel in worldly situations? How does the gospel sound to unbelievers? How about to unbelievers?Day three: what is the primary purpose of the Sunday morning worship service? Who (besides God) is it primarily for? What do we want to do with believers in the worship service, and why do we want to do this for them? What is the danger of not doing this? Why is it important for unbelievers that believers be spiritually strong? Sermon Notes for Equip the Saints for the Work of Ministry Versus Being Seeker Sensitive The title of this morning’s sermon is “Equip the Saints Versus Seeker Sensitive.” We are resuming our sermons on the vision of the church. As I told you in my last message this is not primarily about our theology. Instead, I want to define why we do things the way we do. This morning we’re going to be talking about why we want to equip the saints versus being seeker sensitive. The term seeker sensitive is an umbrella term encompassing lots of different churches and lots of different practices. It’s very reasonable that across the spectrum some seeker sensitive churches are doing a better job than others. So my point isn’t that everything I say applies to every seeker sensitive church, but I do think what I’ll say generally applies to churches under this umbrella. The other day I read this quote… “When a church changes biblical truths and standards to match current culture they are no longer...
52:11 06/14/2021
They Devoted Themselves to the Word, Fellowship, Communion, and Prayer
Acts 2:42 says regarding the early church, "they devoted themselves to the word (apostles' doctrine), and fellowship, communion (breaking of bread), and prayers." This verse can serve as a blueprint for churches. It describes the foundation of the early church, and it can serve as a foundation for us. Peter preached a great sermon on Pentecost and three thousand people were saved. This huge group of new believers couldn’t be sidetracked by any books, programs, or other churches. So, looking at what they focused on ("devoted themselves to") allows us to see what we should focus on. https://youtu.be/8YyhJ-Y7FdA Acts 2:42 says regarding the early church, "they devoted themselves to the word, fellowship, communion, and prayers." A great blueprint. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for They Devoted Themselves to the Word, Fellowship, Communion, and PrayerFamily Worship Guide for They Devoted Themselves to the Word, Fellowship, Communion, and PrayerSermon Notes for They Devoted Themselves to the Word, Fellowship, Communion, and PrayerLesson one: the early church sets a good example, because of what they didn’t have.Lesson two: Jesus builds the church.Lesson three: we want to equip the saints by devoting ourselves to the Word, fellowship, communion, and prayer. Sermon Lessons for They Devoted Themselves to the Word, Fellowship, Communion, and Prayer Lesson 1: the ­­­__________ ____________ sets a good example, because of what they didn’t have (Jeremiah 6:16, Acts 2:23, 36-38, Deuteronomy 30:6)Lesson 2: __________ ____________ the church (Acts 2:39-41, Matthew 16:18, Psalm 127:1, 1 Corinthians 3:6).Lesson 3: we want to equip the saints by ________________ __________________ to the Word, fellowship, communion, and prayer (Acts 2:42). Family Worship Guide for They Devoted Themselves to the Word, Fellowship, Communion, and Prayer Directions: Read the above verses at the end of the lessons and then answer the following questions associated with them: Day one: when considering the vision for our church, why can the early church serve as a good example for us? Why shouldn’t we try to be original? What else do you think we can learn from the early church? The early church wasn’t perfect. What are some things we can learn from them to avoid?Day two: why do we want unbelievers to be convicted when they attend our services? What does it mean that those listening to Peter at Pentecost were cut to the heart? Why is it encouraging that Jesus said he would build the church? What application does this have for us? Even though Jesus is building the church, what responsibilities do we still have? What can the account with Gideon illustrate for us?Day three: how can Acts 2:42 serve as a nice blueprint for us? What are the four areas (or spiritual disciplines) this verse encourages us to focus on? Briefly describe each one of them and their importance. After taking an honest assessment of your spiritual life, which areas do you feel comfortable with, and which areas have the most room for growth? What practical steps can you take to see yourself grow in these areas? Sermon Notes for They Devoted Themselves to the Word, Fellowship, Communion, and Prayer The title of this morning’s sermon is, “They Devoted Themselves to the Word, Fellowship, Communion, and Prayer” Go ahead and open your Bibles to Acts 2. Just to give you a little direction for the following Sundays, this is our last sermon on the vision of the church. Next week I’m going to resume my verse-by-verse studies through Luke’s gospel. If you want to read ahead, we will pick up where we left off at Luke 12:35…13 years ago. For now, let’s go ahead and read our verses this morning: 36 to 42. Acts 2:36 Let all the house of Israel therefore know for certain that God has made him both Lord and Christ, this Jesus whom you crucified.” 37 Now when they heard this they were cut to the heart, and said to Peter and the rest of the apostles, “Brothers,
51:39 06/20/2021
The Son of Man Is Coming at an Hour You Do Not Expect (Luke 12:35-40)
Jesus said, "You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect” (Luke 12:40). Jesus wants us prepared to serve Him. Our waist must be girded so we’re ready to act quickly, but we need to be able to see where we’re going! We live in a dark world and the light we need to see comes from God’s Word: “Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path” (Psalm 119:105). What is the blessing for those servants who are ready for Christ’s return? In an unbelievable reversal of the servant illustration Jesus says that he will serve the servants who faithfully served him. Jesus compares the way he will return with the way a thief will rob people. A thief does not announce his arrival. He comes when it is unexpected. The same is true with Jesus: the only way to be on guard against a thief is to live in constant readiness, and the only way to be prepared for Jesus’s return is to live in constant readiness. https://youtu.be/vKO5YMwcZ28 Jesus said, "You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect” (Luke 12:40). He wants us prepared for Him. Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for The Son of Man Is Coming at an Hour You Do Not ExpectFamily Worship Guide for The Son of Man Is Coming at an Hour You Do Not ExpectSermon Notes for The Son of Man Is Coming at an Hour You Do Not ExpectLesson one: Christ wants us ready to serve Him.Lesson two: focusing on Christ’s return provides victory over sin.Lesson three: we need God’s Word to see where we’re going.Lesson four: Jesus will serve those who faithfully served him.Lesson five: every generation is supposed to believe they’re the last. Sermon Lessons for The Son of Man Is Coming at an Hour You Do Not Expect Lesson 1: Christ wants us ready to __________ ______ (Luke 12:35, Exodus 12:11, 1 Peter 1:13).Lesson 2: focusing on Christ’s return provides victory ________ ______ (Luke 12:1).Lesson 3: we need God’s word to see where __________ __________ (Luke 12:35-36, Psalm 119:105, Matthew 25:3-13).Lesson 4: Jesus will __________ __________ who faithfully served him (Luke 12:37-38, John 13:4-5).Lesson 5: __________ ____________________ is supposed to believe they’re the last (Luke 12:39-40, 1 Thessalonians 5:2, Hebrews 10:37, James 5:8, Revelation 16:15, 2 Peter 3:3-10, Revelation 1:1). Family Worship Guide for The Son of Man Is Coming at an Hour You Do Not Expect Directions: Read the above verses at the end of the lessons and then answer the following questions: Day one: what are the two illustrations Jesus uses to encourage us to be ready for his return? What does it mean – spiritually speaking – for our waist to be girded? In what way does the Jews participation in Passover serve as a type of our readiness? How does focusing on Christ’s return provides victory over temptation and sin? What temptations can you resist better by focusing on Christ’s return?Day two: why is a lamp such a fitting metaphor for God’s word? In what ways does the parable of the wise and foolish virgins resemble the teaching in Luke’s gospel? What does it mean to be awake spiritually speaking? Why do you think Jesus serves those who have faithfully served him? In what ways does this truth encourage you to live differently? Second to Christ’s sacrifice on the cross, describe some of the most obvious times during Jesus’s earthly ministry that he served others.Day three: why did the New Testament writers of the first century write about Jesus returning soon, even though he hasn’t returned in the last 2000 years? Using 2 Peter 3 what are some of the reasons Jesus hasn’t yet returned? What does it mean that Jesus’s return is imminent? What does it mean that Jesus will return as a thief in the night? In what ways does this encourage you to live differently? Sermon Notes for The Son of Man Is Coming at an Hour You Do Not Expect The title of this morning’s sermon is, “Coming at an Hour You Do Not Expect.”
43:12 06/27/2021
Who Then Is the Faithful and Wise Manager? (Luke 12:41-48)
In Luke 12:42 Jesus asked, “Who then is the faithful and wise manager, whom his master will set over his household, to give them their portion of food at the proper time?" In Luke 12:35-40 Jesus preached about being ready for his return. We could almost think that what the guys are doing in Acts 1:9-11, is the best example of doing what Christ wanted: standing there, waiting, staring off into heaven. But then Jesus preached Luke 12:41 to 48 to prevent us from thinking this. Being ready for Christ’s return means serving. If we want to know who then is the faithful and wise steward we should look at our lives. https://youtu.be/K7gvDjZf8EU Table of ContentsSermon Lessons for Who Then Is the Faithful and Wise Manager?Family Worship Guide for Who Then Is the Faithful and Wise Manager?Sermon Notes for Who Then Is the Faithful and Wise Manager?Lesson one: prepare for Christ’s return by serving.Lesson two: our lives reveal if we don’t expect Christ’s return.Lesson three: unfaithfulness is a strong evidence of being unsaved.Lesson four: the punishment will match the offense.Lesson five: ignorance is no excuse. Sermon Lessons for Who Then Is the Faithful and Wise Manager? Lesson 1: Prepare for Christ’s return ____ ______________ (Luke 12:42-44 cf. Acts 1:6-11, Matthew 25:20-21, Luke 19:16-19). Lesson 2: ______ __________ reveal if we don’t expect Christ’s return (Luke 12:45, 1 John 3:2). Lesson 3: Unfaithfulness is a ____________ ________________ of being unsaved (Luke 12:46, Matthew 25:26, 30). Lesson 4: The ____________________ will __________ the offense (Luke 12:47-48, Matthew 10:15, 11:20-24). Lesson 5: Ignorance is ____ ____________ (James 4:17, Luke 12:48). Family Worship Guide for Who Then Is the Faithful and Wise Manager? Directions: Read the verses at the end of the lessons to answer the following questions: Day 1: Why does it seem like Jesus didn’t directly answer people’s questions at times? What does it look like to prepare for Christ’s return? What are some ways you are preparing for Christ’s return? What are some ways you could better prepare for Christ’s return? How does the world typically reward faithfulness? How does the Lord seem to reward faithfulness? Day 2: Why do people’s lives tend to deteriorate spiritually when they don’t look forward to Christ’s return? What positive changes are typically shown in people’s lives when they look forward to Christ’s return? What is the relationship between faithfulness and salvation? Day 3: Describe the two categories for unbelievers. Looking back at the verses what are the different punishments you see? Why would the punishment be worse for some cities than it will be for Sodom and Gomorrah? Is ignorance an excuse? Why or why not? Sermon Notes for Who Then Is the Faithful and Wise Manager? The title of this morning’s sermon is, “Who Then Is the Faithful and Wise Manager?” We are continuing our verse-by-verse study through Luke’s gospel. Go ahead and turn to chapter 12. We will cover verses 41 through 48. Please stand for the reading of God’s Word. I’d like to back up to verse 35 because this morning’s verses flow from last week’s verses… Luke 12:35 “Stay dressed for action and keep your lamps burning, 36 and be like men who are waiting for their master to come home from the wedding feast, so that they may open the door to him at once when he comes and knocks. 37 Blessed are those servants whom the master finds awake when he comes. Truly, I say to you, he will dress himself for service and have them recline at table, and he will come and serve them. 38 If he comes in the second watch, or in the third, and finds them awake, blessed are those servants! 39 But know this, that if the master of the house had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have left his house to be broken into. 40 You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect.”
57:13 07/04/2021
Pain, Purpose, and Plan: Repurposing your pain to forge a remarkable future
Tracy Calahan interviewed me for her online conference, "Pain, Purpose, and Plan: Repurposing your pain to forge a remarkable future." As a pastor I am not shielded from pain, trials, and tribulations. I discussed some of the suffering I've experienced recently, as well as the blessings and goodness God has shown me and others through it. If you'd like to interview me for an online event, or have me as a guest on your podcast, please let me know. Video of Pain, Purpose, and Plan Interview https://youtu.be/OdvOfuI8TYk Tracy Calahan interviewed me for her online conference, "Pain, Purpose, and Plan: Repurposing your pain to forge a remarkable future." Receive a FREE copy of Pastor Scott LaPierre's book, Seven Biblical Insights for Healthy, Joyful, Christ-Centered Marriages.View all Pastor Scott's books on his Amazon author page.Visit Scott LaPierre's speaking page for conference and speaking information, including testimonies, endorsements, and contact info. Interview Topics The Interview covered many topics including: The recent passing of my father, John LaPierre.How I became a Christian in my early twenties following the death of my brother, Jason, from a drug overdose.Some of the blessings experienced following these difficult trials in accordance with Romans 8:28: "We know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose."How trials are opportunities for us to reveal our relationships with Christ. Everyone can praise God when things are going well, but it takes God's grace to allow us to bear up well under suffering.Two quotes of mine from the Pain, Purpose, and Plan interview that Tracy pulled out share with others to let you know what to expect:“Trials are that fire or that heat that reveal whether our faith is sincere or genuine or not.  It’s not a question if you survive trials, it’s whether your faith survives trials."“Are you going to become better or are you going to become bitter when you suffer?"
34:25 07/12/2021
The Spiritual Rock that Followed Them Was Christ (1 Corinthians 10:4)
First Corinthians 10:4 says, "The spiritual rock that followed them was Christ." What does this mean? Read on to learn about this beautiful type of Christ. This is Part I. Here is Part II. Table of ContentsComplaining Instead of Asking (Exodus 17:1-7)A New Generation Sounds Like the Old (Numbers 20:1-13)A Heart-Breaking, but Necessary JudgmentThe Spiritual Rock that Followed Them Was Christ (1 Corinthians 10:1-4)God’s Glory in Christ Throughout my life water has been so available to me that it never seemed that valuable. There was only one time it seemed to dramatically increase in significance. After my senior year of high school, during the summer, prior to going to college, I worked as a wilderness firefighter. This is when I learned I didn’t want to be a wilderness firefighter! When they trained us they couldn’t stress water’s importance strongly enough. They told it was more important than our tools, tent, food and even the other firefighters with us, because it was something we needed to stay alive. There was an unwritten rule that we could ask for help, borrow food and tools from people, but we could never ask people for any of their water. We went to our first fire in Los Angeles. The temperature was over 100°. We were traveling up and down mountains wearing helmets and boots while carrying our backpacks and tools. It was hot and exhausting. That was the moment water seemed much more valuable. For years after that I never viewed water the same. Let’s think about water’s value and what it’s like being in the wilderness without any to understand the Israelites’ situation when they were in the wilderness without any water: All the congregation of the people of Israel moved on from the wilderness of Sin by stages, according to the commandment of the Lord, and camped at Rephidim, but there was no water for the people to drink. Therefore the people quarreled with Moses and said, “Give us water to drink.” And Moses said to them, “Why do you quarrel with me? Why do you test the Lord” But the people thirsted there for water, and the people grumbled against Moses and said, “Why did you bring us up out of Egypt, to kill us and our children and our livestock with thirst?” So Moses cried to the Lord, “What shall I do with this people? They are almost ready to stone him me.”Exodus 17:1-7 Complaining Instead of Asking (Exodus 17:1-7) Exodus 12:37 says there were 600,000 men, which means there were anywhere from three to four million people. The need for water for a group this size would have been an immense problem. There was nothing wrong with the people asking for water but there was a problem in the way they asked—they “quarreled with Moses” and demanded: “Give us water to drink.” Although the Israelites probably thought they only contended with Moses, he responded that they tested God; they were like children trying their parents’ patience. Despite Moses’s warning, they persisted, going so far as to bring the outrageous accusation that God was trying to murder them: “Why did you bring us up out of Egypt, to kill us and our children and our livestock with thirst?” After everything Moses did for them—such as being used by to God deliver them from their bondage, perform numerous miracles including unleashing the plagues, part the Red Sea, and provide miraculous food from heaven—unbelievably they were ready to stone him. At a loss, Moses turned to God: And the Lord said to Moses, “Pass on before the people, taking with you some of the elders of Israel, and take in your hand the staff with which you struck the Nile, and go. Behold, I will stand before you there on the rock at Horeb, and you shall strike the rock, and water shall come out of it, and the people will drink.” And Moses did so, in the sight of the elders of Israel.Exodus 17:5-6 To encourage Moses and give him confidence, God had him take the rod he used to perform previous miracles: turning the rod into a serpent and the waters of Egypt int...
51:27 07/22/2021
Strike the Rock and Water Will Come Out to Drink (Exodus 17:6)
God told Moes, "Behold, I will stand before you there on the rock at Horeb, and you shall strike the rock, and water will come out of it to drink” (Exodus 17:6) Read on to learn about this wonderful type of Christ. This is Part II. Here is Part I. Table of ContentsBaptism and Communion with ChristA Firm FoundationProducing Living WaterThe Samaritan Woman at the WellThe Feast of TabernaclesStruck Once for Sin"Speaking” to the RockPersonal ApplicationSuffering Doesn’t Mean We DisobeyedAsking the Right WayPressing onRemembering God’s Past ProvisionThe Wilderness Isn’t Supposed to Be PleasantThose Who Have Been Given Much Must Be CarefulProsperity Is Not Always a Sign of Obedience Baptism and Communion with Christ The word baptize means immersed. Think of how we say people are immersed in their thoughts or immersed in their work. Sometimes when Scripture uses the word baptize it communicates immersion, but with something or someone. For example, the Greek word for baptized is used in Matthew 3:11 and Acts 1:5 to refer to people being baptized (or immersed or having unity) with the Holy Spirit. Mark 10:39 is about being baptized (or immersed) in trials. When people are suffering, we say they are experiencing a baptism by fire. First Corinthians 10:2 says Israel was “baptized into Moses…in the sea.” This figuratively took place when Israel crossed the Red Sea. It might seem odd to compare crossing the Red Sea with baptism because the Israelites stayed dry, but it isn’t physical (water) baptism: it’s spiritual baptism. Notice it doesn’t say they were “baptized into the sea.” It says they were “baptized into Moses.” This is about their spiritual immersion and unity with Moses in the wilderness. Paul uses the same words Romans 6:3 and Galatians 3:27 to say we “were baptized into Christ.” Like Israel was baptized into Moses, we are baptized into Christ. Like Israel experienced spiritual immersion and unity with Israel in the wilderness, we experience spiritual immersion and unity with Christ in the church. Along with baptism, the other ordinance is communion, which these words look forward to: “all ate the same spiritual food, and all drank the same spiritual drink.” The idea isn’t that Christ physically nourished Israel in the wilderness: He wasn’t physically in the manna or the water. Instead, Israel was spiritually nourished by Christ in the wilderness, like we’re spiritually nourished by Christ in the church. As we discussed in the previous chapter, Jesus is also our spiritual food. He said, “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger, and whoever believes in me shall never thirst” (John 6:35). A Firm Foundation The Greek word for a small rock formation is lithos. But the Greek word in 1 Corinthians 10:4 is petra, referring to a massive rock formation, conveying the strong foundation Jesus provides. Jesus himself, along with many New Testament verses, use this metaphor: “On this rock (petra) I will build My church” (Matthew 16:18). In the Sermon on the Mount Jesus said, “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house on the rock (petra). And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the rock (petra)” (Matthew 7:24-25). Like Christ was the spiritual Rock for Israel in the wilderness, He’s the spiritual Rock for us in the church: “Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone” (Matthew 16:18, Ephesians 2:20). Probably thinking back to Jesus’ statement to him in Matthew 16:18, Peter used three different Old Testament verses employing the metaphor in 1 Peter 2:6-7: For it stands in Scripture: “Behold, I am laying in Zion a stone, a cornerstone chosen and precious, and whoever believes in him will not be put to shame” (Isaiah 28:16). So the honor is for you who believe, but for those who do not believe, “The stone that the builders rejected has become...
60:54 07/22/2021
Walking By Faith in Business as an Entrepreneur
D'shaunte interviewed me about walking by faith in business. This was for her online conference about taking your business to the next level. She understood that as an entrepreneur you have to trust God and step out in faith. https://youtu.be/-5jhzUctzx4 If you’d like to interview me for an online event, or have me as a guest on your podcast, please let me know. Interview Topics About Walking By Faith in Business The Interview covered many topics including: What is faith, what it looks like, and how to walk by faith in businessThe need to trust God when we begin an entrepreneurial endeavorMy testimony and the faith involved in having our kids, and in particular trusting God with our family. We wanted to trust God and let Him give us the number of kids He knew is bestOur journey going into ministry; it took faith, because Woodland Christian Church was small and only had the money to pay me for eight monthsThe balance between work and laziness; sometimes finding the balance is difficult. It is easy to veer into workaholism or laziness.Opportunity cost and knowing when to say yes to something and no to something else; being able to Prioritize.The enemy of best is good; discerning what's good that needs to be declined to embrace God's best.Applying Matthew 6:33 that if we seek first the kingdom of God all these other things will be added to us. This verse communicates the biblical theme that we should go through life doing what God wants us to do and trust him to provide for us.My sermon Preparation and polishing my notes. This was the beginning of me writing books, because my sermon manuscripts were so refined.How I got into writing and some of the publishing process (traditional versus self-publishing). If you have wondered about publishing this would be good for you to hear.
29:15 07/25/2021
As Moses Lifted Up the Bronze Serpent in the Wilderness
Jesus established the bronze serpent as a type of Him: “As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in him may have eternal life” (John 3:14-15). This is part one. Here is part two. Table of ContentsReject the Manna and Get the SerpentThe Bronze Serpent Represents SinLike the Bronze Serpent, Christ Became Sin for UsThe Bronze Serpent Represents JudgmentSin Lifted Up and JudgedSaved by Faith from the Serpent’s BitePersonal Application (Continued in Part Two)Frustration Isn’t an Excuse to SinGod Disciplines His ChildrenComplaining about Authority Can Be Complaining about God When I was in the military we trained with MILES gear. MILES stands for Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System. Thank of a big game of laser tag and you will have the idea. We would also use smoke, blank bullets, grenades, and Claymores to get closer to resembling actual combat. One day a friend of mine said, “Look at these bushes. They stop lasers, but they won’t stop bullets. We want things to be as realistic as possible, but if people try to hide behind leaves in combat, they’re going to be in trouble. They think they’re safe when they’re not.” Imagine believing something would keep you safe when it won’t, or believing something would not keep you safe, when it would. The Israelites faced a situation that required believing a brass snake on a pole would keep them safe from snakebites! Not only that, it would heal them if they had already been bitten. Let’s look at this account in greater detail to see a beautiful type of our Savior. Remember the context from the previous chapter: Israel is making their second attempt at entering the Promised Land. This is the new generation God would bring in, because the old generation was forced to die in the wilderness. Sadly, this new generation (again) looks like their grumbling, faithless parents: From Mount Hor they set out by the way to the Red Sea, to go around the land of Edom. And the people became impatient on the way. And the people spoke against God and against Moses, “Why have you brought us up out of Egypt to die in the wilderness? For there is no food and no water, and we loathe this worthless food.” Then the Lord sent fiery serpents among the people, and they bit the people, so that many people of Israel died. And the people came to Moses and said, “We have sinned, for we have spoken against the Lord and against you. Pray to the Lord, that he take away the serpents from us.” So Moses prayed for the people. And the Lord said to Moses, “Make a fiery serpent and set it on a pole, and everyone who is bitten, when he sees it, shall live.” So Moses made a bronze serpent and set it on a pole. And if a serpent bit anyone, he would look at the bronze serpent and live.Numbers 21:4-9 Reject the Manna and Get the Serpent Israel had to go around Edom because the Edomites refused them passage through their country (Numbers 20:18). This forced the Israelites to travel far south back toward the wilderness and away from Canaan. Understandably this was discouraging. Combined with the lack of food and water, the people engaged in one of their favorite wilderness activities: complaining (Exodus 15:24, 16:2, 17:3, Numbers 12:1, 14:2, 16:3, 41 and 20:2). Although, one difference in this account is that while Israel previously complained about Moses directly (and God indirectly), this time the people complained about God directly. Then they compounded their sin by complaining about the manna (a type of Christ; see chapter 8), and Israel heaped even more judgment on themselves. All of this contributed to the severe discipline. God didn’t punish the Israelites for wanting their bare necessities met; He punished them for their irreverence. In the past, when Israel sinned, the glory of the Lord appeared and the judgment followed. But this time there was no warning. They didn’t want the bread from heaven,
57:01 07/26/2021
Four Blessings When Choosing God Over Family (Video)
In this sermon I discuss four blessings when choosing God over family. There aren’t many situations more difficult for Christians to face than having to choose God over family. Allow these four encouragements to help you if you find yourself in this situation. https://youtu.be/h9rfdJkGLE4 Choosing God over family is one of the most difficult situations Christians face. Allow these four encouragements to help you. Table of ContentsThe Gospel Creates Peace Between God and ManThe Gospel Creates Division Between Man and ManEncouragement One: Choosing God Over Family Allows Us to Be Like ChristEncouragement Two: Choosing God Over Family Allows Us to Teach Our ChildrenEncouragement Three: Choosing God Over Family Allows Us to Discuss Our FaithEncouragement Four: Choosing God Over Family Allows Us to Show God We Love Him Consider the following: A relative claims to be a believer but wants to marry an unbeliever, so you’re unable to support the relationship.A relative claims to be a believer, but is living in habitual sin, so you have to confront the person. I know people and when they chose God over family: It meant supporting church discipline against a family memberOr it meant asking a child to leave the house because that child was rebellious As you can imagine, even though these people made the right decision, it was still excruciating. There are examples in the Old Testament of people having to choose God over family members. For example… Moses called for the execution of the individuals responsible for constructing the Golden Calf. This meant some Israelites had to kill their own relatives… Exodus 32:27 [Moses] said to them, “Thus says the Lord God of Israel, ‘Put your sword on your side each of you, and go to and fro from gate to gate throughout the camp, and each of you KILL HIS BROTHER AND HIS COMPANION AND HIS NEIGHBOR.’” This gives us a good idea of how wicked idolatry is. Another example involving idolatry… King Asa was one of the greatest reformers in the Old Testament. When he purged the idolatry from the land, he even had to punish his own grandmother, because she made an idol… 1 Kings 15:13 [Asa] removed Maacah his mother from being queen mother because she had made an abominable image for Asherah. And Asa cut down her image and burned it at the brook Kidron. I can only imagine how much criticism King Asa might’ve received for banishing his own grandmother. You could listen to this and say… “Well, this is the Old Testament. It was much harsher. We are in the New Testament, which is more loving and gracious.” But we have reached the verses in the New Testament that show that even though we aren’t called to execute family members, we are still called to choose God over them. But before Jesus talks about choosing Him over family members, He first talks about the divisiveness of the gospel, and I’ll explain why in a moment. Look with me at verse 49… Luke 12:49 “I came to cast fire on the earth, and would that it were already kindled!  Fire represents judgment, so Jesus is saying He came to bring judgment to the earth. This isn’t how we normally think of Jesus’s first coming, is it? We think about him bringing judgment at his second coming but bringing salvation at his first coming. For example, he said… John 12:47 I did not come to judge the world but to save the world. Yes, Jesus came to save the world in his first coming…but what happens to people who reject him? They get judged! In the very next verse Jesus said… John 12:48 The one who rejects me and does not receive my words HAS A JUDGE; the word that I have spoken WILL JUDGE HIM on the last day.  So, reject Christ, get judged, and experience the fire he brought. But now look at the next verse for those who RECEIVE Christ… Luke 12:50 I have a baptism to be baptized with, and how great is my distress until it is accomplished! 
51:14 07/26/2021
Christ Redeemed Us from the Curse of the Law by Becoming a Curse for Us
Galatians 3:13 says, "Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us—for it is written, 'Cursed is everyone who is hanged on a tree.'” All of this was wonderfully foreshadowed with the bronze serpent. This is part two. Here is part one. Table of ContentsUnder a Curse from the LawTaking the Curse of the Law for UsPersonal Application (Continued from Part One)Complaining about Circumstances Can Be Complaining about GodIngratitude Is SinDiscouraged Too EasilyDisciplined for GoodRuining the GoodThe Gospel Is Meant to Be SharedThe Only Way to Be Saved Under a Curse from the Law Galatians 3:10 says, “All who rely on works of the law are under a curse; for it is written, ‘Cursed be everyone who does not abide by all things written in the Book of the Law, and do them.’”  This is a quote of Deuteronomy 27:26 which says everyone who doesn’t perfectly obey God’s law is cursed. Because none of us perfectly keep God’s law all of us are under a curse. Some Jews, whether out of pride or ignorance, believe they can go to heaven by obeying God’s law, but it is this same law that tells them they are cursed if they don’t keep it perfectly. Ecclesiastes 7:20 says, “There is not a righteous man on earth who does good and never sins.” Romans 3:23 says, “All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” The law must be viewed as a unit, which is why it’s always spoken of singularly: law versus laws. The law contains 613 commands, but it is only one law, and to break part of it is to break all of it: “Whoever keeps the whole law but fails in one point has become guilty of all of it” (James 2:10). Imagine a boy who throws a rock through his window. His parents confront him and he replies, “I didn’t break the whole window. I only broke part of it.” This is the same argument as the person who claims to have only broken part of the law. The first part of Galatians 3:11 says, “Now it is evident that no one is justified before God by the law.” Justified means, “Declared righteous.” Nobody will be justified, or declared righteous, by the law because nobody keeps it perfectly. But what is the purpose of the law if not to save us? It is meant to show us our sinfulness: “Through the law comes knowledge of sin” (Romans 3:20). When we become aware of our sinfulness we see our need for the Savior. Because we can’t be justified by the law, we must be justified another way. That is by faith so Galatians 3:11 finishes, “For ‘The righteous shall live by faith.’” This is a quote of Habakkuk 2:4. Those who are justified, or declared righteous, “Live by faith,” versus works for obedience to the law. Galatians 3:12 continues, “But the law is not of faith, rather ‘The one who does them shall live by them.’” By quoting Leviticus 18:5 Paul juxtaposes living by faith in the previous verse with living by the law in this verse. The law and faith are mutually exclusive. To try to be justified by one is to choose not to be justified by the other. When people choose to be justified by faith they are choosing not to try to be justified by keeping the law. When people try to be justified by keeping the law, they have chosen not to be justified by faith. And should people try to be justified by the law, they must also “live by” it, which means keep it perfectly. Taking the Curse of the Law for Us We can be justified by faith, but this still leaves us with a problem: because we have broken the law we are under a curse. Either we bear the curse or someone bears it in our place. But if someone would be willing to bear the curse in our place, he would have to have perfectly obeyed the law so as not to be cursed himself. Galatians 3:13 says, “Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us—for it is written, ‘Cursed is everyone who is hanged on a tree’” This is a quote of Deuteronomy 21:23. Jesus kept the law perfectly and was willing to be hanged on a tree to take our curse for us.
58:35 07/29/2021
Make Every Effort to Settle with God (Luke 12:54-59)
We should make every effort to settle with God before we stand before Him. In Luke 12:58 Jesus said, "As you go with your accuser before the magistrate, make an effort to settle with him on the way, lest he drag you to the judge, and the judge hand you over to the officer, and the officer put you in prison." If we are involved in legal disputes and we are accused and guilty, the best thing to do is try to settle outside of court, because if it goes to trial, we will be found guilty and it will be worse for us. In modern day vernacular, it is as though Jesus said, "Do everything you can to settle outside of court, because if you stand before the judge it is not going to go well for you.” The spiritual application: If we wait to get right with God until we stand before him, then it is too late. https://youtu.be/2IJlFCOLukY In Luke 12:58 Jesus said we should make every effort to settle with God before we stand before Him on Judgment Day. Otherwise, it is too late. Table of contentsFamily Worship Guide for Make Every Effort to Settle with GodSermon Notes for Family Worship Guide for Make Every Effort to Settle with God Lesson One: We should be more interested in spiritual matters than earthly matters.Lesson Two: Make every effort to settle with God before standing before him.Lesson Three: People can’t settle their debt in hell.Lesson Four: Only Christ can pay our debt. Family Worship Guide for Make Every Effort to Settle with God Directions: Read the verses and then answer the questions: Day 1: Luke 12:54-56—What rebuke did Jesus have for the Jews in his day? Why do you think the Jews were unable to interpret the present time? What are you most interested in? What are you most knowledgeable about? After answering these questions do you think you’re more interested in earthly or spiritual matters?Day 2: Luke 12:57-58, Revelation 12:10, Job 1:8-11, 2:3-5, John 8:44, Luke 13:34-35—What does the devil’s name mean? How does he live up to this name? What does it mean to settle with God? Why should we make every effort to do so? Explain Jesus’s second illustration in your own words.Day 3: Luke 12:59, Matthew 25:46, 2 Thessalonians 1:9, Revelation 14:11, Mark 9:48, John 5:29, Acts 24:15, Matthew 6:12, 18:23-27, 1 John 2:1—What did you learn about hell from those verses? Describe our debt. What makes it different than a financial debt? What can’t we do about this debt? What can we do about this debt? What does it mean that Jesus is our advocate? Sermon Notes for Family Worship Guide for Make Every Effort to Settle with God The title of this morning’s sermon is, “Make Every Effort to Settle with God.” I like preaching verse by verse, but one thing we need to be cautious of is taking sections in chunks and looking at them independently of the passages around them. So, it’s a good idea as we go verse-by-verse to consider the context: Look back at verses 35 through 40. You probably have a heading in your Bible for this section. Something about Christ’s return. Jesus is telling the crowds that we must be ready.Then in verses 41 through 48 he talks about faithful servants who are ready when he returns and how they will be blessed, and unfaithful servants who are not ready when he returns and how they will be punished.In verses 49 through 53, which we covered last week, he talks about the purpose of his coming, but it’s not exactly like we tend to think. He says in verse 51, “Don’t think that I have come to give peace. Instead, I came to bring division.” How do we explain this when we know other verses teach that Jesus brought peace? He came to bring peace between God and man, but this can create division between man and man. Then he follows up with this morning’s verses about discerning the time. He uses two illustrations that stress the importance of discernment and diligence in spiritual matters. The two illustrations are: First, discerning the weatherSecond, diligence in settling lawsuits.
48:21 08/01/2021
Jesus Is Our City of Refuge (Numbers 35)
Each city of refuge served as a beautiful type and shadow of our Savior, Jesus Christ. As Hebrews 6:18 says, "We who have fled for refuge might have strong encouragement to hold fast to the hope set before us." Table of contentsThe Cities of Refuge (Deuteronomy 19:5-6 and Numbers 35:9-12)Christ Is Our City of Refuge (Hebrews 6:18)Pursued by an Avenger (Numbers 35:19)Refuge from Death (1 Corinthians 15:54-57)The City of Refuge Is Accessible by All (Numbers 35:15) The City of Refuge Is Near to All (Deuteronomy 19:3)Released from the City of Refuge by the High Priest’s Death (Numbers 35:25)Life Ensured in the the City of Refuge (Numbers 35:26-28)No Other AlternativeHelp for the GuiltyApplicationSpread out for MinistryAre We Welcoming?Are We Content with Christ?Do We Recognize Your Guiltiness? The twelve tribes of Israel were given a portion of the Promised Land as their inheritance to live in. The exception was the tribe of Levi: “The Levitical priests, all the tribe of Levi, shall have no portion or inheritance with Israel. They shall eat the Lord's food offerings as their inheritance” (Deuteronomy 18:1, see also Numbers 18:23-24; Deuteronomy 12:12, 14:27; Joshua 14:3, 18:7). Instead, the Levites were assigned the duties associated with the sanctuary and religious activity of the nation, including being the nations’ priests: “The Lord your God has chosen [Levi] out of all your tribes to stand and minister in the name of the Lord, him and his sons for all time” (Deuteronomy 18:5). Even though they weren’t given an inheritance in the land, they needed places to live, so God assigned them areas throughout the nation. By providing cities for the Levites throughout the land all the people had access to them and their ministry: The Lord spoke to Moses in the plains of Moab by the Jordan at Jericho, saying, “Command the people of Israel to give to the Levites some of the inheritance of their possession as cities for them to dwell in. And you shall give to the Levites pasturelands around the cities. The cities shall be theirs to dwell in, and their pasturelands shall be for their cattle and for their livestock and for all their beasts. “The cities that you give to the Levites shall be the six cities of refuge, where you shall permit the manslayer to flee, and in addition to them you shall give forty-two cities.Numbers 35:1-3, 6 The Cities of Refuge (Deuteronomy 19:5-6 and Numbers 35:9-12) The Levites were given a total of forty-eight towns to live in, and six of them were special, being called, cities of refuge. In the ancient world, there was no police force; therefore, it was up to each family to avenge murders. Under the Old Covenant: “If there is harm, then you shall pay life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot” (Exodus 21:23-24, see also Leviticus 24:19-20, Deuteronomy 19:21). The nearest blood relative to the deceased was charged with the responsibility of executing the murderer, so there was “life for life.” But the nearest blood relative’s own emotions, passion might cloud his judgment. He could end up avenging his relative’s death by indiscriminately killing someone who wasn’t guilty of a capital crime. For example, what if the murder took place in self-defense, or even by accident. Here's a description of such accidents: When someone goes into the forest with his neighbor to cut wood, and his hand swings the axe to cut down a tree, and the head slips from the handle and strikes his neighbor so that he dies—he may flee to one of these cities and live, lest the avenger of blood in hot anger pursue the manslayer and overtake him, because the way is long, and strike him fatally, though the man did not deserve to die, since he had not hated his neighbor in the past.Deuteronomy 19:5-6 Imagine two men are working in the field and one man trips and falls in front of the other man’s plow and animals. Perhaps the injured man later succumbs to his injuries.
54:43 08/09/2021
Are We Suffering for Sin? (Luke 13:1-5)
The common tendency when experiencing trials is to wonder if we are suffering for sin. When Difficult situations occur we wonder what we did to cause the suffering we are experiencing. In Luke 13:1-5 Jesus taught that suffering is not always the result of sin. When Jesus commented on two tragedies that took place, he didn't explain why they happened, because we don't often get to find out why suffering occurs. Instead, he said we must all repent so we don't perish eternally. https://youtu.be/s8ykAvmI8xk During trials we wonder if we are suffering for sin. In Luke 13:1-5 Jesus taught that suffering is not always the result of sin. Table of contentsFamily Worship Guide for Are We Suffering for Sin? (Luke 13:1-5)Sermon Notes for Are We Suffering for Sin? (Luke 13:1-5)Lesson One: Suffering isn’t always the result of sin.Lesson Two: All suffering is the result of sin.Lesson Three: We don’t always get to find out why we are suffering.Lesson Four: We must all repent or perish eternally. Family Worship Guide for Are We Suffering for Sin? (Luke 13:1-5) Directions: Read the verses and then answer the questions: Day 1: Luke 13:1-5—why did the people share this news with Jesus? How would you have expected Jesus to respond if you weren’t familiar with the account? How did he respond and why did he respond this way? How did Jesus elevate these physical accounts to the spiritual level?Day 2: 1 Peter 2:20, 3:17, 4:15, Hebrews 12:5-6, John 9:1-3, Job 1:8, Hebrews 11:35-37, 2 Corinthians 11:23-28—do you see any similarities between the Tower of Siloam falling and the Twin Towers falling, in particular regarding the way people responded? Besides the examples from these verses can you think of other examples from Scripture of godly people suffering?Day 3: Job 38-41—what does it mean that all suffering is the result of sin? Why do you think Job didn’t find out why he was suffering? Why didn’t God tell him? How do we know if we are suffering for righteousness’s sake or because of our sin? What did Jesus mean when he said that we must repent or we will perish? Sermon Notes for Are We Suffering for Sin? (Luke 13:1-5) The title this morning’s sermon is, “Are We Suffering for Sin?” On Sunday mornings we’re working our way through Luke’s gospel verse by verse and we find ourselves at Luke 13. We will look at verses one through five. Many times I have responded to people’s questions by asking them a question. Someone asked me why I do that so frequently and I said, “Why shouldn’t I?” If you respond to people’s questions by asking a question you shouldn’t feel too bad about it, because Jesus seemed to do the same thing. In these few verses he responds to the news about two calamities, not by explaining what happened, but by asking two questions. Look with me at verse one… Luke 13:1 There were some present at that very time who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. Instead of simply saying Pilate murdered some Galileans who were offering sacrifices in Jerusalem, he uses this vivid way of describing the violence. This incident is not recorded anywhere else in Scripture, but it is not out of character for Pilate. Josephus, the great Jewish historian, records several incidents in which Pilate murdered Jews. These people weren’t just talking to Jesus. They were giving him an important news update for two reasons: First, he and most of his followers are from Galilee, so people would assume he’d be interested in this news.Second, he’s perceived as a leader and people would want to know his thoughts. It reminds me of press conferences with political leaders who are being asked their take on some controversial situation. It’s also possible that they might have been warning Jesus because he was heading to Jerusalem where the violence took place. Whatever the case, receiving this news put Jesus in a difficult situation because:
48:54 08/09/2021
Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance (Luke 13:6-9)
We must bear fruit in keeping with repentance. The main point of Luke 13 verses one through five is that we must repent. Jesus says, “You are looking at people who died in these tragedies and asking if they died because they are worse than everyone who lived. Instead, you should ask whether you have repented, because they perished physically, but if you don’t repent you are going to perish spiritually, or eternally.” Then Jesus adds to this in verses six through nine by talking about fruit, because if people have repented they will produce the fruit. John the Baptist said, “Bear fruit in keeping with repentance” (Luke 3:8). Jesus and John put repenting and bearing fruit together because they go hand-in-hand. Usually when we think of repentance, we think only of stopping. We should also think of starting or producing fruit. This is known as putting off and putting on (Ephesians 4 and Colossians 3). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIMk-VVWYSc We must bear fruit in keeping with repentance. When we think of repentance, we think only of stopping. We should also think of starting. Table of contentsFamily worship guide for Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance (Luke 13:6-9) Sermon notes for Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance (Luke 13:6-9)Lesson one: repentance involves stopping and starting.Lesson two: fruit is an evidence of genuine repentance.Lesson three: God is patient (part one) so we have time to repent and produce fruit.Lesson three: God is patient (part two) even when he knows people won’t repent. Family worship guide for Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance (Luke 13:6-9) Directions: Read the verses and then answer the questions: Day 1: Luke 3:8, Ephesians 4:25-32, Colossians 3:5, 12—Why does repentance involves stopping and starting? Explain putting off and putting on. What are some examples of sins that aren’t listed in Scripture that you would stop, and what are the accompanying behaviors you would put on?Day 2: Luke 13:6-7, Matthew 13:23, Acts 26:20, Ephesians 5:8-9, Colossians 1:5-6, Hebrews 12:11—Explain the parable of the fig tree, what the different elements represent, and the main point(s). Discuss insincere temporary repentance and sincere lasting repentance. How can we tell the difference between the two? Why is fruit an evidence of genuine repentance?Day 3: Luke 13:8-9, Matthew 12:20, Leviticus 19:23-25, 2 Peter 3:9, paste that—Why is God patient with us? What happens if we don’t produce fruit, or another way to say it: what does it mean if a person doesn’t produce fruit? Why do you think God is patient with people even when he knows they won’t repent? Can you think of some other examples in Scripture of God being patient with people who did not repent? Sermon notes for Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance (Luke 13:6-9) The title of this morning’s sermon is, “Bear Fruit in Keeping with Repentance.” On Sunday mornings we’re working our way through Luke’s gospel verse by verse and we find ourselves at Luke 13 verses 6 through 9. Recently I shared with you that while I enjoy going verse by verse, because we look at verses in sections, it is easy to ignore what comes before or after those sections. In other words, it is easy to look at the verses out of context. With this morning’s verses it is particularly important to notice how they flow from verses one through five, which we looked at last week: "Are We Suffering for Sin?" The main point of verses one through five is that we must repent. Jesus says… “You are looking at the people who died in these two tragedies and you are wondering if they died because they are worse than everyone who lived. You are asking the wrong question. Instead, you should be asking whether you have repented, because they perished physically, but if you don’t repent you are going to perish spiritually, or eternally.” Now Jesus adds to this in verses six through nine by talking about fruit. The idea is if the Jews repented as Jesus commanded...
50:12 08/17/2021
The Dangers of Legalism and Spiritual Bondage (Luke 10:13-17)
The dangers of legalism and spiritual bondage are demonstrated in the account in Luke 13:10-17 when Jesus heals the crippled woman. Legalism makes people captives as much as any physical disability. The synagogue ruler was angry because Jesus healed on the Sabbath. It is hard to believe that something so beautiful could be so upsetting, but it reveals the bondage he was in—a bondage that was worse than the crippled woman’s bondage. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCxyV95irrs The dangers of legalism and spiritual bondage make people captives as much as physical disabilities as shown when Jesus healed on the Sabbath. Table of contentsFamily Worship Guide for The Dangers of Legalism and Spiritual Bondage (Luke 10:13-17)Sermon Notes for The Dangers of Legalism and Spiritual Bondage (Luke 10:13-17) Lesson one: don’t be kept from worshiping because of (part one) suffering.Lesson one: don’t be kept from worshiping because of (part two) shame.Lesson one: don’t be kept from worshiping because of (part three) bitterness.Lesson two: we can’t free people physically, but we can spiritually.Lesson three: The synagogue ruler was in greater bondage than the crippled woman. Family Worship Guide for The Dangers of Legalism and Spiritual Bondage (Luke 10:13-17) Directions: Read the verses and then answer the questions: Day 1: Luke 13:1-4, 11, John 9:2-3, Job 1:20—What do you think could have kept this crippled woman from attending corporate worship? What might keep you from attending corporate worship? Why do you think suffering, shame, and bitterness might keep people from church? What can we tell ourselves to prevent this from happening?Day 2: Luke 13:12-13—What is legalism and spiritual bondage? What keeps people in spiritual bondage? What does it look like when people are in spiritual bondage? What can people do to be delivered from spiritual bondage? Why is spiritual bondage so dangerous?Day 3: Luke 13:14, Galatians 5:1—why was the synagogue ruler’s bondage worse than the crippled woman’s bondage? In other words, why is spiritual bondage worse than physical bondage? How can Jesus set us free? What does Jesus set us free from? What doesn’t Jesus set us free from? In other words, what do we continue to struggle with after being in Christ? Sermon Notes for The Dangers of Legalism and Spiritual Bondage (Luke 10:13-17) Please stand with me for the reading of God’s Word and turn to Luke 13. Luke 13:10 Now he was teaching in one of the synagogues on the Sabbath. 11 And behold, there was a woman who had had a disabling spirit for eighteen years. She was bent over and could not fully straighten herself. 12 When Jesus saw her, he called her over and said to her, “Woman, you are freed from your disability.” 13 And he laid his hands on her, and immediately she was made straight, and she glorified God. 14 But the ruler of the synagogue, indignant because Jesus had healed on the Sabbath, said to the people, “There are six days in which work ought to be done. Come on those days and be healed, and not on the Sabbath day.” 15 Then the Lord answered him, “You hypocrites! Does not each of you on the Sabbath untie his ox or his donkey from the manger and lead it away to water it? 16 And ought not this woman, a daughter of Abraham whom Satan bound for eighteen years, be loosed from this bond on the Sabbath day?” 17 As he said these things, all his adversaries were put to shame, and all the people rejoiced at all the glorious things that were done by him. You may be seated. Let’s pray. The title of this morning’s sermon is: “The Dangers of Legalism and Spiritual Bondage.” On Sunday mornings we’re working our way through Luke’s gospel verse by verse and we find ourselves in Luke 13. We will look at verses 10 through 17. Jesus’ ministry is well under way and the people have been amazed, not just at the things He’s been teaching, but the things He’s been doing. In this morning’s verses we will get to see him perform a healin...
55:50 09/06/2021
The Parables of the Mustard Seed and Leaven (Luke 13:18-21)
The Parables of the Mustard Seed and Leaven in Luke 13:18-21 describe the growth and spreading influence of the church, but from different approaches. The parable of the mustard seed is about outward growth. Birds from outside fly into and become part of the tree. The parable of the leaven is about inward growth. The leaven works from inside the dough. Leaven makes dough rise from within which pictures the way the gospel changes us inwardly: it changes our hearts and then works its way into our actions. https://youtu.be/jqYR-es4vUg The Parables of the Mustard Seed and Leaven Jesus taught in Luke 13:18-21 describe the growth and spreading influence of the church. Table of ContentsFamily Worship Guide for The Parables of the Mustard Seed and LeavenSermon Notes for The Parables of the Mustard Seed and LeavenLesson one: the parable of the mustard seed illustrates the outward growth of the kingdom of God.Lesson two: the parable of the leaven illustrates the inward growth of the kingdom of God.Lesson three: nobody is physically born in the kingdom of God. Family Worship Guide for The Parables of the Mustard Seed and Leaven Directions: Read the verses and then answer the questions: Day 1: Luke 13:18-19, Revelation 7:9, Psalm 72:19, Daniel 2:35, Habakkuk 2:14—How does the parable of the mustard seed illustrate the outward growth of the kingdom of God? In what ways is a mustard seed a fitting metaphor for the kingdom of God? In what ways do you see the kingdom of God spreading throughout the world?Day 2: Luke 13:20-21, 2 Corinthians 3:18, 10:5—How does the parable of the leaven illustrate the inward growth of the kingdom of God? What similarities does the parable of the leaven have with the parable of the mustard seed? What difference or differences are there between the two parables? How do you see the kingdom of God working in people’s hearts?Day 3: John 3:3, Colossians 1:13—What kingdom are we born into? What does it mean to be born again? Why must we be born again? How can we be born again? What takes place spiritually when we repent of our sins and put our faith in Christ? Sermon Notes for The Parables of the Mustard Seed and Leaven The title of this morning’s sermon is, “The Parables of the Mustard Seed and Leaven.” On Sunday mornings we’re working our way through Luke’s gospel verse by verse and we find ourselves at chapter 13, verses 18 through 21. Please stand for the reading of God’s Word… Luke 13:18 He said therefore, “What is the kingdom of God like? And to what shall I compare it? 19 It is like a grain of mustard seed that a man took and sowed in his garden, and it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air made nests in its branches.” 20 And again he said, “To what shall I compare the kingdom of God? 21 It is like leaven that a woman took and hid in three measures of flour, until it was all leavened.” Let’s pray. I have to tell you that these were some of the most difficult verses that I have preached on in a long time. The reason is that there is such strong, even diametrically opposed interpretations among commentators, about these two short parables. One interpretation holds that the kingdom of God, and by extension the church, grows and then experiences corruption. This interpretation makes sense, because in the parables the kingdom of God ends up containing birds and leaven, which are both presented negatively in Scripture. For example… In the Parable of the Sower birds come and snatch away the seed… Matthew 13:4 And as he sowed, some seeds fell along the path, and the birds came and devoured them. Then when Jesus interpreted the parable he said… Matthew 13:19 When anyone hears the word of the kingdom and does not understand it, the evil one comes and snatches away what has been sown in his heart. This is what was sown along the path. The birds are associated with the devil himself, which obviously makes birds look bad.
50:42 09/20/2021