Show cover of Strictly Facts: A Guide to Caribbean History and Culture

Strictly Facts: A Guide to Caribbean History and Culture

Strictly Facts is a podcast and educational platform that aims to educate and celebrate Caribbean history through our art and music.

Tracks

A Brief History of the Irish in Montserrat with Ursula Petula Barzey
Did you know that, outside of Ireland, the only other nation to celebrate St. Patrick's Day as a national holiday is the Caribbean island of Montserrat? Montserrat's celebration of its Irish connections go beyond a long history of Irish migration and colonialism to also honor its history of Black freedom and attempted emancipation. Ursula Petula Barzey joins this episode to discuss this history and prompts us to consider racial myths and identity in contemporary times.  Ursula Petula Barzey is the Founder & Digital Content Creator of Caribbean & Co. Established in 2014 the aim is to promote Caribbean travel, culture and its expanding luxury lifestyle to potential visitors from across the globe. A native of Montserrat who resides in London, United Kingdom, she travels to the Caribbean often to feature the best cultural and foodie experiences, places to stay and live/work opportunities.  Thrown in the mix is Caribbean history and heritage.  Ursula's mission is to showcase that there is more to the Caribbean than sun, sea and sand.  It is this distinction that has earned Caribbean & Co. has won five Travel Media Awards in recent years. Follow Ursula and Caribbean & Co. on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit MediaSupport the showSupport the show
45:31 09/21/2022
A Brief History of the West Indian Day Parade
The West Indian Day Parade is a decades long staple in New York culture. In this brief episode, listen to how the parade was founded as an ode to its post-pandemic return. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit MediaSupport the showSupport the show
04:05 09/07/2022
A Brief History of Bush Medicine with Dr. Julia S. Jordan-Zachery
Bush medicine, herbal medicine, or roots are all names for traditional forms of medicine used across the African diaspora. These traditional forms of healing carry legacies of history and knowledge as we discuss with Dr. Julia S. Jordan-Zachery following the release of her documentary, Healing Roots, on Bajan women's healing practices. Julia S. Jordan-Zachery is professor and chair of the Women’s Gender and Sexualtiy Studies Department at Wake Forest University. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on African American women and public policy. She is also the author of the award winning books “Black women, cultural images and social policy” (2009 Routledge) and “Shadow Bodies: Black Women, Ideology, Representation, and Politics” (Rutgers University Press, 2017) as well as a number of articles and edited volumes including “Black Girl Magic Beyond the Hashtag” (Arizona University Press, 2019). Jordan-Zachery was awarded the Accinno Teaching Award, Providence College (2015-2016). Jordan-Zachery serves as the President of the Association for Ethnic Studies. Follow Dr. Jordan-Zachery on Twitter. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit MediaSupport the show
28:51 08/24/2022
Carry on Friends: Exploring Dual Citizenship
In the bonus episode, of Strictly Facts: A Guide to Caribbean History and Culture, we’re doing an episode swap with Carry on Friends: The Caribbean American Podcast. In this episode, Keisha and Ashley are American-born with strong Jamaican family ties and discuss how their identities motivated them to obtain their Jamaican citizenship. They dive into what inspired them to consider dual citizenship. Ashley explains that while she didn’t need validation from getting her Jamaican citizenship, it is an opportunity that exists and she chose to take advantage of it. She also encourages others to explore this option.We also touch on dual citizenship for children. Keisha, who has applied for Jamaican citizenship for both her daughter and herself, shares that Jamaica feels like a second home and she wants her daughter to feel the same way through having official Jamaican citizenship.Additionally, they speak about the application process for Jamaican citizenship. Due to COVID, the process has been delayed so those considering this option should manage expectations, and ensure that they have all the details and documents they need to avoid delays. The process is relatively simple and Ashley’s platform provides resources to help guide those interested in dual citizenship. While this conversation mainly focused on Jamaican citizenship, it can and should be extended to all other Caribbean countries. It’s a privilege to have dual citizenship and we should take advantage of it.Mentioned in this episode:American Born, Caribbean RaisedReimagining the American DreamWatch Ashley’s video on Dual CitizenshipConnect with Ashley:  Instagram | Twitter | Website Connect with Keisha: Instagram | WebsiteConnect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
33:12 08/10/2022
A Brief History of Emancipation in Antigua with Dr. Natasha Lightfoot
The anglophone Caribbean and other parts of the former British empire celebrate Emancipation Day on the First of August, commemorating the abolition of slavery on August 1, 1804. In this episode, Dr. Natasha Lightfoot joins us for a discussion on Antigua's intricate story of emancipation, freedom, and the impact of colonialism then and now.  Natasha Lightfoot is an Associate Professor in the Department of History and Faculty Fellow in the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies at Columbia University. Her research and teaching interests include Atlantic slavery and emancipation, Black community formation and acts of resistance, and daily practices of freedom in the nineteenth-century English speaking Caribbean. She is the author of Troubling Freedom: Antigua and the Aftermath of British Emancipation (Duke University Press, 2015), which focuses on black working people’s struggles and everyday forms of liberation in British colonial Antigua after slavery’s end. She has also been published in The New York Times, as well as a number of academic journals including The CLR James Journal, Slavery & Abolition, Small Axe, and most recently the William and Mary Quarterly. Her research has been supported by fellowships from the American Antiquarian Society, the Ford Foundation, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, the British Library, and most recently from the American Council of Learned Societies. She is currently writing a book titled Fugitive Cosmopolitans about enslaved people’s mobility, imperial subjecthood and struggles for freedom between empires in the Caribbean. Follow Dr. Lightfoot on Twitter.  Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
61:25 07/27/2022
The History of US Immigration Policies & Caribbean Migration with Joy Charles
US Immigration policies have historically marginalized people of color across the world. In this episode, Joy Charles joins us to discuss how these policies have disproportionately affected immigrants from the Caribbean despite our long history and major contributions in the United States. A proud daughter of Afro-Latino heritage, a New Yorker and practitioner of the Afro-Brazilian tradition Candomblé, Joy Charles graduated from Hunter College, CUNY, with a BA in Political Science and Anthropology. As a student at Quinnipiac Law, Joy is interested in the areas of international and immigration law where she seeks to become a powerful agent of change by creating policies that effectively address the pressing concerns of communities of color. She is an active member of Juristas Negras (Black Women Jurists), an international collective based in Brazil that focuses on the empowerment and advancement of Black women in the law. Joy is particularly interested in championing the advancement of more people of color in the legal profession and building connections with legal professionals and leaders across the Afro-Diaspora. She is also interested in pursuing research that explores Caribbean migration and US immigration policies as well as the intersectionality between religious racism and the law. In her spare time, Joy likes to travel, read, and practice self-care.Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
28:27 07/13/2022
Puerto Rico's Bomba: A Musical Revolution with Dr. Sarah Bruno
Long before Puerto Rico became known for reggaeton, the island had bomba. A music and dance tradition created by enslaved and self-emancipated Africans to forge community and even incite rebellion, bomba has continued to grow as a space of Black identity, community, and ancestral connection. In this episode, Dr. Sarah Bruno shares with us this history.  Sarah Bruno is the 2022-2023 postdoctoral fellow in Latinx Art, Cultures, and Religions in the Humanities Research Center at Rice University. Her research and art lie at the intersections of performance, diaspora, and digitality. She is currently creating a digital exhibition of the Fernando Pico papers, and as a member of LifeXCode: Digital Humanities Against Enclosure and Taller Electric Marronage. The Pico Papers informs her first manuscript, Re-Sounding Resistencia where she uses the Afro-Puerto Rican genre of bomba as a site and method in constructing a cartography of Black Puerto Rican femme feeling throughout history.  Dr. Bruno was a Mellon ACLS Dissertation Fellow in 2020-2021 and the 2020 awardee of the Association of Black Anthropologists Vera Green Prize for Public Anthropology. Bruno was the 2021-2022 ACLS Emerging Voices Race and Digital Technologies postdoctoral fellow at the Franklin Humanities Institute and in the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University.  She charges herself to continue to write with care about the never-ending process of enduring, imagining, thriving, and healing in Puerto Rico and its diaspora. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
28:09 06/29/2022
Strictly Facts' Summer Reading 2022
What a better time to catch up on some Caribbean history books than during  Caribbean American Heritage Month! We're reading Aunty Roachy Seh by Louise Bennett-Coverley, Black Jacobins by C.L.R. James, and Far from Mecca: Globalizing the Muslim Caribbean by Aliyah Khan. Read along with us and let us know what else you're reading this summer! Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
03:44 06/15/2022
Sir Randol Fawkes & Bahamian Labor History
Happy National Caribbean Heritage Month! In this episode, we celebrate the life and legacy of Sir Randol F. Fawkes, Bahamian "Father of Labor," in honor of  Sir Randol Fawkes Labor Day this Friday, June 3rd. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
07:19 06/01/2022
Carry On Friends: In Solidarity
In this bonus episode of Strictly Facts, we’re doing an episode swap with Carry On Friends The Caribbean American Podcast featuring the episode "Solidarity". In this episode we discuss the legacy of Caribbean Americans in Civil Rights and the importance of continuing our participation for equal rights.In the words of Black Uhuru's "Solidarity!" Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
31:44 05/18/2022
Who Are Your National Heroes?
Celebrations of national heroes in the Caribbean pay homage to individuals who have had an immense impact on the region. In this quick chat, we discuss Barbados' national heroes and their impact, and even talk about who we'd like to see as national heroes moving forward. Let us know who you think should be your island's next national hero!Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
04:32 05/04/2022
Haiti: The Legacy of the First Black Republic with Dr. Yveline Alexis
Formerly known as Saint Domingue, Haiti is the world's first Black republic and the first independent Caribbean nation. Despite these facts, Haiti has faced a series of postcolonial challenges rooted in the racial threat the Haiti Revolution (1791-1804) posed to the rest of the world. Dr. Yveline Alexis joins our discussion to discuss the legacy of the Haitian Revolution and the numerous examples of neocolonial imposition Haiti faced in the aftermath of independence.  Yveline Alexis studies the Global Black past. She is an Associate Professor at Oberlin College. Her first book, Haiti Fights Back gained the prized Haitian Studies Association Book award and a nod in The Times Literary Supplement as a 2021 Book of the Year. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
42:23 04/20/2022
Post-emancipation Migrations in the French Caribbean with Dr. Philippe Zacaïr
In a similar fashion to other Caribbean islands, Guadeloupe, Martinique, and Haiti remained in close connection throughout France's colonialism. Dr. Philippe Zacaïr joins this episode to discuss how these connections strengthened after Haiti's triumph as the first Black republic in 1804.Philippe Zacaïr was born and raised in Guadeloupe, in the Eastern Caribbean. He received his Ph.D. in history in 1999 from the University of Paris-Sorbonne Nouvelle in France. He has been a faculty member of the History Department of California State University Fullerton since 2002. He teaches Latin American, Caribbean, and world history. He is the editor of Haiti and Haitians in the Wider Caribbean (University Press of Florida, 2010). His work has appeared in Cahiers du Monde Hispanique et Luso-Brésilien, Caribbean Studies, The Journal of Caribbean History, French Colonial History, the Bulletin d’Histoire de la Guadeloupe, and Recherches Haïtiano-Antillaises. His current research projects explore political and economic migrations within the Caribbean basin after the abolition of African slavery, and the relations between the Republic of Haiti and the French Caribbean colonies of Guadeloupe and Martinique until the turn of the twentieth century.Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
40:22 04/06/2022
The History of Jewish-Caribbean Connections in the Caribbean with Ainsley Henriques
Jewish life in the Caribbean extends as far back as the fifteenth century with Jewish-European migration following patterns of trade and colonialism to the region. Ainsley Henriques, Jewish-Jamaican genealogist and Administrator of Kahal Kadosh Sha'are Shalom synagogue in Kingston, Jamaica, joins Strictly Facts to map out this long history and describe how it figures into the Caribbean's ethnic diversity. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Visit  www.strictlyfactspod.com. Produced by Breadfruit Media
27:28 03/23/2022
Calypso: The Original Music of the Caribbean with Meagan A. Sylvester - Music Sociologist.Author.Researcher
Originating in the nineteen century, calypso is a genre of Caribbean music that can be traced since spread across the region and its diaspora through migration. In this episode, we discuss calypso's evolving history, impact, and representation of Caribbean culture and society.  Meagan A. Sylvester - Music Sociologist.Author.Researcher is a published author of over fifteen book chapters and journal articles and is a well know public academic in her native Trinidad and Tobago where she participates in both television and radio discussions on the Calypso and Soca musical artforms. Her research topics of interest are Music and National Identity in Calypso and Soca, Music of Diasporic Carnivals, Narratives of Resistance in Calypso and Ragga Soca music, Steelpan and kaisoJazz musical identities, Gender and Identity in Calypso and Soca music and Music and Human Rights in the Americas. She has presented academic papers and hosted scholarly workshops in several spaces across the globe including Europe, Latin America, South America, the United States and numerous islands in the Caribbean.She has recently completed her a Ph.D. in Sociology of Music at The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus, Trinidad and Tobago and holds memberships in professional organizations include the Society for Ethnomusicology, the International Association of the Study for Popular Music, Caribbean Studies Association and the Association of Black Sociologists. Follow Dr. Sylvester on Facebook and Twitter. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Visit  www.strictlyfactspod.com. Produced by Breadfruit MediaSupport the show
50:08 03/09/2022
The History of the Garifuna: Indigenous Legacies in the Caribbean with Dr. Paul Joseph López Oro
The Garifuna are an Afro-indigenous community  native to Saint Vincent who,  in the late eighteenth century, were forcibly exiled to Central America after surrendering to the British during the Second Carib War. Dr. Paul Joseph López Oro joins this episode to discuss this history and the preservation and legacy of Garifuna traditions throughout Central America and the US today. Dr. Paul Joseph López Oro is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Africana Studies at Smith College and the 2021-2022 Miriam Jiménez Román Fellow at The LatinX Project at New York University. His research and teaching interests are on Black Latin American and U.S. Black Latinx social movements, Black Feminist & LGBTQ activism and political mobilizations, and Black Queer Feminist ethnographies in the Américas. His in-progress manuscript, Indigenous Blackness in the Americas: The Queer Politics of Self-Making Garifuna New York is a transdisciplinary ethnography on how gender and sexuality shapes the ways in which transgenerational Garifuna New Yorkers of Central American descent negotiate, perform, and articulate their multiple subjectivities as Black, Indigenous, and Central American Caribbeans. Follow Dr. López Oro on Twitter. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Visit  www.strictlyfactspod.com. Produced by Breadfruit Media
43:23 02/23/2022
The Aftermath of the Panama Canal with Dr. Khemani Gibson
Following the completion of the Panama Canal in 1914, some West Indian migrants returned home, but also many stayed and formed new West Indian-Panamanian communities. In this episode Dr. Khemani Gibson shares the challenges and experiences these newly formed communities faced and helps us reconsider the limits of nation and empire in the Caribbean.  Khemani Gibson is a historian of the African Diaspora focusing on the Black migration in the Caribbean Basin looking at the West Indian immigrant community in Panama during the twentieth century. For his manuscript entitled: Citizens of Their Own Nation: The West Indian Immigrant Community in Panama, 1914-1961, he examines how West Indian immigrants used migration and claims making as methods to achieve full freedom in the post-emancipation circum-Caribbean. The manuscript explores the development of the West Indian immigrant community in Panama and how its members responded to the racial antagonism they encountered while dealing with the Americans, the British, and the Panamanians. Moreover, Khemani argues that despite the various strategies community members used to navigate the racial politics of the Isthmus, the experiences of the West Indian immigrant community in Panama forces us to reconceptualize our understanding of diasporic citizenship.While committed to his work as an academic, Khemani is deeply committed to bridging the gap between the academy and marginalized communities. Khemani uses his training as a historian to help lead workshops that illuminate the ways that inequalities of the past have a continued effect on Black and brown communities. Moreover, Khemani is committed to blending historical inquiry with modern day technology via mediums such as social media and interactive websites to make academic knowledge more accessible to others beyond the academy. It is Khemani's hope that he not only produces groundbreaking scholarship that helps us to understand how marginalized people navigated racially antagonistic societies but also to use his research and expertise to help community organizers and leaders strategize about how to address social ills.Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit MediaSupport the show
28:23 02/09/2022
The History of Papiamentu/o in the Dutch Caribbean with Keisha Wiel
The Caribbean is rich with diversity, including our languages. In this episode, Keisha I. Wiel joins us in sharing about the history of Papiamentu/o, the widely spoken language in the Dutch Caribbean islands, and even official language in Aruba and Curaçao, that combines Dutch, Spanish, and Portuguese. Keisha Wiel is a PhD candidate in the anthropology department at Temple University with a concentration in linguistic anthropology.  Her dissertation research examines language socialization, multilingualism, linguistic rights, and education in a postcolonial state.  Her research interests primarily focus on the socialization of language ideas in education how it frames the identity of students.  Specifically, her dissertation research is based on how children are socialized into ideas about Papiamento/u and Dutch in secondary education in Aruba and Curaçao. Follow Keisha on Twitter here.  Don't forget to take the Strictly Facts 2022 Listener Survey. Complete for a chance to win an Amazon gift card and let us know what you'd like to see from us in the new year!  Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
49:54 01/26/2022
Happy First Birthday Strictly Facts!
This week we're celebrating Strictly Facts's first birthday! This brief episode is a massive thank you to all our listeners and a note to take the Strictly Facts 2022 Listener Survey. Complete for a chance to win an Amazon gift card and let us know what you'd like to see from us in the new year!  Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
03:06 01/12/2022
The History of Jamaica's Maroons with Chief Richard Currie
Maroon populations across Latin America and the Caribbean have a unique history of self-emancipation  and, for some, sovereignty. In this episode, His Excellency, Chief Richard Currie, Head of State of Cockpit Country, one of Jamaica's maroon communities, joins us for a necessary discussion on the maroons' origins and their significance in Jamaican history. Follow Chief Currie on Instagram and Twitter and support Cockpit Country's fundraiser. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
27:16 12/22/2021
Celebrating the Holidays in the Caribbean
It is indeed the most wonderful time of the year with family and traditions bringing us together for the holidays. Our penultimate episode of 2021 discusses just some of the ways we celebrate the holidays in the Caribbean with food, fun, and of course music and culture. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
05:57 12/08/2021
The U.S. Virgin Islands: The History of Danish and US Colonialism with Dr. Hadiya Sewer
Made up of the main islands of Saint Croix, Saint John, and Saint Thomas, the U.S. Virgin Islands has remained under colonial rule since Danish invasion in the latter 1600s.  In this episode, Dr. Hadiya Sewer historicizes local revolutions and reception to the USVI's longstanding occupation, also highlighting the effects of American colonialism over last century.Hadiya Sewer is a Research Fellow in the African and African American Studies Program at Stanford University and a Visiting Scholar in the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice at Brown University. Dr. Sewer's work uses a non-sovereign territory in the Caribbean, the United States Virgin Islands, as a case study for tracing the conceptions of freedom and the human that exist under contemporary colonialism. Sewer earned their Ph.D. in Africana Studies at Brown University. Their scholarship focuses on environmental justice and Africana decolonial, feminist, queer, and political theories. They are currently working on two monographs titled, “(De)Colonial Desires: Blackness, Aporia, and the Afterlives of the Dead,” and "Black as Nature: Climate Disaster, Covid-19, and the Coloniality of Power." Dr. Sewer's research, teaching, and advocacy provide phenomenological, ethnographic, and historical examinations of anti-blackness, colonialism, imperialism, and the climate crisis. As a community-engaged scholar, Sewer is also the President and Co-Founder of St.JanCo: the St. John Heritage Collective, a land rights and cultural heritage preservation nonprofit in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands and a founding member of the Virgin Islands Studies Collective. Follow Dr. Sewer on Twitter and Instagram. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
44:40 11/24/2021
The History of Belizean Culture and Migration with Dr. Nicole Ramsey
Formerly known as British Honduras, Belize's culture has evolved from a series of Black and indigenous people moving to and from the country. In this episode, Dr. Nicole Ramsey shares how these movements have been critical to Belize's identity formation, as well as the growing diaspora in the U.S west coast.  Dr. Nicole Ramsey is an interdisciplinary educator, writer and researcher from Los Angeles, California. She is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American an African Studies at the University of Virginia. Her research examines formations of blackness, identity and nation and is concerned with conceptions of belonging across the circum-Caribbean and particularly in Belize and the Belizean diaspora in the U.S. Follow Nicole on Twitter and Instagram. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
29:24 11/10/2021
The History of the Panama Canal: Reconsidering Race and Borders with Dr. Kaysha Corinealdi
The Panama Canal was envisioned as a waterway to connect the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans hundreds of years before its construction. When official building began in the 19th century and continued into the 20th century, thousands of  Francophone and Anglophone Caribbean people migrated as laborers to the canal zone. Dr. Kaysha Corinealdi joins us to talk about how their migration transformed Panamanian society and Panama's growing diaspora. Dr. Kaysha Corinealdi is an Assistant Professor of History at Emerson College. Her research and teaching interests include twentieth century histories of empire, migration, feminism, and Afro-diasporic activism in the Americas. Her forthcoming book, Panama in Black, centers the activism of Afro-Caribbean migrants and their descendants as they navigated practices and policies of anti-Blackness, xenophobia, denationalization, and white supremacy in Panama and the United States. Her research and reviews can also be found in the Caribbean Review of Gender Studies, the International Journal of Africana Studies, the Hispanic American Historical Review, and the Global South. Dr. Corinealdi’s research has been supported by the Mellon Foundation, the Institute for Citizens and Scholars, and the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. Follow Dr. Corinealdi on Twitter. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
32:44 10/27/2021
The Life and Legacy of the Steppin' Razor: Peter Tosh
Rastafari reggae musician and activist Peter Tosh (1944-1987) was born Winston Hubert McIntosh in Westmoreland, Jamaica. Tosh quickly went on to found musical group The Wailers alongside Bob Marley and Bunny Wailer. After the group disbanded in 1974, Tosh continued to make music as a solo artist, with hits like "Legalize It" and "Equal Rights," as well as being an advocate for Black freedom in Jamaica and across the world.  Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
07:08 10/13/2021
The History of the Dutch Caribbean Islands with Dr. Margo Groenewoud
We have many differences in the Caribbean, namely language, but also many similarities. In this week's episode, Dr. Margo Groenewoud shares with us the creative, political, and social histories of the Dutch Caribbean and why she believes islands like Aruba, Bonaire, and Curaçao are sometimes neglected in discussions about the Caribbean region. Dr. Margo Groenewoud is a Caribbean lecturer and researcher working at the intersection of humanities and social sciences. She obtained a PhD degree at the University of Leiden (humanities) and the University of Curaçao (social sciences). As social historian she specializes in the twentieth century Dutch Caribbean, with as particular interests postcolonialism, social justice, cultural and intellectual history and digital humanities. She is senior lecturer at the University of Curaçao and board member of the University of Curaçao Research Institute (UCRI). Current research projects include Traveling Caribbean Heritage (NWO, 2018-2021) and the Caribbean Studies and Digital Humanities Institute (NEH, 2019-2020). Dr. Groenewoud teaches social justice and community development at the Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences and is involved in ZonMw funded Participatory Action Research in Public and Mental Health, studying policies and practices relative to equity and inclusion in small island developing societies.Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit MediaSupport the show
38:24 09/29/2021
Puerto Rico's Long Fight for Independence with Nina Vazquez
Puerto Rico is one of America's remaining colonies after being ceded to the U.S. by Spain in 1898. In this episode, Puerto Rican scholar Nina Vazquez discusses the island's long history of colonization and activism in an attempt to become an independent Caribbean island and what are the current beliefs around independence today.  Nina Vazquez is an aspiring Caribbeanist Historian. She is originally from Aguada, Puerto Rico and she moved stateside where she has earned her Bachelor degree(s) in Criminal Justice and Political Science with a concentration in Racism. She recently graduated from the University of Connecticut with her Master’s Degree in Puerto Rican, Caribbean and Latinx Studies. Nina is an avid advocate for Puerto Rican independence and liberation for all women in the Caribbean and across the globe. She is known for her community activism in the state of Connecticut and in Puerto Rico. Nina Vazquez hopes to educate people on Puerto Rico’s history to better understand the island’s status today. Follow Nina on Twitter and Instagram!Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
50:01 09/15/2021
Colonial Connections: Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Turks & Caicos
Did you know Jamaica, the Cayman Islands, and Turks & Caicos used to make up the Colony of Jamaica, governed by the UK until 1959? In this episode, we trace the history of these islands and the others that were formerly part of the Colony of Jamaica and discuss why they disbanded.Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
06:21 09/01/2021
The History of West Indians in Canada with Dr. Marlene Gaynair
With both Anglophone and Francophone Caribbean connections, Canada is one of the foremost locations of Caribbean life in the diaspora. Featuring Jamaican-Canadian historian Dr. Marlene Gaynair, we discuss Canada's longstanding, and at times problematic, historical relationship with the Caribbean and how West Indians abroad have created unity and community namely since the twentieth century.  Dr. Marlene Gaynair is a historian of the Black Atlantic, with a particular focus on North America and the English-speaking Caribbean. She is an associate editor at Gotham, The Center for New York City History, and architect of "Islands in the North," an interactive, curated exhibit (re)creating Black cultural and spatial identities in Toronto. In the coming year, she will be the William Lyon Mackenzie King Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard Weatherhead Center, and thereafter, assistant professor of History at Washington State University. Follow Dr. Gaynair on Twitter at @blkatlanticCDN. Connect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
41:16 08/18/2021
The West Indian Federation (1958-1962) with Dr. Patsy Lewis
Before many of the formerly British Caribbean territories became independent nations, they attempted to create a political union known as the West Indian Federation. The short-lived union only lasted four years, but went on to influence future organizations for regional unity like the Caribbean Free Trade Association (CARIFTA), which later became the Caribbean Community (CARICOM). Joined by Dr. Patsy Lewis, we discuss the history of the West Indian Federation, its failures, and current and future possibilities for regional integration. Dr. Patsy Lewis is a Visiting Professor and Faculty Fellow of the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs and the Director of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Brown University. She is a graduate of Cambridge University (Mphil, PhD.) and the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica (BA). Before coming to Brown she was Professor of Regional Integration and Small States Development at the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica. Her work explores the development challenges of small Caribbean states, with a particular focus on regional integration, globalization, trade, agriculture, migration and environmental and political crises.OECS- Organisation of Eastern Caribbean StatesCSME- CARICOM Single Market and EconomyConnect with Strictly Facts -  Instagram | Facebook | TwitterLooking  to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Produced by Breadfruit Media
47:38 08/04/2021