Show cover of Strictly Facts: A Guide to Caribbean History and Culture

Strictly Facts: A Guide to Caribbean History and Culture

Are you passionate about Caribbean history, its diverse culture, and its impact on the world? Join Strictly Facts: A Guide to Caribbean History and Culture as we explore the rich tapestry of Caribbean stories told through the eyes of its people – historians, artists, experts, and enthusiasts who share empowering facts about the region’s past, present, and future. Strictly Facts is a biweekly podcast, hosted by Alexandria Miller, that delves deep into the heart and soul of the Caribbean, celebrating its vibrant heritage, widespread diaspora, and  the stories that shaped it. Through this immersive journey into the Caribbean experience, this educational series empowers, elevates, and unifies the Caribbean, its various cultures, and its global reach across borders. 

Tracks

Language as Liberation: The History of French-based Antillean Kwéyòl with Soir Smith
Join us as we journey through the linguistic heritage of Saint Lucia with Soir Smith, a passionate St. Lucian Kwéyòl advocate, guiding us through the colorful landscape of French-based creole languages that flourish across the Caribbean. These tongues, far from just a derivative of French, are rich embodiments of culture, history, and identity. We unravel these histories woven from the threads of African, European, and Indigenous Caribbean peoples, challenging the notion that Creole is merely "broken French." Together, we celebrate the unique complexities of these languages, reflecting resilience in the face of colonization.Our exploration deepens as we traverse the grammar and verb usage of St. Lucian Creole, uncovering how it is distinguished from its French roots. We dissect the verb 'to be,' marvel at the absence of silent letters, and ponder the historical weight carried by speaking Creole. Smith shares her journey, weaving personal tales and the profound motivation behind her mission to author a book on St. Lucian Creole. This episode isn't just a discussion; it's an homage to a language that represents freedom and unyielding ancestral bonds throughs linguistic liberationAs a passionate advocate for language and culture, Soir Smith has dedicated her life to preserving and promoting the rich heritage of Saint Lucian kwéyòl. With a deep love for writing, Smith has recently accomplished a significant milestone by completing her first book, a comprehensive guide to learning the language of Saint Lucian kwéyòl. An Introduction to Kwéyòl Sent Lisi serves as a testament to her commitment to preserving the essence of St. Lucian cultural identity. By providing a comprehensive guide, Smith aims to empower individuals to embrace and celebrate their unique linguistic heritage. Smith also actively engages with the community by offering kwéyòl lessons and advocating for the recognition and appreciation of kwéyòl in various spheres, including education, arts, and social initiatives. She remains steadfast in her mission to ensure that the language and culture of Saint Lucian kwéyòl along with the other Antillean French based creoles continue to flourish, enriching the lives of present and future generations. Follow Soir online on YouTube, TikTok, and Instagram. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
29:15 4/17/24
Exploring the History and Diversity of Caribbean Sign Languages with Kris M. Ali
The Caribbean is a region of a myriad of languages, Caribbean sign languages included. In this episode, we’re joined by Caribbean sign language scholar Kris M Ali to discuss the diversity of sign languages, from the shores of Jamaica to the Bay Islands. It's not just about communication; it's a tapestry of identity, history, and resiliency. We uncover the challenges faced by lesser-known sign languages and the potential harm of a one-size-fits-all approach to language policy. Our conversation traverses the cultural significance behind these languages, the vibrant activism of local communities that has sparked change, the battles for legal recognition, and the power these languages hold in fostering rights for the Deaf community. Join us for our first discussion and stay tuned for Part II coming soon. Be sure to check out the transcript of this episode here.  Kris Ali is a PhD candidate in the department of linguistics at University of California Santa Barbara. Her research interests are broadly Caribbean languages, language documentation and description, social and linguistic justice for Caribbean people, decolonial theory, queer and trans linguistics and sign language linguistics. She uses collaborative and community-based research methods, is interested in indigenous research methodologies and follows the Caribbean tradition of liberatory linguistics in which she was trained during her first two degrees at the University of the West Indies, St Augustine. She is a trained Trinidad and Tobago Sign Language interpreter. Home for her is Trinidad and Tobago. Learn more about Kris on her website and connect with her on LinkedIn.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
35:02 4/3/24
On the Wrong Side Women's History: Judith Phillip's Role in the Colony of Grenada
There are stories we typically don't tell during Women's History Month, one of whihc is the narrative of Judith Phillip (1760-1848), an enslaver from Grenada whose family's dominion over Carriacou and Petit Martinique tells a story not just of land and wealth but race and colonial allegiances against the backdrop of the transatlantic slave trade. This episode discusses the intricacies of Caribbean history, weaving the personal story of a mixed-race family into the broader fabric of 18th-century Caribbean society.Join Strictly Facts as we uncover how Judith's French baker father and her mother, an enslaved woman, rose to prominence to own plantations and amass a fortune. We'll explore the societal structures that allowed their family to thrive in an era of oppression and how their legacy challenges our understanding of Caribbean history and power at the time. In this final episode for Women's History Month, we share the tale of inheritance, power, and the complexity of free mixed-race individuals during a time when such narratives are rarely told. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
13:39 3/20/24
The Fabric of Words: Caribbean Women Weaving History in Literature with Dr. Warren Harding
As we weave through Women's History Month and International Women's Day, the  patchwork of Caribbean women's literature takes center stage. With scholar Dr. Warren Harding, we celebrate the novels and poetry that carve out a space for the stories of Caribbean women. Our conversation turns the pages of history, culture, and activism, as Dr. Harding shares the profound influence of storytellers like Miss Lou and his own family's narratives on his Jamaican heritage and academic focus.Caribbean women's voices unfold in our discussion on the role of these writers in painting a nuanced portrait of their communities, both at home and in the diaspora. We acknowledge the diversity within these stories, showcasing how they lay the groundwork for dialogues on marginalization and resistance. Trailblazers like Makeda Silvera and Merle Hodge are brought into the spotlight, illuminating their significant contributions to the literature that serves as a beacon for revolutionary thought.The final thread of our episode examines the profound impact of Silvera on the writing and publishing industry through Sister Vision Press. We traverse the landscape of narratives that intersect with race, gender, and citizenship, celebrating how these stories from Michelle Cliff to Edwidge Danticat enrich our literary horizons. This episode is a testament to the transformative power of Caribbean literature and a heartfelt invitation to embrace these compelling voices in their own exploration of the written word.*Noted Correction: Sister Vision Press was founded in 1985.Dr. Warren Harding is an Assistant Professor of English, General Literature and Rhetoric at Binghamton University.  His work engages practices of reading, Black feminist literary and cultural criticism, and literary fieldwork in contemporary Caribbean and Afro-diasporic literary cultures. In his first monograph, tentatively titled Migratory Reading: Black Caribbean Women and the Work of Literary Cultures, he uses interviews, archival research, and close reading to study the interventions of five women: Rita Cox, Makeda Silvera, Merle Hodge, Soleida Ríos and M. NourbeSe Philip.Prior to Binghamton, he was the Diversity in Digital Publishing Postdoctoral Research Associate at Brown University Digital Publications where he supported the conceptualization, research and administration of a set of public-facing faculty digital publications that center the history and experience of oppressed or marginalized peoples. He earned his PhD in Africana Studies from Brown UniversitySupport the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
40:16 3/6/24
What's In a Name? Geography, Governance, and the Grit of National Identity
Join us as we voyage through the seas of Caribbean geography and politics as we explore the layers of history etched into nations' names and named and unnamed islands that are part of them. From twin islands like Antigua and Barbuda to archipelagos such as The Bahamas, we explore the entwined nature of geography and governance and how it shapes the cultural identity of these nations and delve into the complex political relationships that define the Caribbean narrative, including the dependencies of Carriacou and Petit Martinique to Grenada and the independence movements that have left an indelible mark on the region.Have you considered how a name can capture a multitude of stories, struggles, and triumphs? In this episode, we invite you to reflect on the tales of Antigua and Barbuda's journey to their current standing, and the impact of political status on the names and recognition of Caribbean nations. No stone is left unturned as we examine the lesser-known facts about dependencies and political autonomy within this diverse and dynamic region.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
06:25 2/21/24
Navigating the Crossroads of Law, Race, and Sovereignty in Puerto Rico with Dr. Mónica Jiménez
Join the conversation with Dr. Mónica Jiménez on Strictly Facts, where we peel back the layers of Puerto Rico's unique political situation and the heavy hand of U.S. legislative decisions on the island's fate. Through Dr.Jiménez's personal ties and her scholarly examination in her forthcoming book, Making Never, Never Land: Race and Law in the Creation of Puerto Rico, we gain an intimate glimpse into the Puerto Rico's legal status as an unincorporated territory and the systemic challenges that have been magnified by American legal precedents. As we traverse the complex terrain of Puerto Rico's status, Dr. Jiménez helps us navigate the moral dilemmas and economic strategies that have historically shaped American colonial ambition. The island's lack of federal representation and the tangible repercussions of past and present U.S. legal frameworks lead us through a reflective exploration of a legacy marred by racial and colonial practices. We confront these enduring issues head-on, casting light on the implications that reverberate through Puerto Rican society today.Mónica A. Jiménez is a poet and historian. She is currently assistant professor in the African and African Diaspora Studies Department at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research and writing explore the intersections of law, race, and empire in Latin America and the Caribbean. Her first book, Making Never-Never Land: Race and Law in the Creation of Puerto Rico, will be published in 2024 by the University of North Carolina Press. Dr. Jiménez has received fellowships in support of her work from the Institute for Citizens and Scholars (formerly the Woodrow Wilson Foundation), the Ford Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation, among others. In 2021, she was named an inaugural Letras Boricuas fellow by the Mellon and Flamboyan Arts Foundations. She holds a PhD in history from the University of Texas at Austin and a JD from the University of Texas School of Law. Her poetry and scholarly writing have appeared or are forthcoming in WSQ: Women Studies Quarterly, Latino Studies, CENTRO: Journal of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Radical History Review, NACLA Report on the Americas,  Hayden’s Ferry Review, and sx salon, among others. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
61:43 2/7/24
The History behind the Guyana-Venezuela Border Dispute
Celebrate with us as Strictly Facts hits a milestone 75th episode—our heartfelt thanks goes out to each one of you for embarking with us on this journey of enlightenment and shared knowledge. Today, we raise the curtain on the contentious and historic border dispute between Guyana and Venezuela, a saga with roots tangled deep in the colonial era and now fueled by the modern-day allure of oil. Through the lens of the December 2023 referendum and the extended history of The Guianas, we illuminate the myriad facets of this geopolitical struggle, highlighting the stakes for indigenous communities and the sovereignty of nations.Bringing context to the present, we analyze Guyana's strategic moves, including an appeal to the International Court of Justice and a call for US support, against the backdrop of Venezuela's territorial claims. Featuring insights from leaders like President Irfa Ali and regional bodies like CARICOM, we piece together a narrative that stretches beyond borders into the heart of Caribbean resilience. Join us as we untangle the complex interplay of history, diplomacy, and emerging oil interests in a Caribbean story that continues to shape the future of an entire region.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
15:08 1/24/24
Embracing Our Legacy and Honoring Ancestral Wisdom: Reflections on Another Year of Strictly Facts
The echoes of Caribbean carnivals, the rhythm of calypso, and the wisdom of our elders - these are the threads that weave the rich tapestry of our heritage. As I navigated the bittersweet waves of personal loss this holiday season, I was reminded just how vital it is to preserve the legacy of our ancestors. This brief but poignant episode is a reflection on the journey of Strictly Facts, our growth through the podcasting world, and the challenges faced in education during an unprecedented global pandemic. It's an intimate look back at the last few years, with a forward gaze filled with hope and determination.We're celebrating three years of Strictly Facts with heartfelt gratitude, acknowledging the unwavering support from our listeners who have become family. I take you through the personal stories that fuel my passion for Caribbean history and share latest updates moving forward. Join me, Alexandra Miller, as we continue to empower, elevate, and unify through the stories of our past, and stride into a year of abundance and shared narratives.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
05:20 1/10/24
Caribbean Footprints: Tracing Jamaican Influence in American Culture through the Life of Martha Gayle with Damion R. Evans
The Caribbean influence in the United States is undeniable, especially in states like New York. In this episode, guest Damion R. Evans helps illuminate this story through the engrossing life story of Ms. Martha Gayle, a Jamaican immigrant who journeyed to the US almost a century ago. He'll also be sharing his experiences of discovering Gayle's remarkable collection compiled by Jamaican Demar Ludford, and enlighten us about the impact of Caribbean immigrants on the American society and culture.You'll learn about Gayle, who braved her way through the early twentieth century U.S. and found her footing in the domestic workforce, eventually evolving into a landlady in Bed-Stuy. You'll also hear about the effects of World Wars and Civil Rights Movement on Gayle's mindset, and how she turned struggles into triumphs. Our conversation with Damion not only probes into Gayle's personal life, but also expands to the broader perspective of Caribbean migration. Finally, we urge listeners to understand the significance of Caribbean history and the need for its better representation in mainstream media. This episode is not just a conversation; it's a revelation that uncovers the resilience and influence of Jamaican immigrants in shaping the US.Damion R. Evans is a doctoral candidate in World History at St. John’s University in New York City. Damion is originally from Jamaica and is now a soldier with 20 years of experience in the US Army. Throughout his military career, he has had multiple deployments to Iraq, Afghanistan, Central Asia, and Europe. His research interest includes West Indian Immigration, as well as the region’s cultural and colonial history. Currently, his doctoral dissertation analyzes how the life of Martha Gayle exemplifies the Jamaican immigrant experience which furthers the conversation on the perceptions of black identity and culture in the United States.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
45:53 12/13/23
Framing Culture through Caribbean Cinema with Klieon John
In this episode, Klieon John, founder of Twin Island Cinema, joins Strictly Facts as we shed  light on the pivotal role Caribbean films have played in shaping the region's vibrant culture and history. Expect a deep dive into the evolution of Caribbean cinema, from the early days of foreign influence to the emergence of globally recognized works like "BIM" and "Rockers." Klieon shares his personal experiences, painting a vivid picture of the creativity, resilience, and passion that are the bedrock of Caribbean filmmaking. From capturing moments of monumental change, like independence movements, to blending diverse genres, every bit of Caribbean life finds its way onto the silver screen. The discussion also explores how technology has been harnessed to propel Caribbean cinema into the global spotlight. We address the challenges facing Caribbean cinema, such as inadequate representation in mainstream media and the hurdles in accessing these films. Klieon provides invaluable advice to aspiring filmmakers and offers insights into his latest ventures in indigenous filmmaking. So tune in, as we traverse the captivating landscape of Caribbean cinema and celebrate its vital role in our culture.With over 14 years of experience in the media industry, Klieon John is a seasoned Caribbean writer, filmmaker and creative director who has worked in public relations, advertising and brand development for international and regional companies and agencies across several Caribbean territories including St. Kitts, Jamaica and Trinidad. Klieon has produced a number of commercials, shorts, creative and non-fiction projects featuring cultural and environmental content in partnership with medium to large scale organisations throughout the region. Follow and support Klieon on Patreon, The Nieuwe Native audio journal on the on-going process behind his Tilting Axis Fellowship, and on social media @twinislandcinema and @byklieonjohn. You can also subscribe to the Twin Island Cinema Newsletter to learn more about grants, festivals, events,  new releases etc happening in the region.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
52:30 11/29/23
Citizenship through Education and Imperialism in the Dominican Republic with Dr. Alexa Rodriguez
We're thrilled to have Dr. Alexa Rodriguez join us for a deeply engaging discussion through the Dominican Republic's educational history. With her unique insights developed through her Dominican heritage and academic background, Dr. Rodriguez deftly unveils the obscured narratives of education under the shadow of US imperialism. Ever wondered how external forces shape the landscapes of native education systems? Here's your chance to delve into the fascinating, yet lesser-known saga of the Dominican Republic's struggle for educational autonomy during the eight-year US occupation (1916-1924) and beyond.As we venture deeper into the heart of the Dominican Republic, prepare to be moved by the resolute spirit of local communities, their tireless efforts to establish and maintain schools, and their unwavering advocacy for their children's right to respect and education. Dr. Rodriguez masterfully guides us through the evolution of education in the Dominican Republic, from the disheartening defunding of schools during the US intervention, to the effects of the Trujillo dictatorship, and the current-day challenges facing Dominican education. Through this eye-opening dialogue, we aim not just to revisit the past, but also to instigate a broader conversation about education's critical role in shaping a nation's future. If you're curious about history, education, or the complex interplay between the two, this episode is one you won't want to miss.Alexa Rodríguez is an assistant professor of education and a faculty affiliate for the Center for Race and Public Education in the South at EHD as well as at the Edmund W. Gordon Institute for Urban and Minority Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research examines schools, migration, and the formation of racial and national identities in both Latin America and in the United States. She is currently working on a book manuscript, "Crafting Dominicanidad" (forthcoming with University of North Carolina Press), an intellectual history that examines how Dominicans used public schools to articulate and circulate competing notions of racial, class, and national identity during the early twentieth century. Her work has been published in History of Education, History of Education Quarterly, Latino Studies, Caribbean Studies, City & State New York, Clio and the Contemporary, and the blog of the History of Education Society in the UK.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
39:31 11/15/23
Education and Empire: Schooling, Colonialism, and Migration, in Britain and the British Caribbean with Deanna Lyncook
Education shapes lives - but how is this journey shaped by race, colonialism, and migration? Join us as we navigate the establishment of school systems in the British Caribbean post-Emancipation to the increasingly diverse classrooms of mid-20th century Britain. We're enlightened by the insights of Deanna Lyncook, a fellow podcaster and PhD student, whose research colors our understanding of Caribbean life and education abroad.We trace the racial and religious underpinnings of education in the anglophone colonies and unpack the challenges that newly-migrated British Caribbean students faced in the UK, from policies that hindered their academic success to the resistance and activism that these hurdles sparked within the Caribbean community. We also spotlight the unsung heroes: parents, educators, and activists who fought for an improved educational experience for Caribbean youth in Britain. Their story, alongside the enduring challenges faced by these students, continues to resonate today. In a world increasingly shaped by movement, understanding the interplay between education, history, and migration is more crucial than ever. Join us as we unearth an essential chapter of Black British and Caribbean history. Deanna Lyncook is a PhD student in History at Queen Mary University of London. Her research takes a transnational approach to the experiences of West Indian children in the British education system in Britain and its Caribbean colonies, in the second half of the 20th Century. She is the founder host of the weekly podcast The History Hotline where she discusses events and individuals that have shaped Black history in Britain and the Caribbean. She co-organised a Black British History Conference funded by the Institute of Historical Research, Queen Mary University and Northwestern University. She has curated an oral history exhibition at the Museum of Methodism and has also worked on historical research projects for the Society for Caribbean Studies, the University of Leeds, BBC Radio London and the Times Radio. She is also a coordinator for the Young Historians Project, that works on research projects to document neglected aspects of Black British History. Follow Deanna on Instagram and Twitter and The History Hotline on Instagram and Twitter. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
54:08 11/1/23
Turtle Soup, Maritime Boundaries, andTurtlemen in the Cayman Islands: An Environmental Odyssey with Dr. Sharika Crawford
Our guest, award-winning author and U.S. Naval Academy professor, Dr. Sharika Crawford,  takes us on a historical journey to the heart of the Cayman Islands, unearthing the complex relationship between the environmental landscape and the Islands; inhabitants through turtle soup. Together, we traverse the Cayman's fascinating evolution, from the aftermath of slave emancipation to the rise and subsequent fall of the turtle hunting industry. Venture with us as we uncover the dynamics between the Caymanian sea turtle hunters and the British government, the Islands' two-tier racial hierarchy and its lasting implications on labor even today, and the repercussions of the environmental movement in the 20th century, focusing on conservation policies and their significant impact on Caymanian communities. Join us as we illuminate the often-overlooked role of the Cayman Islands' turtle hunters in the broader Caribbean narrative and global food consumption.Sharika Crawford is Professor of History at the United States naval Academy in Annapolis. In spring 2023, she was named the inaugural Speedwell Professor of International Studies, an honor she will hold until 2028. Crawford's primary research focuses on modern Latin America, specifically, Colombia and the interstitial places in the circum-Caribbean like the Archipelago of San Andrés and Providencia and the Cayman Islands. Her first monograph The Last Turtlemen of the Caribbean: Waterscapes of Labor, Conservation, and Boundary Making published by the University of North Carolina Press received an Honorable Mention from the Elsa Goveia Prize in Caribbean History Committee of the Association of Caribbean Historians in 2021. It has been widely reviewed in national and international venues. Additionally, Crawford has published articles and essays in the Global South, Historia Critica, International Journal of Maritime History, Latin American Research Review, and the New West Indian Guide/Nieuwe West-Indische Gids. Dr. Crawford has also received several prestigious grants and fellowships from the American Philosophical Society, the Fulbright U.S. Program, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and most recently, the Digital Library of the CaribbeSupport the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
65:34 10/18/23
Cuban Domestic Labor: A Complex History Unearthed with Dr Anasa Hicks
As we continue to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, this episode promises to enlighten you with a deep dive into the complexities of Cuba's domestic labor history, guided by the expert insights of our guest, Dr Anasa Hicks, Associate Professor of History at Florida State University. We journey together through the significant shifts of the 20th century, examining the enduring ties of domestic service to the history of slavery, the gendered and class structures of domestic labor, and the changing perceptions of these roles in society. From the turbulent era of the 1933 Revolution to the radical activism era between 1938 and 1959, we delve into the intricate narratives that have shaped the future of domestic service in Cuba. Hear the story of Elvira Rodriguez, a domestic servant and activist whose story embodies the power of workers' activism in Cuba. This is more than just a history lesson; it's an exploration of the power of activism and the complexities of labor history in Cuba. Tune in for a captivating and enlightening conversation.Anasa Hicks is Associate Professor of Caribbean History at Florida State University. Her research focuses on race, gender, and labor in 20th-century Cuba. Her first book, "Hierarchies at Home: Domestic Service in Cuba from Abolition to Revolution" was published by Cambridge University Press in 2022. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
34:33 10/4/23
Exploring Black Women's Impact in Early 20th-Century Cuba with Dr. Takkara Brunson
Have you ever wondered what Cuba was like before the 1959 Revolution? This fascinating episode promises to take you there. Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with us as we are joined by Dr. Takkara Brunson for a riveting exploration of the Republic of Cuba period (1902-1958) through the lens of Black Cuban women. We unravel their significant contributions to the independence movement despite the racialized and gendered dynamics that pervaded their society.The evolution of Black women's activism in this era is a narrative of transformative power. Learn how their discourse gradually shifted from respectability to a critique of racism, sexism, and classism. Understand how they leveraged their political clout to form independent organizations and, surprisingly, how Black civic clubs became their gateway to patronage networks. We also highlight inspiring figures like  María Dámasa Jova Baró authored a and Inocencia Valdés’s commit, who used their voices and actions to make a tangible difference in their communities. This episode is a testament to the resilience and undying spirit of Black women in Cuba.Takkara Brunson is Associate Professor of History at Texas A&M University. Her research focuses on political and cultural traditions of the African Diaspora, with emphasis on how Black women have shaped Latin American and Caribbean societies after slave abolition. She is the author of Black Women, Citizenship, and the Making of Modern Cuba, which was co-awarded the Letitia Woods Brown Book Prize for African American Women's History. Brunson’s research has appeared in Gender & History, Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism, and Cuban Studies, among other places. Her research has been supported by the Institute for Citizens and Scholars (formerly the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation), University of Rochester Frederick Douglass Institute, Ford Foundation, and UNCF/Mellon Programs.  She received her Ph.D. in Latin American History at the University of Texas at Austin and B.A. in Comparative Women’s Studies at Spelman College. Follow Dr. Brunson on Twitter.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
38:07 9/20/23
Considering Caribbean Students' Experiences with Dr. Emmanuela Stanislaus
Learning as a Caribbean person doesn't stop with understanding our history. In this episode, Dr. Emmanuela Stanislaus joins us for a discussion on the challenges of being educated outside of the region and how students can seek support and resources as they pursue their education. Dr. Emmanuela is an author, podcaster, consultant, and founder of Dr. Emmanuela Consulting. She finished her doctorate in Higher Education Administration in four years while balancing a demanding full time leadership role and a busy lifestyle. She founded Dr. Emmanuela Consulting where she supports women of color graduate students taking them from overwhelmed, isolated, and scared to clear, supported, and confident through the Writing on My Mind podcast, career and doctoral coaching, and speaking engagements. Dr. Emmanuela has also authored Taking Charge: A Career Guide for Graduate Students and is a contributor to Our Doctoral Journey Book: A Collection of Black Women's Experiences. Follow Dr. Emmanuela on Instagram and LinkedIn. Check out my episode on Dr. Emmanuela's podcast here. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
44:17 9/6/23
A Brief History on Caribbean Myths, Legends, and Folklore with Amanda Alcántara
Did you grow up hearing chilling stories of duppies and jumbies? Have you ever thought about what these tales and legends mean for Caribbean history and culture? In this episode, Amanda Alcántar joins us to do just that as we explore the impact of Caribbean folklore on our past and uphold their importance, particularly for Black and Brown communities. Amanda Alcántara is a Caribbean writer, journalist, and voice actor. Also known artistically as Ama Rey, Amanda is the author of Chula and How I Became a Mermaid. Her work has been featured in the anthology “Latinas: Struggles & Protests in 21st Century USA,” the poetry anthology “LatiNext,” Rolling Stone, The Huffington Post, Latino USA, Remezcla, and other publications. She is also a co-founder and previous editor of La Galería Magazine. In 2021, Alcántara began voicing audiobooks in English and Spanish, starting with providing the voiceover for the Spanish translation of The Hill We Climb by Amanda Gorman. She recently won an Earphones award for her narration of Pilar Ramirez and the Escape from Zafa by Julian Randall. Ama is also the host of the Spanish-language podcast, Radio Místico. Follow Amanda on Twitter and Instagram. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
40:06 8/23/23
Six Moments in Jamaican Sports Her-story for Sixty-one Years of Independence
One of my favorite parts of Caribbean culture is how we rally our islands and show our regional pride for our sports teams. In honor of Jamaica celebrating 61 years of independence and Jamaica's Reggae Girls making women's football history, I'm sharing six of my favorite Jamaican women's sports moments of all time. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
07:25 8/9/23
Strictly Facts' Scary Caribbean Travel Spots
Are there any Caribbean places that give you the creeps? Join us as we continue our summer travel list, this time sharing some of the top spots for hair-raising Caribbean history for your summer adventures. Be sure to let us know on social media if you plan on visiting any of these sites this summer!Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
08:31 7/26/23
Strictly Facts' Summer World Heritage Sites Recommendations
Looking for somewhere new to travel to this summer while still learning something new about the region? Check out our recommendations for some of UNESCO's well-preserved World Heritage Sites in the Caribbean, where history, culture, nature, biodiversity, and legacy all come together. See the full list of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites here. Be sure to let us know on social media if you plan on visiting any of these sites this summer!Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
08:57 7/12/23
A Brief History of GraceKennedy Ltd. in 20th Century Jamaica with Fred W. Kennedy
There are few Caribbean-owned businesses that have withstood the test of time like GraceKennedy Ltd. has for over one century. In this episode Fred W. Kennedy, grandson of one of the original co-founders, joins Strictly  Facts to discuss his family's legacy with the company from the viewpoint of his father, Luis Fred Kennedy, who led the major conglomerate for over 50 years through pre- and post-independence Jamaica, the subject of our guest's new book Firstborn: The Life of Luis Fred Kennedy 1908-1982.  Fred W. Kennedy was born and raised in Jamaica. He holds a Bachelor of Arts and Graduate Diploma in Education from the University of the West Indies (UWI) and a Master and Doctor of Education from the University of Toronto. After thirty years of serving as an educator and principal, Fred turned to writing Jamaican historical fiction. He is the author of Daddy Sharpe (2008) (the story of Jamaica’s National Hero, Samuel Sharpe) and Huareo (2015) (the story of a Jamaican Taino cacique). Firstborn is his first published work of nonfiction. He wrote his father’s biography “to celebrate the relationship of love and trust that we shared” and as “a tribute to him in praise of his contributions to the national development of Jamaica.” Fred remains connected to the company as Chairman of the GraceKennedy Foundation, which funds educational, environmental and health initiatives in Jamaica.  His interests and hobbies include Caribbean history and literature, cycling, tennis, travelling, boating and fishing. He and his wife Georgianne share their time between his native Jamaica and adopted Canada, where their three daughters and families reside.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
47:47 6/28/23
Caribbean Music, History and Social Justice with Dr. Danielle Brown
Celebrate Caribbean-American Heritage Month and Black Music Month with Strictly Facts this June as Dr. Danielle Brown joins the show for a discussion on Caribbean music and its capacity for influencing education and building social change that spans from the shores of Trinidad and Tobago, with a brief history of Parang, to the Caribbean diaspora. Danielle Brown, Ph.D. is a multi-disciplinary artist-scholar and entrepreneur. She is the Founder and CEO of My People Tell Stories, LLC, a company based on the premise that people of color in particular, and marginalized people in general, need to tell and interpret their own stories. Brown is the author of the music-centered ethnographic memoir, East of Flatbush, North of Love: An Ethnography of Home, and the companion Teacher Guidebook. Brown advocates for social justice in music and uses the arts to educate people on the history and culture of the Caribbean and African diaspora at large. For more information, visit: www.mypeopletellstories.com.  Follow Danielle on Instagram and Facebook. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
39:36 6/14/23
The History of Conflict between Haiti and the Dominican Republic Part II: Dominican Statelessness with Dr. Amarilys Estrella and Activist Ana María Belique
As a continuation of our last episode, Dr. Amarilys Estrella and Ana Maria Belique join for a discussion on anti-Haitian sentiment in the Dominican Republic. Together, we discuss how the Dominican government has legitimized some of the conflict through state documentation, leaving generations of Dominicans and Dominicans of Haitian descent stateless  due to the 2013 Ruling 168/13.  Amarilys Estrella is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and a faculty affiliate for the Center for African and African American Studies at Rice University. Her research interests broadly focus on the intersections of race and gender within transnational movements, Black Latin American and Latinx identity, as well as human rights and anti-racist activism. Her first book project investigates how Blackness and Black identity, is produced, employed and transformed through everyday encounters among stateless Black grassroots activists of Haitian descent in the Dominican Republic. In her article, “Muertos Civiles: Mourning the Casualties of Racism in the Dominican Republic” she examines mourning as a practice of resistance within anti-racist movements.Ana María Belique is a founding member and leader of Reconoci. do, a movement that mobilizes and empowers Dominicans of Haitian descent and campaigns for equality and citizenship rights. She studied Sociology and specializes in Afro-Latin American and Caribbean studies from CLACSO. Her activism focuses on the fight for the restitution of the right to nationality of Dominicans of Haitian descent affected by ruling 168-13 of the Dominican Constitutional Court, as well as promoting the empowerment of the Dominican population of Haitian descent residing in Dominican bateyes. In addition, she founded the initiative for women and girls, MUÑECAS NEGRAS RD initiative, which offers a learning space to break the patterns imposed on black Dominican women. She coordinated the publication of two books, Nos Cambió La Vida (Our Transformed Lives) and "Somos Quien Somos," which document the stories of members of the Reconoci. do. She recently coordinated the Critical Training Space for Dominicans of Haitian descent. Ana María Belique has visited various international academic spaces where she talks about the reality of Dominicans of Haitian descent in the DR, human rights, Afro-descendants, and the experience of working with women in the bateyes. She was a visiting student at Columbia University in the Human Rights Advocacy Program 2022-2023 cohort.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
59:59 5/31/23
The History of Conflict between Haiti and the Dominican Republic Part I
Join Strictly Facts as we celebrate Haitian Heritage Month with new episodes on Haitian history. This week we're sharing a brief history of the longstanding racial conflict between Haiti and the Dominican Republic to followed up by an extensive conversation on present-day anti-Haitian sentiment in our next episode. Stay tuned!Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
10:26 5/17/23
The History of Trade and Trade Law in the Caribbean with Alicia Nicholls
The Caribbean has been an epicenter of global trade since the birth of colonialism. In this episode, international trade specialist Alicia Nicholls joins us for a discussion about both how the region has shaped and is being shaped by trade across the world. Alicia Nicholls is an international trade consultant with over a decade of experience providing bespoke trade research and advisory services to a variety of clients.   Miss Nicholls is the founder of the Caribbean’s leading trade policy and development blog, www.caribbeantradelaw.com, since 2011. She also presents regularly at both regional and international academic and industry-related conferences and webinars. Her primary research interests are foreign investment law/policy, global financial regulation and international business.  She is currently a research fellow and part-time lecturer with the University of the West Indies and also lectures part-time in the political economy of international trade and finance in The UWI Cave Hill’s Department of Government, Sociology, Social Work and Psychology.Miss Nicholls’ multidisciplinary background includes a Bachelor of Science in Political Science with First Class Honours, a Master of Science in International Trade Policy with Distinction and a Bachelor of Laws with Upper Second Class Honours from The University of the West Indies. She also holds the prestigious FITT Diploma in International Trade from the Ontario, Canada-based Forum for International Trade Training (FITT). She attained the Post-Graduate Certificate in University Teaching and Learning (PGCUTL) from The UWI in July 2022. Follow Alicia Nicholls on Twitter and LinkedIn. CBERA - Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery ActCSME - CARICOM Single Market and Economy WHO - World Trade OrganizationSupport the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
45:57 5/3/23
The History of Grenada's Spicemas with Christell Simeon
No island's carnival is exactly the same - take for instance, Grenada's Spicemas. Christell Simeon joins Strictly Facts to discuss the history and unique culture that Spicemas and Grenada offer the world each August.   Christell Simeon is a Grenadian from the parish of St. David. Christell is a former educator of Caribbean history at the Presentation Brothers College (2005-2013). Christell is an SGU Alumni with a BSC in Business management with highest honors (Summa Cum Laude) from 2007 to 2011. Christell holds a Masters in Public Administration from the University of Regina, Canada (2013-2016). Christell is the owner of Spice Island DigiContent, a registered business in Grenada in the Creative and Cultural industry that also operates  Island Learning Grenada. Follow Island Learning Grenada on Instagram and Facebook. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
33:54 4/19/23
A Brief History of Jamaica's Kendal Railway Tragedy with Beverley East
More than sixty years ago, on September 1, 1957, over 1600 lives were lost and generations of families were impacted when a train derailed on its way to Kingston after leaving Montego Bay. Writer and leading handwriting expert Beverley East joins Strictly Facts to share the story of the Kendal Railway Tragedy, its impact on her own family, and how and what inspired her to write Reaper of Souls, a historical novel about what was then the second worst rail disaster in history at the time. Ms. Beverley East CAM, MGA, CFDE, has been a guest at several major literary festivals. Mainly the international Calabash Literary Festival in St Elizabeth Jamaica she read twice in 2008 and in 2014. Other literary festivals include Guadeloupe, Dominica, Nigeria, London and USA. She has sat on literary panels at the Library of Congress, World Bank and the House of Commons. She was a fellow for the Virginia Centre for the Creative Arts (VCCA ) and Calabash literary festival. She created the Writer’s Lounge in 2007 where she has guided many authors on their journey to writing and publishing. Ms. East has participated in several anthologies and currently sits on the Board of the Hurston Wright Foundation.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
34:13 4/5/23
Review Session: Caribbean Feminisms
Did you enjoy our last episode for Women's History Month? Take a quick listen to this special Review Session as host, Alexandria Miller, explores some of her key takeaways and offers several recommendations on scholars, activists, and even books to check out if you're interested in learning more about Caribbean Feminisms. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
07:51 3/22/23
A Brief History of Women's History and Feminisms in the Caribbean with Sarah-Anne Gresham
Happy Women's History Month and International Women's Day! In honor of all Caribbean bad gyals at home and in the diaspora, Sarah-anne Gresham joins us for a discussion on Caribbean Feminisms and the ways Caribbean women have challenged oppressions and campaigned for their rights and the rights of others. Sarah-Anne Gresham is the co-founder of Intersect Antigua which is a Queeribbean feminist collective of stories, art, and teach-ins on gender justice. Sarah was a recipient of a Fulbright scholarship in 2018 and received a Master of Arts degree in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies from George Washington University in the spring of 2020. She graduated as a Columbian College of Arts and Sciences “Graduate  Distinguished Scholar” in recognition of her work as a graduate research specialist and communications assistant, as well as her master’s thesis on feminist historiography and literary theory. She is now a third-year doctoral student and teaching assistant at Rutgers University with research interests in Black/Caribbean feminist thought, affect theory, comparative racialization, and Japanese anime. Her work as a teaching assistant to undergraduate students is rooted in understanding and critiquing limited liberal feminist paradigms of “equality” with men. Rather than seeking inclusion, equality, or reforms within systems and categories that perpetuate harm, she agitates for abolition and transformative justice and for dismantling, in the words of bell hooks, “white supremacist capitalist patriarchy.” Follow Sarah on Instagram and follow Intersect Antigua on Instagram and Twitter. *Minor Correction: The Sixteen Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence are November 25 (International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women) to December 10, Human Rights Day. Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
48:28 3/8/23
Consequences of the Environment on Caribbean Education with Dr. Jessica S. Samuel
The environment plays a tremendous role in the Caribbean's growth and development. How often, though, do we consider its impact on education? In this episode, Dr. Jessica S. Samuel joins for a discussion on educational equity and the environment, with a special focus on the US Virgin Islands and the hidden racial  ramifications of environmental conservation on learning in St. John. Dr. Jessica S. Samuel is the founder and CEO of Radical Education & Advocacy League, LLC (REAL) an educational equity firm focused on improving BIPOC student outcomes. An Afro-Caribbean woman, Dr. Samuel was born and raised in the U.S. Virgin Islands with roots throughout the wider Caribbean. She is an educator, interdisciplinary scholar, and decolonial activist who studies race, education, colonialism and the environment, including where they all converge in the United States and Caribbean. Dr. Samuel’s research has been supported by the Mellon Foundation, Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, and Social Science Research Council. She holds a PhD in American Studies from Boston University, a Master of Education from the University of Missouri-St. Louis, and a Bachelor in African American Studies and Anthropology from Wesleyan University. Dr. Samuel is also a proud alumna of Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, Teach for America, and the Institute for the Recruitment of Teachers. Follow Dr. Samuel on Instagram here.Support the showConnect with Strictly Facts - Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube Looking to read more about the topics covered in this episode? Subscribe to the newsletter at www.strictlyfactspod.com to get the Strictly Facts Syllabus to your email!Want to Support Strictly Facts? Rate the Show Leave a review on your favorite podcast platform Share this episode with someone who loves Caribbean history and culture Send us a DM or voice note to have your thoughts featured on an upcoming episode Share the episode on social media and tag us Donate to help us continue empowering listeners with Caribbean history and education Produced by Breadfruit Media
52:28 2/22/23

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