Show cover of Paw'd Defiance

Paw'd Defiance

Welcome to Paw'd Defiance, where we don't lecture but we do educate. This podcast comes to you from the University of Washington Tacoma. Our show is about more than campus. During each episode we'll highlight a different person, program, area of research or educational topic that is relevant not only to the university but also to the Greater Tacoma community and beyond.

Tracks

A Deep Dive into Student Success
In this episode of the podcast we're joined by UW Tacoma Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Success, Bonnie Becker, and Senior Director, Student Transitions and Success, Amanda Figueroa. You may have already guessed (judging by their titles) that Becker and Figueroa do a lot of work around student success. We'll talk about what we mean when we say "student success." We'll also get into why college is important to individuals and to society. Research suggests that having a college degree impacts everything from social mobility to health. Becker and Figueroa will also outline UW Tacoma's revamped approach to student success including the importance of HIPs (no, not the thing connect to your torso). Resources & Programs for students:First Generation InitiativesOffice of Student Advocacy & SupportTeaching & Learning Centers
60:14 8/11/23
Mental Health and AAPI Communities
In this episode, we talk about Tacoma's Asia Pacific Cultural Center. We talk about the history of the Center and its role in the community. We also talk about mental health in Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. 
19:43 6/27/23
A Letter to Her Future Self
In this episode, Class of 2023 grad Angel Reddy reads from a letter she wrote to her future self. In the letter, The letter talks about her experience at UW Tacoma and includes a list of what she wants for her future self. Reddy's parents came to the United States from Fiji. They settled in Lakewood and ran their own business. Reddy and her older brother grew up in the area. 
08:12 6/8/23
BFFs Forever
Jai'Shon Berry and Exita Lealofi met four years ago at UW Tacoma. They didn't quite hit it off, but they did eventually become best friends. In this episode, Berry and Lealofi talk about why they're friends. They also talk about the importance of their friendship and how it helped them deal with the stress of college and with outside stress including break ups and family emergencies. 
19:30 6/7/23
A Cohort of Sisters: Part II
Dr. Ronee K Wopsock Pawwinee recently completed her doctoral degree in educational leadership at UW Tacoma. Wopsock Pawwinee is one of 10 members of the inaugural Muckleshoot Cohort. She talks about her experience in the program, including her ups and downs as well as the connections she made to other members of the cohort. Wopsock Pawwinee also discusses the role of education in her life as well as how she plans to use her degree to help her tribe. 
40:25 6/5/23
A Cohort of Sisters: Part I
Born in Fiji, Amy Maharaj lived through a coup on the island. Maharaj and her family eventually resettled in Canada. Maharaj initially struggled in school but overcame those struggles to earn a bachelor's, master's, and recently, a doctoral degree. In this episode Maharaj talks about her life and her experience in the Muckleshoot Ed.D. program. The cohort is a partnership between the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe and UW Tacoma. The first cohort is set to officially graduate on June 9. 
18:29 6/2/23
The Milgard Women's Initiative
The Milgard Women's Initiative in the Milgard School of Business at UW Tacoma works to advance women as leaders. The program does this in a number of ways, including through workshops and guest lectures. The biggest impact MWI has is through its mentorship program that connects students to community leaders. In this episode we talk about the program with Rachel Vaughn, Executive Director of the Center for Leadership & Social Responsibility in the Milgard School of Business, Sarah Kendall, former Vice President, Corporate Affairs and Sustainability at Weyerhaeuser Company, and UW Tacoma alumna Marion LaRocque.
40:25 5/19/23
A Feeling of Peace
In this episode UW Tacoma alumna Raihab Baig talks about her experience with Ramadan. Baig is Muslim and actively practices her faith. She talks about her connection to Islam as well as her relatively recent decision to start wearing a hijab. Baig also discusses what Ramadan means to her and how fasting helps her focus on things that really matter to her.
23:26 4/21/23
Smelling Skulls & Licking Eye Infections
SIAS Dean Natalie Eschenbaum studies disgust, specifically disgust in early modern English literature.  In this episode, we hear about poems that feature maggots and eye infections. The poems are gross and important. We'll talk about the role of disgust in these poems and in other works. We'll also talk about the role of disgust in our lives including why a lack of disgust might be a sign of love. Finally, Eschenbaum tells us why disgust as an area of study has become popular in recent years.
31:31 4/14/23
Working at Home
UW Tacoma Associate Professor Danica Miller and UW Tacoma Assistant Professor Sara Eccleston are both members of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians. UW Tacoma is situated on the ancestral homeland of the Puyallup. In this episode, Miller and Eccleston talk about the role of education in their lives. For both women, education didn't just happened in the classroom, it also happened in their community. The pair also discuss the challenges they've faced as Indigenous women in higher education. Finally, Miller and Eccleston talk about what colleges and universities need to do to attract and retain Native and Indigenous students.
52:26 4/13/23
Reliving the Dead
In this episode, a conversation about death with UW Tacoma Assistant Teaching Professor Sarah A. Chavez. Chavez studies the performative aspects of death, namely the elegy, eulogy and obituary.  During the episode, Chavez talks about how she got interested in these forms, why they're important and the attributes of each. She also discusses what makes a "good" elegy, eulogy or obituary. Finally, Chavez ponders how she would like to be celebrated after she passes. 
34:29 3/29/23
Rock of Ages Part II
Part II of our behind-the-scenes look at the process of bringing Rock of Ages to the stage. In this mini-episode we hear from four UW Tacoma students who have roles in the show. The group talk about their experience as well as their interest in performing. 
06:54 3/15/23
Rock of Ages
Get ready to rock! In this episode we go behind the scenes of "Rock of Ages." UW Tacoma's theater program and the Tacoma Little Theatre  collaborated to bring the jukebox musical to the local stage. The show's director Maria-Tania Bandes Becerra Weingarden as well as the show's musical director Kim Davenport, agreed to record a series of audio diaries from the first week of rehearsal to the last. The pair discuss the ups and downs of putting together a large-scale musical. They talk about everything from COVID to forgetting to block a scene to stripper poles. 
40:10 3/9/23
Filling the Cup
In this episode we talk with a group of five UW Tacoma alumni. The five work at Tacoma's Multicultural Child and Family Hope Center. The center provides a range of services including early learning and childcare. The group talks about what drew them to the work. They also talk about the ups and downs of the job. Finally, the five discuss the impact education had on their lives.
29:11 2/28/23
Peace & Patience
Annie Nguyen's parents fled Vietnam in 1975 and ultimately ended up living in Alabama. Growing up, Nguyen says she tried hard to fit in with everyone around her, and that meant suppressing her Vietnamese heritage. In this episode, Nguyen reads from an essay where she talks about embracing her heritage including learning how to celebrate the Lunar New Year. 
12:51 1/26/23
Indigenous Identity & The Natural World
UW Tacoma Associate Professor Michelle Montgomery joins us in this episode of the podcast. Montgomery is here to talk about the book, "Re-Indigenizing Ecological Consciousness and The Interconnectedness To Indigenous Identities." Montgomery served as the book's editor. The book contains a number of essays written by Indigenous scholars. The authors write about different topics including Indigenous identity, nature, history and decolonizing education. We'll talk about the book and the process of putting it together. We also talk with what it means to decolonize education. Finally, Montgomery discusses her work with the School of Education's Muckleshoot Ed.D. cohort. That cohort is scheduled to complete their doctoral degrees in the spring. More information about the Indigenous Speaker Series. 
29:44 1/25/23
Building Worlds & Community
UW Tacoma alumnus Peter Jung uses the board game Dungeons & Dragons to connect with neurodivergent kids. Jung was bullied as a kid and often felt isolated. He says gaming changed his life and helped him find a community. Jung is autistic and sees games, especially D & D as a great way to help build skills and relationships. 
47:12 1/3/23
Behind the Mic
KNKX News Director Florangela Davila stopped by the studio to talk about her experience in the news industry. Davila and the KNKX team recently launched an eight-part podcast series called "The Walk Home." The series details the life and death of Manny Ellis, a Tacoma man who died in police custody in 2020. We'll talk about the podcast, we'll also talk about the push to tell a more diverse range of stories as well as  the challenges of reporting the news. Finally, we discuss the future of journalism as well as what students need to do to prepare themselves for a career in the industry.
45:12 10/12/22
Students Helping Students Succeed
Welcome to Paw’d Defiance where we don’t lecture but we do educate. I’m Eric Wilson-Edge. In this episode we hear from UW Tacoma Advisor Isabella Webb. Besides advising students, Webb runs the Husky Success Series which helps new students connect to campus. We’ll also hear from three UW Tacoma students who are part of the Husky Success Series. Eliza Gines, Kara Peterson and Jake Detert will talk about their experience in college, including their choice of major and challenges they’ve faced. They’ll also share some words of wisdom for future students. 
18:42 9/28/22
Indigenous Motherhood in the Academy
UW Tacoma Associate Professor and Ed.D. Director Robin Zape-tah-hol-ah Minthorn has collaborated on a new book called "Indigenous Motherhood in the Academy." The book is a collection of short essays written by Indigenous mothers who work in higher education. The stories from these mothers are honest, and at times, difficult. We'll talk about the book, the process of putting it together as well as the challenges facing Indigenous mothers in academia. We'll also talk about the process of writing a book during the pandemic as well as the pandemic's impact the contributors personal and professional lives.Muckleshoot cohort:https://www.tacoma.uw.edu/soe/EdD/muckleshoot-cohort
32:55 9/23/22
Being Themself
UW Tacoma Assistant Professor Vern Harner recently completed their doctorate in social welfare and will begin teaching on campus this fall. In this episode Harner talks about their interest in social work. They also discuss the importance of having trans researchers conduct  research about the trans community. Harner is trans and played an important role in getting the University of Washington to change its diploma name policy. Until recently the university only allowed full legal names on diplomas. Harner got involved with the issue after a few of their trans students expressed concern about the policy.  We'll talk about that and Harner's long history of activism.School of Social Work & Criminal Justice CEI
55:35 9/2/22
A Sense of Being Other
Isabella Webb was born and raised in Australia. For years she tried to hide her Aboriginal heritage. In this episode, Webb talks about how higher education and travel helped her embrace her heritage. Webb earned a bachelor's, master's and is currently working on a doctorate. We also discuss Aboriginal history including the Australian government's attempt to eradicate the Aboriginal way of life. Finally, Webb talks about her role as an academic advisor including how she empowers students to embrace their journey and succeed in college.
30:15 8/22/22
Mass Shootings and the United States
UW Tacoma Associate Professor Eric Madfis is an expert on mass shootings and has been quoted in numerous publications including the New York Times, Politico and the Washington Post. Madfis has also written four books about mass shootings. His latest book “All American Massacre: The Tragic Role of American Culture and Society in Mass Shootings” comes out in the fall. In this episode we talk with Madfis about mass shootings in the United States. We talk about how access to guns along with gun culture contributes to gun violence. We also discuss the idea that "the only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good good with a gun." Finally, the discussion turns to ways to prevent school shootings. Research suggests a positive school environment might be a more effective way to stop school shootings before they start.
25:47 7/22/22
The Puyallup Assembly Center Part II: “They Didn’t Know What Had Happened in Their Community”
In this episode we talk to Cho Shimizu and Eileen Yamada Lamphere about the forced incarceration of Japanese and Japanese Americans during World War II. Shimizu was a small child when both he and his family were forced to leave their family farm and move first to the Puyallup Assembly Center and later to the Minidoka War Relocation Center. Lamphere's mother was also held at the Puyallup Assembly Center. Her parents later met at Minidoka. In these two episodes, Shimizu and Lamphere discuss what life was life for Japanese and Japanese Americans living in the South Sound prior to the start of World War II. They will also talk about conditions at places like the Puyallup Assembly Center and the impact this experience had on their families and on themselves. Finally, Shimizu and Lamphere talk about the importance of remembering this history and the vital role education plays in ensuring this happens. Part I: https://www.buzzsprout.com/265902/10766712-the-puyallup-assembly-center-part-i-treated-like-an-enemy
39:37 6/9/22
The Puyallup Assembly Center Part I: "Treated Like an Enemy"
In this episode we talk to Cho Shimizu and Eileen Yamada Lamphere about the forced incarceration of Japanese and Japanese Americans during World War II. Shimizu was a small child when both he and his family were forced to leave their family farm and move first to the Puyallup Assembly Center and later to the Minidoka War Relocation Center. Lamphere's mother was also held at the Puyallup Assembly Center. Her parents later met at Minidoka. During the next two episodes, Shimizu and Lamphere discuss what life was life for Japanese and Japanese Americans living in the South Sound prior to the start of World War II. They will also talk about conditions at places like the Puyallup Assembly Center and the impact this experience had on their families and on themselves. Finally, Shimizu and Lamphere talk about the importance of remembering this history and the vital role education plays in ensuring this happens. Part II: https://www.buzzsprout.com/265902/10767528-the-puyallup-assembly-center-part-ii-they-didn-t-know-what-had-happened-in-their-community
41:28 6/9/22
Like Mother, Like Son
In this episode of the podcast we hear from UW Tacoma senior Andre Henderson and his mother Renay Henderson. Andre graduates on June 13 with a degree in social welfare. Andre’s journey has been a difficult, but no matter what he always had the support of his family, including his mother. Renay earned a degree in human resources back in the early 2000’s, while raising three children and working full-time. Andre and Renay discuss their experiences in higher education and why they decided to attend college. Finally, mother and son talk about what it means to them to see each other succeed. 
25:48 6/6/22
Home/Office
In this episode of the podcast we take a tour of Professor Mike Honey’s office. Honey is a founding faculty member of UW Tacoma. He started in 1990 and moved into his current office in 1997. The office overlooks Pacific Avenue which runs right through the heart of downtown. Honey’s office is lined with books and posters. Research material and graded papers are stuffed into accordion file folders. There are at least two guitars and a banjo in the space. There are also records, cassettes and VHS tapes. The carpet is faded and worn from use. Honey has spent countless hours here. It is, in many ways more than just an office; it’s a home, a library and a gathering place. In this office Honey has conducted research, and written articles and books. He’s also met with students, community members and civil rights and labor leaders. Honey is retiring from teaching in July and will hand over the keys to his office, eventually. Honey may be retiring from teaching, but that doesn’t mean he’s done working.
42:47 6/1/22
Growing Mangos in the Desert
In this episode UW Tacoma Professor Katie Baird talks about her new book "Growing Mangos in the Desert." The book chronicles Baird's experience in the Peace Corps. The then twenty-something was sent to Mauritania to teach farmers there how to grow rice. Baird had very little training and couldn't speak the local language. Needless to say things didn't go as planned. Baird talks about her experience in Mauritania, how the transition to rice upended Mauritanian culture and whether or not the project worked. She also talks about the friendships she made and what the experience taught her. 
34:46 5/20/22
Still Doing Life
In 1996 Howard Zehr published "Doing Life." The book features photos and stories of men and women serving  life sentences in Pennsylvania prisons. Years later, Zehr partnered with UW Tacoma Associate Professor Barbara Toews on a follow up book. "Still Doing Life, 22 Lifers, 25 Years Later." In "Still Doing Life," Toews and Zehr talked with some of the same men and women featured in the original book. In this episode we talk about the books and the stories of men and women who have spent decades in prison. We also discuss life sentences, restorative justice and how "lifers" keep going and find meaning.
41:19 4/26/22
Women in Engineering: Breaking Down Barriers, Building Community
UW Tacoma Professor Heather Dillon and a group of students worked together to get a campus chapter of The Society of Women Engineers at UW Tacoma. Dillon and the students - Anna Wen, Jasmine Davis and Sophia Elmobdy - talk about the importance of having a SWE chapter on campus. The group also discusses the barriers women in engineering face. Finally, the conversation turns to why each student decided to pursue a degree in engineering and how they're hoping to build a welcoming environment at UW Tacoma for women considering a career in engineering. 
22:09 4/22/22

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