Show cover of Humans at Work with Michael Glazer

Humans at Work with Michael Glazer

In today’s world of work, it’s too easy to forget that Human Resource are actually Human People. This podcast gives you fresh perspectives on leadership, teams, change, diversity and values, as well as actionable ideas to make working with other humans better for everyone, because I believe that well-being at work is a basic human right.

Tracks

Leaders as Healers
In this episode, we're rethinking leadership with Nicholas Janni, author of “Leader As Healer” and teacher at IMD Business School and the University of Oxford Said Business School. Nicholas introduces the revolutionary concept of leaders as healers, advocating for a shift from the hyper-rational, imbalanced corporate norms that prioritize doing over being. He shares how integrating emotional intelligence and deep personal connections can transform leadership effectiveness. Join us as Nicholas shares how embracing our whole selves helps businesses and the people who work in them can thrive together. If you enjoy the show, please rate it on  Apple or Spotify. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast!  Episode Highlights The critical role of leaders in addressing global crises through deep personal and emotional connection. How fostering emotional openness and vulnerability can transform leadership effectiveness and workplace dynamics. Integrating meditative and somatic practices to elevate leaders' perceptual fields and empathy levels. The substantial business benefits of emotionally intelligent leadership, from engagement to profitability. The necessity of taking a leadership approach that prioritizes emotional authenticity for transformative change. How physical awareness and presence enhance leaders' decision-making capabilities and overall effectiveness. Creating organizational cultures that foster resilience and satisfaction. Nicholas’ view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today “Emotional the cultivation and welcoming of emotional authenticity. People being allowed to say how they're really feeling and being unconditionally met. There's nothing wrong with feeling frightened, sad. I think without that you'll never have well pay.” What "working with humans" means to Nicholas “It means working with the full spectrum of who we are. And most workplaces in my great, extensive experience, function on a very small spectrum of who we really are.” Resources Follow: Nicholas on LinkedIn Visit: Matrix Development website Read: Leader as Healer: A new paradigm for 21st-century leadership For more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/ ©Michael Glazer    
37:32 4/15/24
The Art of Spontaneous Communication (Rebroadcast)
We've all been there: put on the spot during a meeting and found ourselves tongue-tied. In this episode, we tackle the challenge of spontaneous communication head-on. I'm joined by Matt Abrahams, who is a Lecturer at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business and the host of the “Think Fast, Talk Smart,” which draws in millions of listeners per episode. His TEDx Talk has captivated a global audience, and his latest book is titled, “Think Faster, Talk Smarter: How to Speak Successfully When You're Put on the Spot.” Today, Matt shares his insights into preparing for those unscripted moments, managing speaking anxiety, and mastering the mindset shifts critical for effective communication. We'll cover practical strategies for nailing Q&A sessions and confidently handling challenging conversations.  If you enjoy the show, please rate it on iTunes or Spotify. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast! Episode Highlights ·         How preparation paradoxically improves your ability to speak spontaneously ·         Making your message resonate and be memorable ·         Creating a personalized anxiety management plan to reduce speaking anxiety ·         A critical mindset shift that improves communication quality and effectiveness ·         Reframing errors as learning opportunities to improve communication skills ·         How improving our listening skills can make spontaneous speaking more effective ·         Mastering Q&A sessions by engaging with people who are opposed to your ideas ·         Methods for handling difficult questions in tricky scenarios   Matt’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today “I think we saw with the pandemic, just how raw some people can be. It exposed that and put a light on it. And it's important that we respect it and that we connect with it. As a teacher, I see it in my students, I see it my colleagues. So, I believe all of us have to take a step back and remind ourselves that first and foremost, we're humans, we have challenges and issues, both in inside ourselves and in the relationships we have. And I think we need to spend more time respecting that in offering to help those who are struggling.” What “working with humans” means to Matt “To me, it is a reminder that communication is relational and about connection, not about transactions. We work with others, others who have their own existence, their own ideas, their own belief, and we need to remember that it's all about the relationship and the connection that we have and I think that is very powerful and very important.” Resources Follow: Matt on LinkedIn Visit: Matt’s website Read: Think Faster, Talk Smarter: How to Speak Successfully When You're Put on the Spot   For more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/    
37:30 4/1/24
Harnessing Trust, Motivation, and Emotions for Team Performance
This episode examines the components of building and leading high-performing teams with guests Alison Grieve and Jenni Miller, experts in transforming team dynamics at some of the world's leading companies, including PepsiCo and ING.   Alison and Jenni share practical advice on the critical roles of trust, motivation, and emotional intelligence in team success, as well as advice on fostering resilience, enhancing virtual and hybrid collaborations, and creating a culture of accountability and empowerment.    If you enjoy the show, please rate it on iTunes or Spotify. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights The importance of understanding and managing emotions within teams. How daily and significant changes within teams can affect team performance. The responsibility of leaders and team members in recognizing and managing emotions. The need for us to recognize our own blind spots and develop better self-awareness. How unchecked assumptions can lead to misunderstandings and conflicts. Recognizing that what motivates one team member may not motivate another. Feedback as a Tool for Growth: The significance of creating a culture of constructive feedback to foster personal and team growth. How shared experiences strengthen team bonds and trust. Concrete strategies to build trust and improve team performance.   Alison’s and Jenni’s views on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today Alison “I think isolation—so, talking about meetings, going into meetings, and nobody's got their video on their screen, so you can't see them. People are not communicating very well. They're just sending WhatsApp or Slack messages and emails. They don't meet physically. I think isolation then tends to make people feel that it's just about the task, and work becomes a tool because fun at work often comes from having solved a problem or overcome a challenge with someone else. And so, if we start to lose those, then I think it's really sad.”   Jenni “I was going to fully agree with what Alison said. I think it is the number one challenge that organizations are wrestling with at the moment in the debate about whether hybrids work or whether it's back to the office. I don't think it's actually a location issue. I think it's an isolation issue. So what people are picking up on is that people aren't as motivated or as productive as they could be if they're just working from home. That, the working from home bit, is not the issue. It's the fact that managers and teams aren't putting in mechanisms to make people feel still connected to the organization. You address that, and I imagine it's going to open up something really powerful and positive.”   What "working with humans" means to Alison and Jenni Alison “There is a warmth and creativity that is so empowering [to that phrase], and inspiring and energizing. That's what it's about.”   Jenni “What's the alternative? It's working with robots and artificial intelligence. I'm hearing a lot of concern from people, asking, ‘Are they going to replace me? What does that mean for my job going forward?’   Actually, the beauty of working with humans, as opposed to AI, is in solving really complex problems together, doing something for the first time that nobody's ever done before, being creative, and coming up with new ideas. Like, ‘I may well be proven wrong, but I don't think that robots and AI can do that.’ So, I believe that's what keeps us special and powerful as a species—all of that.”     Resources Follow: Alison and Jenni on LinkedIn Visit: Management Dynamics Read: Leading Edge: Strategies for developing and sustaining high-performing teams   Visit our website for a full transcript of this episode and for more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone.
49:24 3/18/24
Improv for Wellbeing
Can improv help us unlock workplace success? In this episode, we explore the positive impact of improvisation on well-being, communication, and the nuances of our daily interactions. Patricia Ryan Madson, Stanford University Emerita and author of “Improv Wisdom,” provides insights on how improv maxims can enhance the way we connect, create, and engage at work – and in life. If you enjoy the show, please rate it on iTunes or Spotify. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast! Episode Highlights Learn how simple acts of noticing and acknowledging others can have outsized effects on their well-being and yours. Find out how the maxim of "Yes, And" can enhance teamwork, creativity, and problem-solving. Uncover strategies for tackling common fears and anxieties in the workplace through the lens of improv. Explore how the practices of improv can sharpen your mindfulness and presence. Hear advice for applying improv principles in many aspects of daily life. Learn how to cultivate gratitude for the often-overlooked contributions of others. Discover how improvisation can be a powerful tool for navigating change and uncertainty. Use improv to improve your communication skills, making you a better listener and collaborator. Hear how the ethos of improv can help build a work environment where every voice is heard and valued. Patricia’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today  “I think that the greatest need is to discover the concept of ‘enough’. I think the workplace and the mania for pushing forward for more and greater, this need in our consumer world, that in order to keep going, everything has to grow and grow. I think we need to say enough. And to find space, and to slow down, and to do less.  I think our world would be a lot better, certainly businesses would be, if instead of just looking at the bottom line as the measure of success, more companies would see that the health of the world depends upon all of us being able to slow down a little more, respect each other, maybe not consume as much.  I just turned 81. And so, I am looking at trying to notice how my world has so many things that I’ve been collecting over the years, and realizing that it’s hard to get off that ‘let’s get some more stuff’ wagon. But I’m a proponent now of every day trying to find something that I can rehome or give away, or find a different home for, rather than just adding more. So, the concept of enough and slowing down would be what I would wish for our workplaces.” What "working with humans" means to Patricia “‘Working with humans’ is a reminder somehow that we’re all in this together. And that there’s no way that I can really thrive and succeed if I’m trying to do it on my own. So working with humans means shifting that in fact, as I was thinking about that, my eyes kind of rolled back in my head and I felt myself sort of go into me, but it’s I need to shift the attention so that I’m working with humans meaning never forget all of the others and my place in that to be helpful to them, to try to cause them less trouble and to make it work by doing my part.” Resources Read: Improv Wisdom: Don't Prepare, Just Show Up Visit our website for a full transcript of this episode and for more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone.  
48:45 3/4/24
Reverse Mentoring
Ever wondered what happens when we flip traditional corporate hierarchies, allowing the young to mentor the old? This episode zeroes in on reverse mentoring, showcasing its power to drive innovation and foster understanding across generations. Patrice Gordon, a pioneer at Virgin Atlantic and author of the book “Reverse Mentoring: Removing Barriers and Building Belonging in the Workplace.” Patrice explains how embracing uncomfortable moments and challenging our assumptions can lead to growth for both people and organizations. She also shares advice for setting up and running reserve mentoring programs and strategies for bringing more humanity into our organizations. Tune in to discover how you can harness the potential of reverse mentoring to not only enhance leadership but also create a more inclusive, dynamic workplace. If you enjoy the show, please rate it on iTunes or Spotify. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast! Episode Highlights Explore reverse mentoring's role in driving innovation and understanding between generations. Gain insights from Patrice Gordon on fostering inclusive leadership and authentic self-expression at work. Learn strategies from Virgin Atlantic's reverse mentoring for cultivating an inclusive culture. Steps to implement effective reverse mentoring programs for organizational change. Tackle misconceptions and challenges in reverse mentoring and DEI for better outcomes. The role of trust in reverse mentoring success and how to assess and build it. Criteria for selecting the right participants for pilot mentoring programs. Establishing psychological safety for impactful mentorship relationships. Enhancing workplace communication and connection through reverse mentoring. Keeping reverse mentoring programs alive and impactful with leadership commitment.   Patrice’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today  “I think it's about connection. So post-pandemic, like, you know, you've got better up service talks about like people who don't feel connected at work, people who would rather not be connected with the people at work, and people who really want to be connected with people at work. And so for me, well-being is about connection. Especially when we're talking about in a hybrid world, when we're talking about, you know, a lot of the work that I do is with the Gent with Gen Z and it's about them entering the workforce properly for the first time, and how things that we maybe took for granted being like seasoned, seasoned corporate employees. But what does that look like now especially being like digital natives, and now heading into a space where it may not actually be the Digital First, it's more people first. But really that connection and building authentic connection within an organization where people are more like people's opinions or views are more polarized than ever. And now we're living our lives at work as well. So, historically, we maybe didn't have the opportunity to bring all of our viewpoints and opinions to the office. But now we have no option but to write because it's just weaved into every part of our being now. And so connecting at a deeper level, from a pace of like honesty and transparency, but also with respect, that all feeds into that connection piece for me.”   What "working with humans" means to Patrice “Be more human. Like, bring as much of yourself to work as you feel comfortable in doing I always say, and, but it's recognizing people's individuality and respecting that and acknowledging that you have these wide policies. But actually, the one-on-one interaction those conversations…just will mean so much more to people to feel like seen and heard and valued. And I think everyone just needs to create bit more time to do that.”   Resources Follow: Patrice on LinkedIn Visit: Eminere Read: Reverse Mentoring: Removing Barriers and Building Belonging in the Workplace Watch: How reverse mentorship can help create better leaders   Visit our website for a full transcript of this episode and for more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone. © Michael Glazer
59:07 2/19/24
Empowerment After 50
Facing gender bias is tough. Add ageism to the mix, and the workplace becomes a whole different challenge. This episode examines the landscape for women over 50 in the workplace, spotlighted through Dr. Lucy Ryan's insights from her book, "Revolting Women." Addressing the dual hurdles of ageism and gender bias, Dr. Ryan explains how societal expectations shape professional experiences. She shares compelling stories about navigating menopause and caregiving, alongside strategies for midlife women. The discussion includes advice for employers, such as having midlife check-ins, to create a more inclusive and equitable environment. If you enjoy the show, please rate it on iTunes or Spotify. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast! Episode Highlights Understand the fusion of ageism and sexism affecting workplace dynamics for women. Strategies for managing age and gender perceptions in professional settings. Practical tips for addressing menopause impacts in the workplace. Advice for navigating the compound challenges of caregiving, menopause, and mental health. Innovative approaches to combat workplace discrimination and bias. Steps to create menopause-friendly and supportive environments for midlife women. Key strategies for organizational adaptation to support midlife women’s needs. Lucy's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "I'm a leadership coach, and one of the things that happens with almost every single client I coach is they don't have enough space to reflect. And it's not built into the workplace. It's as if people are going from call to call to call to call...So where do we reflect? Where do we get space to breathe? So, I would really like that to happen?" What "working with humans" means to Lucy We forget often that we are working with humans…But I think the organization is so busy with processes. We have jargon for everything. We have all the process going on change processes, target operating models, we have more jargon than you can throw at a person every single day. And we forget that we've just got human beings with their own lives, difficulties, joys going on every day. And that means that we need to build compassionate conversations into our workplace.”  Resources: Follow: Lucy on LinkedIn Visit: Lucy’s website Read: Revolting Women: Why midlife women are walking out, and what to do about it For a full transcript of this episode and for more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/   ©Michael Glazer
41:16 2/5/24
Are You Leading With Your Right Brain?
Do you excel in analytical, strategic and goal-oriented tasks yet often get bogged down in thinking through how to unstick yourself from complicated situations or challenges? This episode focuses on how tapping into the power of your right brain can help you move forward through seemingly intractable challenges. The right brain is our gateway to seeing the big picture, infusing fresh ideas and deeper understanding into your life. It’s the part of our brain that helps us interpret the world through our senses and is vital for empathy, enabling us to forge genuine connections with others. Our guest is Yda Bouvier, and she has a unique mix of business expertise and physics knowledge, which includes over a decade working in senior roles at Boston Consulting Group. She’s also an accomplished executive coach and the author of the recent book, “Leading with the Right Brain”.  If you enjoy the show, please take a moment to rate it on Spotify. Your ratings hep more people like you discover the podcast! Episode Highlights · An exploration of the unique functions of the left and right brain in life and decision-making. · A revealing look at the brain's ability to simplify complex information. · An examination of the evolutionary reasons for the predominance of left-brain thinking. · A discussion on effective strategies to engage the right brain for holistic problem-solving. · Insights into using metaphors in coaching to unlock deeper understanding and solutions. · Practical advice for using right-brain thinking techniques to tackle complex challenges. · A unique perspective on integrating business, physics, and executive coaching expertise. Yda’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today  "I think the [greatest] unmet need in the workplace is still for people to feel really seen, seen and heard, and acknowledged for just simply who they are and what they bring. I feel that we’re just as a we’re not good at…making others the other feel seen and heard.” What "working with humans" means to Yda “When I think about working with humans, I immediately think about the transition we’re all in at the moment. Part of it is trying to figure out how to work with increasingly intelligent machines. And, you know, I’m facing that as an individual, but if you’re running an organization, this is something that is absolutely top of mind. Now, when I think about working with humans, it seems to me that because machines are developing so fast, we need to develop quickly and cultivate the unique human advantages that we bring. It’s not hard to argue that computers and AI compete more easily with the qualities of the left side of your brain, and that the right side of your brain allows for a uniquely human advantage. So, we can really leverage that. But also, when we work with the right side [of the brain], AI is just another team member we can collaborate with. Working with humans then also means working with machines because you can see AI as a team member. This may be a funny twist you haven’t thought about yet. But when I think about working with humans, I think about us really using our human advantage to also be able to work with intelligent machines.” Resources: Follow: Yda on LinkedIn Visit: Yda’s website Read: Leading with the Right Brain For more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/ ©Michael Glazer
39:52 1/22/24
A Conversation with Nobel Laureate Dr. Robert Lefkowitz (Rebroadcast)
Dr. Robert Lefkowitz shares anecdotes and wisdom from his extraordinary career. This episode delves into the power of storytelling and narratives, building a legacy based on mentorship, overcoming harsh criticism, and using personal values at work. Lefkowitz won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2012 for “for studies of G-protein-coupled receptors.” His memoir is titled “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Stockholm”. Today, more than half of all prescription drug sales are of drugs that target either directly or indirectly the receptors discovered by Dr. Lefkowitz and his trainees. If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify. Your rating helps more people like you discover the podcast! Episode Highlights The importance of crafting and telling stories How revising an old story we tell ourselves can pay off professionally Coping with challenges and setbacks Constructively decoding rejection Why learning to say no to career opportunities matters Bob's criteria for making career decisions Advice for making life's most important decisions Bob's first rule of mentoring: tailor it for each and every person How Bob wants to be remembered Bob’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "You're coming to turf that's very near and dear to my heart...Both my parents had premature heart attacks. My father died of his fourth heart attack at 63. He had his first one when he was 50. So there were clearly strong genetic factors favoring heart disease in my family...I developed angina and had quadruple bypass surgery. That was 30 years ago, and I'm still here and still kicking. So how did that come to be? Because I, as a cardiologist, paid meticulous attention to risk factors that I can alter. The one I can't alter, of course, is my genetics. But there are lots of others that you can. So in the workplace, if I could focus on two things, one would be the food that people are eating. [Addressing] the vending machines, and the crap that they serve in the cafeteria. So healthier eating. The other is exercise. Okay, I'm a nut about both subjects. So, for most of my career, I would go out, and about noon time with a very close friend of mine who's a faculty member. And we would go for a run at lunchtime. And I wish there were more emphasis on that facilities that were conveniently available, and ways to structure the work day so that people are given breaks to go out and exercise. I think wellness is very, very important. And then of course, you know that there's the whole stress business, which there are various ways to handle. But I think an emphasis on wellness is extremely important. It has been for me, the fact that I'm still here 30 years later, I work full time at 80 [years old]. I'm still full time, and I just renewed my grants for another five years. I'm still at it!" What “working with humans” means to Bob “One of my most closely held core values is human dignity. And to me, one of the most important things about working with people is to show everybody the same level of respect. I don't care if a Nobel laureates coming into my office, or -- I have a great relationship with the guy who picks up the trash every day, he comes in. And I'll say, "Hey, I got some great stuff for you here!" You know, I'll hand in my trash can. I say, "be careful with it!" as I banter with him. I don't care if you're picking up the trash or you're a Nobel Laureate. I want to show you the respect that, to me, every human being deserves. Now there's a balance. One of the things I learned when I was in Hebrew school as a kid that I remember to this day is there was a there's an ancient Jewish texts, called Pirkei Avot, which means Stories of the Fathers. These are sage pieces of advice passed down for centuries and centuries. One of them is attributed to him ancient rabbi whose name was Hillel. Hillel had this saying, it goes something like this. "If I am not for me, who will be for me? If I am only for me, who am I? If not now, when?" And there's huge wisdom in that. But to me the balancing between self-interest because, in the end, you're responsible for yourself. Because, if I'm not for me, who will be for me? But on the other hand, if I'm only for me, then who am I? You got to take care of others. And to me, that's what it's all about.” Resources Read: Bob's profile on Wikipedia and at Duke University's website Read: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Stockholm: The Adrenaline-Fueled Adventures of an Accidental Scientist Watch: Bob's Nobel Lecture (slides and transcript also available) Read: about Pirkei Avot For more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/ ©Michael Glazer
49:38 1/1/24
Coaching That Really Works (Rebroadcast)
With employee disengagement at alarming levels despite significant investments in training leaders in coaching skills, there's a pressing need to reevaluate and get practical about making coaching truly effective for people in managerial roles. This episode zeroes in on how to address this gap, introducing insights and tools for leaders to genuinely engage and empower their teams. Dominic Ashley-Timms, CEO of Notion, has firsthand experience across 37 countries, providing a fresh and nuanced perspective on leadership, culture, and organizational transformation. Having co-authored "The Answer Is a Question", Dominic brings an innovative approach to everyday coaching, rooted in the STAR® model he co-created. If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast!  Episode Highlights The vital role of questions and their effectiveness. Crafting questions that stimulate constructive thought processes. Advanced questioning techniques for seasoned managers. External cues (also called triggers) and their role in influencing behavioral shifts. Molding triggers to fit seamlessly into a manager’s coaching approach. Pinpointing moments ripe for coaching interventions. Addressing the knowledge gap in framing effective questions. The strategy behind intentional questioning. Exploring question facets: their classification, delivery, and timing. Varied question styles for clarity, comparison, and an outward focus. Emphasizing the need for pause, reflection, and then ask the right question. Dominic's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "The issue is not so much about how we're being taught well-being; it's more about adapting our behavior and changing our mental models. We need to redefine what our roles are as managers. This is not just an individual conversation but also an organizational one. Within my company, we're facilitating discussions with leadership teams of major organizations to explore what they expect from their managerial layers. Unfortunately, many organizations aren't having this crucial dialogue. The goal should be to create an engaged, contributing workforce where people can operate at their highest level and feel valued for it. To achieve this, managers need to be skilled in fostering such an environment. When it comes to well-being, we all need to feel seen, acknowledged, and respected. Most management training programs focus on transactional skills; they're episodic and don't foster a continuous mindset shift. We need to move away from the traditional role of the manager as the "problem solver" or the one who "keeps the lights on." Instead, managers should enable their team members to give their best, inviting and valuing their contributions. This shift in behavior can lead to more trusting and engaging relationships with team members. When we started this work 15 years ago, we were often measured by improvements in engagement scores. It's not complicated—if you want to improve engagement, then engage more. However, many managers are so preoccupied with their task lists that they neglect the people-engagement aspect of their roles. We argue that reversing this trend has significant benefits, not just for teams, but also for managers. Adopting an operational coaching approach to management has been reported to reduce stress and create a more balanced work week. Recent research has even shown that the relationship with one's line manager has a greater impact on mental well-being than relationships with a spouse, pastor, or doctor. Considering the number of hours spent at work, it's easy to understand why a relationship with a manager can have such a significant impact on mental well-being. So, we are at an inflection point. If you are a line manager responsible for people, it's time to consider how you will engage differently in the next phase of your career." What “working with humans” means to Dominic “The tenets of management haven't really changed over the last century. When we examine organizations, we often refer to the workforce as a "resource." In consulting, it's termed "human capital management," and we have Human Resources departments. We haven't really moved beyond viewing humans merely as resources. We recently gave a significant talk in London about re-humanizing management. The focus is on helping managers understand that their role extends beyond merely ensuring that work proceeds. They are also there to engage the workforce and take them along on the journey. Working with humans is exactly that — if people aren't actively contributing to the work, there's no progress. If we were to ask ourselves what percentage of the available talent in our workforce we are truly tapping into, the answer might be unsettling.” Resources Follow: Dominic on LinkedIn Visit: Notion website Read: The Answer Is a Question For more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/ ©Michael Glazer
59:55 12/18/23
Tech-Driven Human Work Experience
How is the intersection of technology and human experience reshaping our workplaces? In this episode, we explore the dynamic evolution of work environments, where technology and human-centric practices are becoming increasingly intertwined. You’ll hear about leveraging technology to create more inclusive and equitable workplaces, simplifying work processes through AI, and shifting the focus from productivity to impact.  Stela Lupushor is the founder of Reframe.Work Inc. She is also Program Director for the Strategic Workforce Planning and Talent Management Councils, as well as the Human Capital Analytics Institute Senior Fellow shaping the research agenda of the Conference Board. She offers a unique blend of expertise in her latest co-authored book, "Humans at Work: The Art and Practice of Creating the Hybrid Workplace." If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast! Episode Highlights Insights on technology's immediate impact in today's work environment. Strategies for effective, real-time workplace measurements. Tips on reducing workplace friction to boost productivity and well-being. Understanding the importance of everyday moments in employee retention. Recognizing the power of addressing small, individual workplace challenges. Balancing employee privacy with organizational needs. Redesigning workspaces for mental health and improved focus. Stela's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today  “From a well-being perspective, [it’s] the need to interact with an organization that is not designed to work around us. We look at the technology stack as something that IT managers manage, and it's all about cost containment and making it secure. And that comes at a cost of a lot of compliance training, not to say that none of that is necessary; it's very important. But it's more compliance-driven than experience-driven.  When we think about the physical workspace, it's again designed to minimize the costs and maximize the number of people that can fit within a square foot. And not necessarily designed to have the environment work around us for what we need, whether we have a permanent or temporary disability, whether we need quiet space at that specific time of the day. And with the combination of both digital world and physical world, we increasingly live in that in-between, regardless of what work you do, there's bound to be technology involved.  So, redesigning that experience, to allow us to seamlessly move through it without having context switching and friction points and forgotten passwords, inaccessible devices, will reduce the mental health impact, mental taxing in dramatic ways and really leave space for us to do the focused work or whatever it is that makes sense for us as humans at that time.” What "working with humans" means to Stela “It is about creating the environment where people can truly maximize their human potential at work. I don't believe that there are bad people for jobs. I don't believe there are bad jobs for people; I believe there's a mismatch. So, the more we can think through the lens of what are the superpowers of this individual, or what are the superpowers they would like to have, and how we can create that environment for them to thrive? I think that's when organizations succeed. That's when individuals are loyal and bring their full potential. That's when the economy benefits, and that's when families at home benefit as well. So, it's a net positive.” Resources Follow: Stela on LinkedIn Read: Humans at Work: The Art and Practice of Creating the Hybrid Workplace For more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/ ©Michael Glazer
40:55 12/4/23
The Art of Spontaneous Communication
We've all been there: put on the spot during a meeting and found ourselves tongue-tied. In this episode, we tackle the challenge of spontaneous communication head-on. I'm joined by Matt Abrahams, who is a Lecturer at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business and the host of the “Think Fast, Talk Smart,” which draws in millions of listeners per episode. His TEDx Talk has captivated a global audience, and his latest book is titled, “Think Faster, Talk Smarter: How to Speak Successfully When You're Put on the Spot.” Today, Matt shares his insights into preparing for those unscripted moments, managing speaking anxiety, and mastering the mindset shifts critical for effective communication. We'll cover practical strategies for nailing Q&A sessions and confidently handling challenging conversations.  If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast! Episode Highlights ·         How preparation paradoxically improves your ability to speak spontaneously ·         Making your message resonate and be memorable ·         Creating a personalized anxiety management plan to reduce speaking anxiety ·         A critical mindset shift that improves communication quality and effectiveness ·         Reframing errors as learning opportunities to improve communication skills ·         How improving our listening skills can make spontaneous speaking more effective ·         Mastering Q&A sessions by engaging with people who are opposed to your ideas ·         Methods for handling difficult questions in tricky scenarios Matt’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today “I think we saw with the pandemic, just how raw some people can be. It exposed that and put a light on it. And it's important that we respect it and that we connect with it. As a teacher, I see it in my students, I see it my colleagues. So, I believe all of us have to take a step back and remind ourselves that first and foremost, we're humans, we have challenges and issues, both in inside ourselves and in the relationships we have. And I think we need to spend more time respecting that in offering to help those who are struggling.” What “working with humans” means to Matt “To me, it is a reminder that communication is relational and about connection, not about transactions. We work with others, others who have their own existence, their own ideas, their own belief, and we need to remember that it's all about the relationship and the connection that we have and I think that is very powerful and very important.” Resources Follow: Matt on LinkedIn Visit: Matt’s website Read: Think Faster, Talk Smarter: How to Speak Successfully When You're Put on the Spot   For more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/ ©Michael Glazer
36:44 11/20/23
Transforming Work Through Creativity
Have you hit a creative roadblock at work? You’re not alone. In this episode, we explore how creativity becomes the cornerstone for innovation, helping businesses to thrive amidst rapidly changing trends and disruptions. It’s not about wild ideas. It’s about building an environment where creativity thrives at every desk. This episode features Adam Kingl, an expert in reshaping how we think about leadership and strategy in the business world. Adam has influenced the minds of business leaders at prestigious institutions such as London Business School, Hult International Business School, and Imperial College Business School. He also regularly contributes as a writer and expert interviewee to The Financial Times, Sunday Times, Forbes, Fortune, The Guardian and Fast Company. Drawing on and his latest book "Sparking Success", we explore strategies that can help leaders remove the creativity blockers and spark a cultural shift towards continuous innovation. From rethinking entrenched company practices to empowering teams to think differently, Adam offers a roadmap for people who want to lead with creativity at the forefront. If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast! Episode Highlights ·         Leadership’s pivotal role in igniting organizational creativity. ·         Challenging dated assumptions that hinder management innovation. ·         The linguistic insight into “to manage” and its cultural impact on creativity. ·         Identifying organizational habits that dampen innovation. ·         Striking a balance between productivity and creative growth. ·         Tactics for leaders to build creativity-focused workspaces. ·         Debunking the myth that creativity is limited to certain sectors. ·         Concrete steps for managers to inspire team creativity. ·         Lessons from creative companies and industries applicable across all sectors. ·         Examining barriers to creativity in conventional settings. ·         Adopting ‘micro habits’ for team-wide innovative thinking.   Adam’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "Every organization is struggling with hybrid work right now, right? When do you bring people into the office, or when do you work from home? And I think part of what I've discovered is the answer is: if you're going to ask people to come into the office, give them a reason, provide a creative focus. "I want everyone in the office on Wednesday because we're going to meet with our senior-most clients talking about their biggest pain points." If you just say, "Come in because it's everyone in the office Wednesday," like Taco Tuesday, it's arbitrary, and everyone's just going to probably sit at their desk with headphones in, tapping away at their keyboard; they may as well be at home." What “working with humans” means to Adam "Working with humans is about encouraging them to find and express those qualities that make them human: curiosity, adaptability, inspiration, innovation. Surely, any organization that encourages an abundance of those qualities in their people is one that I want to work for or invest in." Resources Follow: Adam on LinkedIn and X Visit: Adam’s website Read: Sparking Success: Why Every Leader Needs to Develop a Creative Mindset   For more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/ ©Michael Glazer
42:15 11/6/23
Meaningful Career Conversations
Looking to improve the quality of your career conversations at work? This episode dives into practical topics like the role of managers in employee development, common challenges like fear of feedback, and actionable insights to overcome challenges that often come up. My guest, Antoinette Oglethorpe, brings a wealth of experience to the conversation, having worked with organizations such as Accenture, the World Health Organization, and the NHS. She's also the author of the book "Confident Career Conversations," which serves as a comprehensive guide for enhancing employee development through meaningful dialogue. You'll walk away with practical advice and strategies for making career conversations a valuable part of your organization’s culture. If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast! Episode Highlights How focusing on "employability" and "enjoyability" improves the quality of the career conversation. How managers can initiate and guide career conversations. Addressing the common challenges managers face, such as lack of time or fear of giving feedback. Ways HR can support managers and employees in having meaningful conversations. Strategies for incorporating career conversations into performance reviews and employee onboarding. Strategies to tackle the fear of feedback from both managers and employees. How to navigate sensitive topics like job security and career transitions. Simple techniques to implement immediately for improving communication. How career conversations contribute to employee wellbeing and organizational health. Antoinette's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "This new world of hybrid working is now becoming the way forward. As you say, I think that during COVID we took great steps to connect with people even though we were working remotely. I think that focus has gone away now. And yet hybrid working seems as though it's here to stay. So, I think that's potentially a risky area where there's a lack of connection, a lack of visibility of employees, and a lack of conversation about what's going on for them as individuals. And I think that's something we all need to think about." What “working with humans” means to Antoinette “It's about navigating the human side of business. Business and organizations rely on people, and that involves communication, relationships, and collaboration. It's often complicated, but it's important to recognize that these aren't just human resources or human capital, as they have been called, or a parcel of human assets. They are humans. So, actually connecting to that human element of those individuals is crucial.” Resources Follow: Antoinette on LinkedIn Visit: Antoinette’s company website Read: Confident Career Conversations: Empower your employees for career growth and retention ©Michael Glazer
39:42 10/23/23
Decoding and Dealing with Toxic Behaviors (Rebroadcast)
Why do toxic behaviors persist in workplaces despite efforts for a healthier work culture? Find out how to discern healthy behaviors from toxic ones and learn what you can do to cope successfully with toxic relationships and environments. Anna Eliatamby is a clinical psychologist and workplace well-being expert who has played a pivotal role in developing mental health, responsible leadership and well-being strategies for global organizations, including the UN, International Red Cross and Red Crescent, and PwC. She is the Director of HealthyLeadership CIC, a collective that encourages individuals and organizations to foster decency and make positive changes. Anna is also the author of the Decency Journey Series, a collection of compact and practical pocketbooks designed to help individuals flourish in their careers and workplaces.   Originally aired as episode 96. If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 2:56 Why do people engage in toxic behavior? 6:22 The combination of toxic behavior and positive intent 9:37 Impacts of toxic behavior 12:32 Toxic behaviors can cause inadvertent self-sabotage 14:44 The difference between holding someone accountable and blaming 17:31 The mindset behind toxic behaviors 19:55 Assessing our own toxic tendencies 26:08 Critical skills and expectations for confronting toxic behaviors 30:14 More techniques for coping with toxic behaviors 33:10 The importance of self-care when coping with toxic behavior 34:28 Practical considerations, and pitfalls, for deciding on a coping strategy 39:14 Key ingredient for outgrowing our own toxic attendances   Anna's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "I think the greatest unmet need is that we must address the negative the toxicity at the same time as we're adding to the positive and teaching people about things like compassion, both are necessary." What “working with humans” means to Anna “It's a lovely phrase, and I think it is just that to remember that we are human beings, we all are. And that should be the center from which we work. So if we're human we work with compassion, with respect, with decency -- with ourselves and with other people.”   Resources Follow: Anna on LinkedIn Visit: Healthy Leadership CIC Read: the Decency Journey series of books   ©Michael Glazer   ©Michael Glazer
43:11 10/9/23
Cults, Corporates, and Breaking the Burnout Cycle
Ever questioned if your office vibes feel a bit too 'cultish'? Or maybe you think burnout is just an individual failing? Petra Velzeboer, a psychotherapist, CEO, and author of "Begin With You," who was born into a notorious cult, brings clarity to the gray areas of workplace dynamics, exploring the fine line between a demanding job and a toxic work culture. This episode examines both organizational and individual sources of workplace toxicity. It includes discussions on hard-hitting topics such as the role of leadership in employee burnout, the importance of setting explicit boundaries in hybrid work environments, and the need for open dialogues about mental health to prevent larger issues down the line. This episode is not just a discussion but a call to action, offering practical steps for individual and organizational change.   Episode Highlights The uncanny similarities between cult dynamics and toxic workplace cultures. The role of leadership in either preventing or fueling employee burnout. Exploring the complexities of "burnout" beyond just workload, including its ties to personal history and societal norms. Unpacking the psychological toll of conforming to toxic workplace cultures, and how to break free. Why focusing solely on mental health symptoms is a missed opportunity, and what conversations we should be having instead. The nuanced approach to setting boundaries in a world increasingly blending work and home. What it really means to be "fully present" for your colleagues, and why it's more critical than ever. Tips for fostering mental well-being in hybrid and remote work environments, and why it's not just an HR issue. How a leader's openness about personal struggles can pave the way for a more supportive work environment. The hidden pitfalls of following society's blueprint for success, and what you could consider doing differently. For more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/   ©Michael Glazer
44:39 9/25/23
Coaching That Really Works
With employee disengagement at alarming levels despite significant investments in training leaders in coaching skills, there's a pressing need to reevaluate and get practical about making coaching truly effective for people in managerial roles. This episode zeroes in on how to address this gap, introducing insights and tools for leaders to genuinely engage and empower their teams. Dominic Ashley-Timms, CEO of Notion, has firsthand experience across 37 countries, providing a fresh and nuanced perspective on leadership, culture, and organizational transformation. Having co-authored "The Answer Is a Question", Dominic brings an innovative approach to everyday coaching, rooted in the STAR® model he co-created.   Episode Highlights The vital role of questions and their effectiveness. Crafting questions that stimulate constructive thought processes. Advanced questioning techniques for seasoned managers.         External cues (also called triggers) and their role in influencing behavioral shifts. Molding triggers to fit seamlessly into a manager’s coaching approach. Pinpointing moments ripe for coaching interventions. Addressing the knowledge gap in framing effective questions. The strategy behind intentional questioning. Exploring question facets: their classification, delivery, and timing. Varied question styles for clarity, comparison, and an outward focus. Emphasizing the need for pause, reflection, and then ask the right question.   For more episodes that give you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas for making working with other humans better for everyone, visit our website at https://en.peoplefocusconsulting.com/resources/podcast/   ©Michael Glazer
59:40 9/11/23
Highlights from the First 100 Episodes
This special episode offers a reflective journey through eight of the most popular conversations from the first 100 episodes of Humans At Work. Starting with Zana Goic Petricevic's profound insights on workplace well-being, and ending with Judd Hoekstra's riveting story about handling pressure, this collection covers themes essential to professional and personal growth. You'll hear a fascinating take from Jessica Grossmeier about the state work workplace wellbeing,  Geoff McDonald's influential perspective on mental health, Berta Aldridge's practical strategies against bullying, Bob Lefkowitz's unconventional views on success, Ruth Gotian's insights on mentorship, and Dorie Clark's advice on aligning daily life with long-term purpose. These conversations have resonated with listeners and shaped my thinking. I believe they'll engage, challenge, and inspire you as well. Timestamps   [1:48]    Zana Goic Petricevic on Workplace Well-being and Unmet Needs   [4:40]    Jessica Grossmeier on The Disconnect in Employee Well-being   [7:55]    Geoff McDonald on Overcoming the Stigma of Mental Ill Health [10:08]    Berta Aldridge on Strategies for Handling Bullies at Work [14:40]    Bob Lefkowitz on a Key to Professional Success [18:38]    Ruth Gotian on Mentorship and Achieving Success [24:25]    Dorie Clark on Creating Whitespace and Playing the Long Game [30:32]    Judd Hoekstra on Handling High-Pressure Situations
38:35 8/28/23
Crisis Leadership and the Art of Being Flexible
In a world where readiness for unexpected challenges is crucial, how can leaders foster resilience, inclusivity, and creativity within their teams? This episode explores the importance of putting people first, embracing diversity in the creative sector, and leveraging collaboration during difficult times. You'll also discover insights on finding growth opportunities amid disaster, managing mental health as a leader, and practical lessons on being resilient and flexible in tumultuous times. James Burstall is CEO of Argonon, one of the UK’s top international independent production groups. The group is headquartered in London with hubs in New York, Los Angeles, Oklahoma, Liverpool and Glasgow. The group produces shows ranging from The Masked Singer through to iconic current affairs program Dispatches, critically-acclaimed BBC One series Attenborough and the Mammoth Graveyard to much-loved BBC drama Worzel Gummidge. His book The Flexible Method – Prepare to Prosper In The Next Global Crisis offers a practical guide to preparing for a crisis, with unique insights from leaders across the board – including media, health, hospitality, travel and non-profit. James has worked as an executive producer and producer-director for broadcasters all over the world. Prior to his television career, he was a journalist, working as a writer and editor in Paris, London and New York for Vanity Fair, Condé Nast Traveler, HG, Vogue, The Daily Mail and The Evening Standard.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights How James’ background as a journalist shaped his values and decision-making as a leader. Making tough decisions that aligned with personal principles even when they conflicted with his organization’s. Promoting diversity not just internally but also in how Argonon’s business is run. Why promoting diversity matters to James Making the decision to prioritize the health and morale of employees over commercial interests. How managers can insulate employees from common stressors in the creative sector How Argonon orchestrated the transition of a global workforce from in-office to remote in 48 hours. How creating “cobra teams” helped Argonon navigate the early days of the pandemic Embodying kindness as a CEO Striking a balance between being vulnerable and oversharing with employees Tapping into personal support networks during times of crisis How the pandemic has shaped and transformed James’ leadership style   James’ view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "Mental health is probably the biggest concern. I think that stress and mental well being is now more acute than ever. And I'm pleased that for example, Prince Harry has talked about mental health among young men. I think that's a really healthy move in the right direction. Because the truth is that it's completely normal and human sometimes not to feel great, or even to get depressed. It happens to us. It's not nice, but it does happen. There are many tools available, and we made those tools available to all our people. We need to make sure that we are listening to our people, that people have a proper recourse, whether it's through HR or through their managers to speak about what they're really feeling. And if they're struggling, we want people to tell us about it, because then we can do something about it together."   What “working with humans” means to James “I loved it when you approached me to have this conversation. Because working with humans is exactly what we do. And that's who we are as an organization. We are all about people. We're all about talent. Argonon wouldn't exist without our people. We don't have loads of machinery…What we have is amazingly creative individuals. And it's when those individuals come together, they create magic. And we create amazing programs, whether it's drama with documentary or reality or entertainment. We've won more than 125 international awards. We entertain millions of people all over the world. And how has that happened? It was because of people coming together in a very supportive, inclusive environment. And when you do that, they create incredible work.”   ©Michael Glazer
53:42 8/14/23
Purpose and Workplace Wellbeing
What’s the importance of purpose for our work performance and its impact on well-being? This episode addresses this question and highlights the role purpose plays in cultivating intrinsic motivation, and the need for purpose to be aligned with everyday life. We also explore the role of purpose in organizational success, the gap between leaders and employees in feeling a sense of purpose, and the challenges of implementing a comprehensive approach to workplace well-being. Along the way, we address burnout as a phenomenon related to working conditions and cover the need for organizations to prioritize tasks and support their employees. Jessica Grossmeier, PhD, MPH is an award-winning researcher and the author of Reimagining Workplace Well-being: Fostering a Culture of Purpose, Connection, and Transcendence. She is a leading voice in workplace well-being and was recently recognized as one of the most influential women leaders in health promotion. Dr. Grossmeier has published more than 80 articles in peer-reviewed and industry professional journals and presented at more than 100 industry events and webinars.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights The personal payoff for having a strong sense of purpose The neuroscience of purpose and the benefits of reflecting on values and purpose How reconnecting with values and purpose can transform work experiences. The significance of integrating purpose into various aspects of the workplace, such as onboarding and performance reviews, for organizational success. Understanding burnout as a phenomenon related to working conditions and the need for recovery and support from organizations. The changing expectations of employees and the importance of social connection in the workplace. The need to approach work with dignity, respect, and compassion, embracing complexity and imperfection.   Jessica's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "Social connection, because people still feel like how we treat one another at work isn't necessarily the top priority. It's like, 'results of a top priority. Get there any way you can.' The unmet need is, is actually building social connection into the workplace. And many organizations have said, 'Okay, I get it.' Now, the pandemic taught us that when you don't have social connection, it's a big problem. And so some organizations are saying, well just get people back into the office, it's naturally going to change.' Well, actually, it won't, because what research shows us is that you have to attend to more than just giving people the opportunity to come together, you have to intentionally foster deeper conversations about things that matter to people and to help people to connect in a human way, not just around the everyday tasks of their work."   What “working with humans” means to Jessica “When I think about what it means to be human, I think about complexity, adaptiveness resilience, imperfection. Working with humans is about embracing complexity and imperfection with a default mindset that appreciates the whole person—the light, the dark, the positive, the negative, the inspiring, and the distressing—knowing we're all interconnected. And under different circumstances, we will reveal either the best or worse of ourselves. And so with this understanding, I think working with humans is about approaching our work with a spirit of dignity and respect and compassion that's offered to everybody, especially those we dislike, misunderstand or disagree with.”   Resources Follow: Jessica on LinkedIn Visit: Jessica's website Read: Reimagining Workplace Well-being: Fostering a Culture of Purpose, Connection, and Transcendence  
46:54 7/31/23
Power and Inclusive Workplaces
Are you curious about how power dynamics can shape a more inclusive and welcoming environment at work? This episode navigates the complex relationship between power, inclusiveness, and creating a sense of belonging. Jason Patent is a consultant and educator as well as the author of Humanly Possible: A New Model of Leadership for a More Inclusive World. Jason has lived and worked extensively in China, and his past roles include Director of the Robertson Center for Intercultural Leadership at UC Berkeley’s International House, American Co-Director of the Hopkins–Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies, and Director of the Stanford Program in Beijing.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 1:44   The relationship between power and inclusiveness 6:15   Examples of how we can be blind to our own power 7:24   Navigating interpersonal power dynamics in China 10:33 The intersection of cultural dimensions and power 18:42 The "but test" to gain insights about our own biases 21:19 How good intentions can backfire when we're unaware of our biases 24:01 Explanation of the concept of bridging 29:37 Strategies for bridging across high and low context cultures 39:29 The practice of bridging by "taking one extra beat" 42:56 How to receive feedback from somebody who has less power 48:34 Tim Clark's four stages of psychological safety   Jason's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "It is, to the extent that somebody has power, including societal privilege, right, identity based societal privilege, acknowledging that and using it to create more inclusive spaces and more psychologically safe space...because by not doing that we are damaging others."   What “working with humans” means to Jason “If I had to put it in one word...I would say 'care'. Working with humans is treating other human beings with care...I feel that every human life is precious. Human dignity is precious. And we need to take care of one another. And if I have the opportunity, and the privilege and the honor of working with another human, I have the duty to care.”   Resources Follow: Jason on LinkedIn Visit: Jason's website Read: Humanly Possible: A New Model of Leadership for a More Inclusive World   ©Michael Glazer
58:32 7/17/23
Workplace Equity
DEI conversations are on the rise, but the discomfort discussing race persists. Meanwhile people striving for workplace equity face persistent challenges. This episode explores the path to a more equitable workplace with Jenny Garrett OBE. As a diversity expert and author of Equality vs Equity: Tackling Issues of Race in the Workplace, Jenny shares her expertise on understanding the global majority, breaking down common barriers to equity, fostering empathy, and taking actionable steps towards creating inclusive environments.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 1:38 The importance of understanding the who the global majority is 5:32 Objective awareness helps make workplaces more equitable 8:08 Addressing privilege doesn't require the majority "to lose" 15:18 How majority can start to do their own work to educate themselves 18:42 Supporting people who want to support DEI but fear taking action 23:29 Bridging good intentions with meaningful action 29:33 Building literacy to talk about race and ethnicity 32:47 Creating long-term psychological safety to talk about DEI candidly 36:37 Correcting the misperception of powerlessness in making change   Jenny's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "I think that we just need space and time. Perhaps we've gotten into productivity overload. The global pandemic showed us that we can work from anywhere at any time. And that was great, but it's also really dangerous. So, I think the well being need is for space and time where we don't have to be productive. And [related to] communication, [we need to] actually talk to each other, not just about key performance indicators and the next task, but also [asking] 'how are you? And how can I support you? And what do you need?' And having those kinds of conversations are a couple of things that would really help us in the workplace." What “working with humans” means to Jenny “It means to embrace the diversity that is all around us and to really enjoy it. So to not be frustrated by it, but to be to embrace it. And I think most of all, to be curious about each other, to ask those curious questions and to enjoy being curious. Always.” Resources Follow: Jenny on LinkedIn Visit: Jenny Garrett Global Read: Equality vs Equity: Tackling Issues of Race in the Workplace
44:55 7/3/23
Decoding and Dealing with Toxic Behaviors
Why do toxic behaviors persist in workplaces despite efforts for a healthier work culture? Find out how to discern healthy behaviors from toxic ones and learn what you can do to cope successfully with toxic relationships and environments. Anna Eliatamby is a clinical psychologist and workplace well-being expert who has played a pivotal role in developing mental health, responsible leadership and well-being strategies for global organizations, including the UN, International Red Cross and Red Crescent, and PwC. She is the Director of HealthyLeadership CIC, a collective that encourages individuals and organizations to foster decency and make positive changes. Anna is also the author of the Decency Journey Series, a collection of compact and practical pocketbooks designed to help individuals flourish in their careers and workplaces.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 1:56 Why do people engage in toxic behavior? 5:22 The combination of toxic behavior and positive intent 8:37 Impacts of toxic behavior 11:32 Toxic behaviors can cause inadvertent self-sabotage 13:44 The difference between holding someone accountable and blaming 16:31 The mindset behind toxic behaviors 18:55 Assessing our own toxic tendencies 25:08 Critical skills and expectations for confronting toxic behaviors 29:14 More techniques for coping with toxic behaviors 32:10 The importance of self-care when coping with toxic behavior 33:28 Practical considerations, and pitfalls, for deciding on a coping strategy 38:14 Key ingredient for outgrowing our own toxic attendances   Anna's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "I think the greatest unmet need is that we must address the negative the toxicity at the same time as we're adding to the positive and teaching people about things like compassion, both are necessary."   What “working with humans” means to Anna “It's a lovely phrase, and I think it is just that to remember that we are human beings, we all are. And that should be the center from which we work. So if we're human we work with compassion, with respect, with decency -- with ourselves and with other people.”   Resources Follow: Anna on LinkedIn Visit: Healthy Leadership CIC Read: the Decency Journey series of books ©Michael Glazer
42:12 6/19/23
Benefits and Realities of Employee-Owned Businesses
Discover the power of employee-ownership as we explore how worker cooperatives are shaping the future of work and providing innovative solutions for customers and meaningful work, autonomy, and a voice in the workplace for workers.   Emi Do is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Tokyo University of Agriculture and a co-author of the book "Cooperatives at Work."   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes. Your ratings help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 1:56 What are worker cooperatives? 6:02 Worker coop organizational structures 8:26 Benefits and challenges of being part of a worker cooperative 10:37 Decision-making in worker coops 13:22 "Consensus minus one" 14:47 Are worker coops really innovative? 16:25 The relationship between business owners and employees 19:00 Do people get fired in worker coops? 22:53 The amazing success of Mondragon 25:04 Converting a traditional organization into a worker coop 26:52 Employee-owners succeed where previous management failed   Emi's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "Definitely work life balance. I think worker coops struggle with this as well. It's part of the market economy, there's a certain urgency to everything that requires a timeliness and an ability to meet deadlines that sometimes is not compatible with making sure that you're taking care of [yourself] and that you're able to make sure that your own personal needs are being met. I find this particularly strongly in the consultancy world."   What “working with humans” means to Emi “Showing up as a whole person, I am definitely somebody who is productive, but I'm also somebody who is somebody's partner. I am a daughter. I am a trail runner. I have passions, so I think working with humans means working with a whole person.”   Resources Follow: Emi on LinkedIn Read: Cooperatives at Work  
33:43 6/5/23
Fostering Wellbeing in Hybrid Work
 In a world of hybrid work, it's essential for businesses to humanize their approach and to trust employees to manage their own work well. With disparate team members working across various locations, it's challenging for people to stay motivated and connected. How can we address this?   Oliver Henry is a Co-founder of WorkLifeWell and the Global Head of Health and Wellbeing at easyJet. He has spent the last decade helping multi-national organizations and globally recognized brands design and implement wellbeing and people strategies to create and nurture healthy, happy and productive workplace cultures.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes and write a one-sentence review. Your ratings and reviews help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 1:13 How hybrid work is affecting the way teams interact. 3:36 The link between how we communicate and wellbeing 5:49 How to ensure that communication with a new hires goes well 10:56 Norms for communication in a hybrid environment 12:46 Keeping people connected and motivated when they work remotely 16:01 Shared responsibilities for overcoming hybrid work challenges 18:10 Key ingredients for making wellbeing strategies successful 23:07 Differences between wellbeing wants and needs 28:46 Signals that wellbeing policies are addressing employee needs 32:35 Considerations for getting hybrid work policies right 34:53 3S approach to recognize and respond to diverse wellbeing needs   Oliver's view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "A complete lack of understanding of what people need. There is just no active listening from businesses to colleagues around what is it that actually makes you feel happy and healthy at work.   And now that we know that, we can create a strategy around insight versus assumption. And businesses that get very excited around that word 'health and well-being' or 'diversity and inclusion' or 'sustainability,' and they just jump into the doing, they jump into the activity into wasting time and resource on things that fail to engage and have any impact, versus just pausing, reflecting, and taking time to just understand what people want and what people need and get real clarity around those points.   So, the greatest unmet well-being need is just my business doesn't understand me. They don't really, they're not listening. They can't hear what we're saying. Sometimes they're asking the questions, then they're doing these pulse checks and these engagement surveys, but they're not acting on the back of it. They're asking, but they're not doing. So it's as if I were to sit down with board members or senior leaders and say, 'Tell me what you think the health and wellbeing landscape is like,' you know that this was actually a Deloitte study that came out earlier this year. The opinion of health and well-being that the C-suite have of the business versus the businesses' opinion, are polar opposites. Because it's like they're living in two different worlds. So to me that that is the biggest unmet need is just clarity around culture and people."   What “working with humans” means to Oliver “It's an interesting one, where if we were to flip that to 'humans at work'', or humans working, so humans is the first word, and recognizing that there is simplicity in the complexities of humans. It's a constantly evolving area of focus.   And when we bring in different people, you know, we talk about diversity and inclusion or inclusion and diversity if we take the diversity lens. People have tried to define that, but every single person on this planet is diverse, in fact, right? We all have a different footprint or fingerprint, and brain and psychology, and physiology.   Then, working with humans means we're constantly evolving our approach based on the humans that we are working with. And we're constantly conscious of who it is within our organization that ultimately is here to help us succeed. So how can we help them succeed and feel like they are part of our culture and part of our community, so that we have a thriving business. And that to me is 'working with humans'.”   Resources Follow: Oliver on LinkedIn Visit: WorkLifeWell  
41:21 5/22/23
Unleashing Our Superhuman Potential
How can you achieve more with the capabilities you already have? Learn how to balance high performance and well-being with practical advice for tapping into three sources of inner power: potential, mindset, and physiology.    Jim Steel is an award-winning author, strategist, and consultant who has spent the past two decades helping clients in the UK, Europe and Middle East reach their potential and improve their mental, physical, and emotional well-being. He is also author of new book Unashamedly Superhuman, which is an incisive and eye-opening guide that combines two critical areas: high performance and well-being, and offers practical advice for unlocking our hidden potential.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes and write a one-sentence review. Your ratings and reviews help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 3:25 Authenticity, humility, and well-being as conduits to performance. 6:17 Three internal sources of power: potential, mindset and physiology 11:00 How to tap into inner potential to become stronger 14:03 The EDGE model of performance 20:09 How much time should we spend in high-performance mode? 22:14 Adopting habits for recovery to maintain motivation and avoid burnout 26:26 Using micro-recoveries during the workday vs back-to-back meetings 42:40 Performance = potential - interference 49:11 How self-talk and identity affect performance 54:25 The benefits of cold-water exposure   Jim’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "The greatest area of development is building the mindset in the team that says recovery is part of your High Performance Strategy. Creating a culture where [leaders] support it, encourage it, [and] even incentivize it or reward it is something we should be making a priority."   What “working with humans” means to Jim “Two things come to mind here. The first one is a bit deep. I mean, if you zoom out and look at that question, it's like the essence of life. Is anything more important than working with humans?   It's where everything happens, you know, by working with humans: how we set our benchmarks for success, where we learn and hone our skills, where we develop emotional intelligence. So I don't know that there's anything more important than working with humans in life.   There's something else that comes to mind too. And it's the fact that you use the word “with” specifically. I do this exercise with where [clients are] put into the teams and we create a challenge in the room. And the obvious answer is to collaborate, right? That's the end goal of the exercise. And I've run this particular one when we make it really clear that the obvious answer is to collaborate. [But] people don't collaborate, they go into their silos.   And when I unpack the exercise, the one fundamental thing that got in the way was I said to the room, “let's see who can get there first.” And I create this competition, or at least the illusion of competition. And I'm all for competition. It can drive innovation and creativity. But it depends how you define competition.   So what does competition mean? To conspire against or to conspire with the opposition? I want you to be at your absolute best, because that's going to cause me to play at my best. And I can conspire with you, not against you, in order for us all to win. And, so I like the fact that you asked a question using “with” humans, because that I think is a critical element of what creates high performance within teams.”   Resources Follow: Jim on LinkedIn Read: Unashamedly Superhuman    
69:41 5/8/23
Think Like an Entrepreneur
Dr. John Mullins, London Business School Professor and best-selling author, discusses how anyone – in organizations of all sizes – can put the counter conventional mindsets of entrepreneurs into practice to get ahead in their career development. For more than 20 years, John Mullins has delivered inspirational workshops and executive education programs to members of the world’s leading communities of entrepreneurs – the Young Presidents’ Organization (YPO), The Indus Entrepreneurs (TiE), and Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) – as well as to the angel investor and venture capital communities globally. His latest release is titled Break the Rules!: The Six Counter-Conventional Mindsets of Entrepreneurs That Can Help Anyone Change the World.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes and write a one-sentence review. Your ratings and reviews help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 1:36 The pandemic's effects on the entrepreneurial landscape 5:45 Mindset differences between conventional leaders and entrepreneurs 7:14 Viewing events as opportunities vs risks or threats 9:20 Saying "Yes, we can" in the face of unfamiliar challenges 11:47 How to decide whether to say yes to unfamiliar challenges 16:04 Benefits of adopting a "problem first" mindset 20:57 Deciding when it's time to switch to plan B...or C. 22:29 Don't focus on moving the needle to expand a business. 27:43 Building a business for long-term success.   John’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "If I think about London Business School as a workplace where I work I think the greatest need is one that was caused by the pandemic [by making] us all to go remote and and discover some of the upsides of working from home, of which there are many.   But we've all forgotten about what we lose by not being around the water cooler and not having those chats, hallway conversations and all of what comes with being physically connected to others. I think that's actually a well-being issue.   We need to feel [like we're] part of a culture and that we belong and that we contribute and add value to where we work. And I think those who work only remotely today are going to find it unfulfilling. At some point, in the short term, they'll say, "well, gee, isn't this great, I can walk my dog anytime." There are those who take advantage of the the remote working to do [other] full time jobs, and don't tell anybody that they're doing that.   But I think the people who are working solely remotely at some point are going to say, "you know, this isn't fulfilling enough." And, I think they want to get back to where they're around people more. I think that's the biggest wellbeing challenge we face today."   What “working with humans” means to John “At the end of the day, every every business is a human organization. Entrepreneurs only succeed because of the entrepreneurial teams they build around them. It's not a solo sport. Contrary to the popular perception, it's a team sport.   And, you've got to learn as an entrepreneur, how to motivate other people, you've got to motivate the people who work for you. You've got to motivate customers to buy from you. You've got to motivate suppliers to sell to you. And those are human endeavors. All of them. And they are central to building a successful business of whatever size, lifestyle or otherwise.”   Resources Follow: John on LinkedIn Read: Break the Rules!: The Six Counter-Conventional Mindsets of Entrepreneurs That Can Help Anyone Change the World
37:13 4/24/23
Pressure, Stress and Resilience
Learn how to differentiate between pressure and stress, discover the benefits of resilience-building in teams and organizations, and explore practical methods to increase adaptability and maintain focus in high-pressure situations. Lesley Cooper is the founder and CEO of WorkingWell Limited and the co-author of “Dangerous Waters – Strategies for Improving Wellbeing at Work”. She contributes to TV and radio programs in the UK on the subject of employee wellbeing, including Channel 4’s highly acclaimed documentary “Stressed Out”. Lesley is also a full member of the International Stress Management Association.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes and write a one-sentence review. Your ratings and reviews help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 1:10 The difference between pressure and stress 4:08 How pressure and stress impact performance 10:11 Resiliency is a shared responsibility between employee and employer 13:36 The skills that make up someone's agility 14:50 How to move from "rigid" to "adaptable" in the face of pressure 17:43 Awareness and choosing our responses 21:22 How self-talk plays into our level of resiliency 23:40 Making time for recovery during the workday 25:54 Insights on personal energy management 29:17 Organizational responsibility for building resiliency 31:39 Two modes of being present 34:45 Time management strategy to increase focus and presence 38:47 Balancing accountability and flexibility in leadership   Lesley’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "I'd say the number one thing missing in today's workplace is a focus on the quality of the work environment. We are very focused on training people to be more resilient and helping them recover when they experience burnout, but it's like cleaning up a fish and putting them back in a dirty pond. There's not enough attention given to the toxicity in the work environment that may be contributing to burnout. We need to change that, but right now, the focus is primarily on secondary and tertiary interventions like training and treatment.   On a more specific level, the COVID pandemic and the shift to digital technology has led to a lack of water cooler moments and a greater focus on well-being interventions like products and services. However, there is not enough focus on the people actually doing the work. It's important to talk to the human doing the work, not just the task they're performing. I think this relates to your podcast series on the human aspect of well-being in the workplace.   Unfortunately, we've lost contact with each other, and it's become harder to have those inconsequential conversations that make people feel valued as humans. We tend to just talk about work, and that's a loss because when you employ someone, the whole person comes to work, not just the part that does the job. We should talk to the whole person to promote well-being in the workplace."   What “working with humans” means to Lesley “For me, it is that it's about talking to the human being and not the task.”   Resources Follow: Lesley on LinkedIn Visit: WorkingWell Limited Read: Dangerous Waters – Strategies for Improving Wellbeing at Work
44:35 4/10/23
Better Problem Solving (Rebroadcast)
Problem-solving is a crucial skill for so many jobs, so why aren’t we taught how to do it properly? This conversation dives deep into research-backed process and techniques that help businesspeople and their teams navigate and solve problem better and faster. Arnaud Chevallier is a co-author of Solvable: A Simple Solution to Complex Problems. He is also a Professor of Strategy and decision making at IMD where he prepares executives for the strategic challenges that organizations face in today’s dynamic global marketplace by helping them make better decisions in volatile and uncertain conditions. Arnaud has consulted with multiple organizations across industries, including the United Nations, SAP, STADA, and Shell. Originally aired as episode 73.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes and write a one-sentence review. Your ratings and reviews help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 3:25 Complex and ill-defined problems 5:31 Famous, historical example of solving a symptom and not the cause 9:09 How to effectively frame a problem 11:24 Examples of effective problem framing 12:08 The problem with how companies are framing Return To Office 13:13 Too much vs too little stakeholder engagement 15:58 How much info is needed to frame a problem well 17:09 The value of taking a probabilistic approach 19:39 How to prevent info overload when framing problems 21:55 What differentiates how great teams approach problems 22:57 Engagement is about more than inviting people to the table 26:20 Balancing establishing credibility and showing vulnerability 27:26 Approach for mapping out solutions to problems 31:36 What MECE is and how to apply it in problem solving 34:35 How much mapping is needed for complex problems 36:16 Example of how diverse thinking leads to breakthrough solutions 38:50 Addressing our blind spots in problem solving 41:35 How to agree on evaluation criteria when choosing a solution   Arnaud’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "Stress and and realizing how much stress is crippling us. And I'd say let's start with this. I think there's been a oh, there is an ongoing shift from being 'the tough people' to admitting we don't have all the answers and [admitting we have] vulnerabilities. And when we're in stressful situations, we should be able to speak up and look and ask, 'okay, how do we overcome this?'"   What “working with humans” means to Arnaud “I trained as an engineer, [and as it relates to] problem solving, it's a science. It's also an art. So working with humans, what I love is the fascinating interactions between the science and the art.”   Resources Follow: on LinkedIn and through IMD Read: Solvable: A Simple Solutions to Complex Problems Read: Adam Grant on having a "challenge network" (Knowledge at Wharton)
49:34 3/27/23
Workplace Bullying (Rebroadcast)
Women, as well as high performers in general, are often targeted by workplace bullies as threats, and then driven off their career paths, out of their jobs or out of their companies. This episode explores how to combat bullies and what can be done to drive bullying behavior out of the workplace. Berta Aldrich, is an award-winning C-suite executive turned author, whose first book, Winning the Talent Shift: Three Steps to Unleashing the New High Performance Workplace, earned multiple top ratings by BookAuthority. Originally aired as episode 62.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify or iTunes and write a one-sentence review. Your ratings and reviews help more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 5:03    Scope and other statistics on workplace bullying 7:17    Factors that hold back women and other high performance 9:30    Why having only one woman in the C-suite isn’t enough 11:54 Who are workplace bullies, and why do they bully? 15:53 How bullying impacts high performers 19:01 Bullying and being held back from your first promotion 24:51  Strategies and tactics bullies use to hold back high performers 28:07  Should you involve HR when you’re bullied at work? 29:14  How the bullying strategy of “dropping the seed” works 31:34  Removing bullying behaviors from the workplace 35:33  How to handle disingenuous feedback from a bully manager 40:04  The case for shifting work culture to weed out bullies   What Berta sees as the greatest unmet workplace wellbeing need “Removal of the bullies from the workplace.”   What “working with humans” means to Berta “When I think back to the high performance teams that I’ve had the honor of leading, or now helping other executives formulate their own high performance, it’s the joy that comes from that work. And that is what life and work-life should be about – joy.”
45:27 3/13/23
Pro Advice on Giving Virtual Presentations
How can you take your virtual presentation game to the next level? In this episode, Jack Milner, a communication coach who has trained best-selling professional speakers and Fortune 500 leaders, shares practical advice for giving great virtual presentations and workshops based on his book  Virtual Presentation Mastery: Tips from the coach to some of the world's best speakers.   If you enjoy the show, please rate it on Spotify. Your rating helps more people like you discover the podcast!   Episode Highlights 2:01 Going from being effective in person to being effective virtually 4:31 Adjusting our mindset to present in a virtual environment 6:58 How to convey your authenticity during virtual presentations 11:19 Using "PISA" to lay the foundation for a great virtual presentation 13:31 How to open virtual presentations and workshops 18:38 Techniques for keeping people engaged and motivated 25:41 Energizers you can use in your virtual meetings and presentations 28:23 Preventing and dealing with virtual presentation tech trouble   Jack’s view on the greatest unmet wellbeing need at work today "it's human humor and laughter. And I was thinking about it actually, last night with my family, you know, we were just having dinner together and a lot of laughs. But, there have been times over the last couple of years where that hasn't been the case. And it was a really just good reminder that this is what life is about... I think Tom Peters said [once asked], "if work isn't fun, then why are you doing it?" It should be fun. Or you should try and make it more fun. And you can work hard, you can achieve amazing things and enjoy it. You'll have fun at the same time. And laughter."   What “working with humans” means to Jack “...I meet up with some friends twice a week for a run, and then we go for a coffee. And those two meetings are two of the most important parts of my, my week. And we did that during COVID. And I think it was crucial, actually, to all of us. And we became really good friends through that. And that's a highlight. It's a real highlight of the week, and I'm lucky enough to have a lovely family and sitting with them last night having dinner and laughing. [So,] it's finding more of those moments and realizing it's special. There's a met a friend of mine who works for an insurance company. And he's the one person in the office who's never been fired. I thought [it's because he is] one of those people who comes into a room and everyone just feels happier. He says, "I'm not very good at my job." Clearly, [he] must be very good at something, and that something is really important.”   Resources Visit: Jack's website Stand Up and Deliver Read: Virtual Presentation Mastery  
37:46 2/27/23