Show cover of The Korea Now Podcast

The Korea Now Podcast

Interviewing academics, professionals and other experts, Korea Now is a podcast where Jed Lea-Henry digs into historical and current issues relating to the two Koreas. Jed Lea-Henry's podcast, and other work, can be found at http://www.jedleahenry.org/

Tracks

The Korea Now Podcast #123 – Kathryn Weathersby – ‘Moscow’s Fear of Japan and the Division of Korea’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Kathryn Weathersby. They speak about ‘borderlands’ as places of fear and confrontation, how this phenomenon impacted Russian involvement in the great power struggle over Korea prior to its seizure by Japan in 1905, the patterns that informed Moscow’s actions toward the peninsula, and which ultimately led the Soviet Union and the United States to divide Korea. Kathryn Weathersby is an Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University Washington, DC; Adjunct faculty at Korea University in Seoul, Korea; and Co-founder of the Korean War archive at Korea University. *** The Korea Now Podcast #17 – Kathryn Weathersby – ‘Dividing Korea - Politics, War and Fear’ The Korea Now Podcast #17 – Kathryn Weathersby – ‘Dividing Korea - Politics, War and Fear’ *** The Korea Now Podcast #67 – Kathryn Weathersby – ‘The 1988 Seoul Olympics - Terrorism, Diplomacy and the End of the Cold War’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #67 – Kathryn Weathersby – ‘The 1988 Seoul Olympics - Terrorism, Diplomacy and the End of the Cold War’ (libsyn.com) Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry
66:33 6/28/22
The Korea Now Podcast #122 – Robert Winstanley-Chesters – ‘The Armstrong Affair and Questions of Authorship in Korean Studies’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Robert Winstanley-Chesters. They speak about the plagiarism scandal that surrounded Charles Armstrong and his book ‘Tyranny of the Weak’, the nature of the plagiarism and academic corruption involved, the extraordinarily immoral response from much of the Korean Studies community who chose to defend Armstrong and publicly attack the people making the allegations, the history of such behaviour within the Korean Studies community, as well as deeper questions concerning authorship, co-production, authenticity, intellectual ownership, provenance, truth and objectivity. Robert Winstanley-Chesters is a human geographer, Lecturer at University of Leeds and Bath Spa University, a Teaching Fellow at the University of Edinburgh, and Member of Wolfson College, Oxford, formerly of Birkbeck, University of London, Australian National University and Cambridge University. He is author of “Environment, Politics and Ideology in North Korea” (Lexington, 2014), “Vibrant Matters(s): Fish, Fishing and Community in North Korea and Neighbours” (Springer, 2019) and "New Goddess of Mt Paektu: Myth and Transformation in North Korean Landscape” (Black Halo/Amazon KDP 2020). You can follow Robert’s academic work at: https://anu-au.academia.edu/RobertWinstanleyChesters and Robert Winstanley-Chesters (researchgate.net) * Robert’s article on which this is interview based is: ‘Authorship, Co-Production, Plagiarism: Issues of Origin and Provenance in the Korean Studies Community’ Authorship, Co-Production, Plagiarism: Issues of Origin and Provenance in the Korean Studies Community | Robert Winstanley-Chesters - Academia.edu * The paper by Robert Winstanley-Chesters 'Authorship, Co-Production, Plagiarism: Issues of Origin and Provenance in the Korean Studies Community' is part of a writing and research project led by Professor Vladimir Tikhonov of the University of Oslo and Associate Professor Adam Bohnet of the University of Western Ontario titled 'Unpicking the Hegemonic Threads in the Production of Korean Studies in English: Eurocentrism, Cold War Logics and Questions of Authorship.' This project based at the University of Oslo, in Norway has engaged in a series of workshops and writing sessions between 2019 and 2022 funded by the Academy of Korean Studies 2020 Korean Studies Grant program (AKS-2020-C-16) and the project is grateful for their generous support. Other materials referenced in the interview: *** Revoking a Recommendation by B.R. Myers Revoking a Recommendation — B.R. Myers – Sthele Press *** On Academic Ward Bosses by B.R. Myers On Academic Ward Bosses — B.R. Myers – Sthele Press *** Table of 98 Examples of Source Fabrication, Plagiarism, and Text-Citation Disconnects in Charles K. Armstrong’s Tyranny of the Weak (2013) Tyranny-of-the-Weak_Table-of-98-Cases.pdf (sthelepress.com) Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry
72:05 4/17/22
The Korea Now Podcast #121 – Brad Glosserman – ‘War in Ukraine - Implications for East Asia’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Brad Glosserman. They speak about Russia’s war in Ukraine and its short-to-long term effects for the East Asian region. Brad Glosserman is both the Deputy Director of, and Visiting Professor at, the Tama University Center for Rule Making Strategies, as well as a Senior Advisor for the Pacific Forum. Brad was also the Executive Director of the Pacific Forum for 15 years, and is the author of ‘The Future of U.S.-Korea-Japan Relations: Balancing Values and Interests’, ‘The Japan-South Korea Identity Clash: East Asian Security and the United States’ and ‘Peak Japan: The End of Great Ambitions’ (Amazon; Book Depository). Brad’s regular commentary and opinion pieces can be found at: http://cc.pacforum.org/author/brad_glosserman/ and https://www.japantimes.co.jp/author/int-brad_glosserman/ *** The Korea Now Podcast #103 – Brad Glosserman – ‘The New National Security Economy’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #103 – Brad Glosserman – ‘The New National Security Economy’ (libsyn.com) *** The Korea Now Podcast #66 – Brad Glosserman – ‘Peak Japan’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #66 – Brad Glosserman – ‘Peak Japan’ (libsyn.com) *** The Korea Now Podcast #47 – Brad Glosserman – ‘The Future of Japan-Korea-America Trilateralism’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #47 – Brad Glosserman – ‘The Future of Japan-Korea-America Trilateralism’ (libsyn.com) Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
79:43 3/27/22
The Korea Now Podcast #120 – Meredith Shaw – ‘Antagonisms in South Korean Politics - Anti-Japanism vs. Anti-Communism’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Meredith Shaw. They speak about Meredith’s new article Godzilla vs Pulgasari: Anti-Japanism and Anti-Communism as Dueling Antagonisms in South Korean Politics Godzilla vs Pulgasari: Anti-Japanism and Anti-Communism as Dueling Antagonisms in South Korean Politics | Journal of East Asian Studies | Cambridge Core. Meredith Shaw is an Associate Professor in the Institute of Social Sciences at the University of Tokyo and the managing editor of Social Science Japan Journal. Meredith has worked as a research associate and translator at the Korean Institute of National Unification, and her current research focuses on the analysis of North Korean literature. Her ongoing blog on North Korean literature is available at http://dprklit.blogspot.com/ *** The Korea Now Podcast #36 – Meredith Shaw – ‘The Strong and Prosperous Nation - Understanding North Korea through its literature’ (https://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com/the-korea-now-podcast-36-meredith-shaw-the-strong-and-prosperous-nation-understanding-north-korea-through-its-literature). *** The Korea Now Podcast #92 (Literature Series) – Meredith Shaw – ‘Messages in North Korean Literature’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #92 (Literature Series) – Meredith Shaw – ‘Messages in North Korean Literature’ (libsyn.com) Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry  
75:14 3/15/22
The Korea Now Podcast #119 – Balázs Szalontai – ‘The Chinese-North Korean Relationship’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Balázs Szalontai. They speak about China’s controversial role in North Korea’s economic transformation, Chinese involvement in planning for a potential second Korean war (1965-1967), Chinese attitudes toward confrontational acts by North Korea, and how North Korea has managed to exploit conflicts between China, Japan, and South Korea, while trying to sabotage trilateral cooperation. Balázs Szalontai is a Professor at Korea University, a former-Fulbright Scholar and Visiting Professor at Mongolian International University of Science and Technology, and a former-Research Associate at the Institute for International Education in Seoul. Balázs is the author of ‘Kim Il Sung in the Khrushchev Era: Soviet-DPRK Relations and the Roots of North Korean Despotism, 1953-1964’ and ‘North Korea Caught in Time: Images of War and Reconstruction’. He is also the author of ‘Captives of the Past: The Questions of Responsibility and Reconciliation in North Korea’s Narratives of the Korean War’, and his academic works can be found at: Balazs Szalontai | Korea University, Republic of Korea - Academia.edu *** The Korea Now Podcast #43 – Balázs Szalontai – ‘Memory, Responsibility and Reconciliation - From the Korean War to Denuclearization’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #43 – Balázs Szalontai – ‘Memory, Responsibility and Reconciliation - From the Korean War to Denuclearization’ (libsyn.com) *** The Korea Now Podcast #100 – Balázs Szalontai – ‘History of the North Korean Socio-Political System’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #100 – Balázs Szalontai – ‘History of the North Korean Socio-Political System’ (libsyn.com) *** North Korea between China, Japan, and the ROK, 2012-2016 (PDF) North Korea between China, Japan, and the ROK, 2012-2016 | Balazs Szalontai - Academia.edu *** "If the Neighborhood Catches Fire, One Will Also Come to Grief": Chinese Attitudes toward North Korea's Confrontational Acts, 2009-2014 (PDF) "If the Neighborhood Catches Fire, One Will Also Come to Grief": Chinese Attitudes toward North Korea's Confrontational Acts, 2009-2014 | Balazs Szalontai - Academia.edu *** Whose War Plan Was It? Sino-DPRK Relations and Kim Il Sung’s Militant Strategy, 1965-1967 (PDF) Whose War Plan Was It? Sino-DPRK Relations and Kim Il Sung’s Militant Strategy, 1965-1967 | Balazs Szalontai - Academia.edu *** The Dilemmas of Dependency: China's Controversial Role in North Korea's Economic Transformation (PDF) The Dilemmas of Dependency: China's Controversial Role in North Korea's Economic Transformation | Balazs Szalontai - Academia.edu Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
75:36 2/15/22
The Korea Now Podcast #118 – Vladimir Tikhonov – ‘Korea’s Socialist Century’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Vladimir Tikhonov. They speak about the counter-hegemonic role that socialism has played in South Korea, the history of socialism across the Korean peninsula, the often quiet impact that socialism has had on mainstream politics and policies in South Korea, and how this impact is still poorly understood today. Vladimir Tikhonov is a Professor of Korean Studies at the University of Oslo, and is a historian of Korean history, Korean nationalism and contemporary Korean society and politics. Vladimir received his PhD from Moscow State University, and went on to work and live in Korea for over fifteen years. Pertinent to this podcast, Vladimir is also the author of: ‘A Socialist Century? Socialism as the Main Counter-Hegemonic Ideology of Contemporary Korea’ (PDF) A Socialist Century? Socialism as the Main Counter-Hegemonic Ideology of Contemporary Korea | Vladimir Tikhonov - Academia.edu *** The Korea Now Podcast #60 – Vladimir Tikhonov – ‘Korean Ethno-Nationalism’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #60 – Vladimir Tikhonov – ‘Korean Ethno-Nationalism’ (libsyn.com) Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
77:11 12/15/21
The Korea Now Podcast #117 – Terence Roehrig – ‘South Korea’s Maritime Challenges’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Terence Roehrig. They speak about the issues and challenges that South Korea faces as a maritime nation. Terence Roehrig is a Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College, the author of ‘From Deterrence to Engagement: The U.S. Defense Commitment to South Korea’, ‘Korean Dispute over the Northern Limit Line: Security, Economics, or International Law?’, and ‘Japan, South Korea, and the United States Nuclear Umbrella: Deterrence After the Cold War’. His latest book is: ‘The Dokdo/Takeshima Dispute South Korea, Japan and the Search for a Peaceful Solution’ (Maritime Cooperation in East Asia) The Dokdo/Takeshima Dispute : Paul Huth : 9789004447882 (bookdepository.com) *** The Korea Now Podcast #35 – Terence Roehrig – ‘Nuclear Umbrella - American Military Commitment to the Korean Peninsula’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #35 – Terence Roehrig – ‘Nuclear Umbrella - American Military Commitment to the Korean Peninsula’ (libsyn.com) *** The Korea Now Podcast #31 – Terence Roehrig – ‘Conflict at Sea - The Korean Northern Limit Line’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #31 – Terence Roehrig – ‘Conflict at Sea - The Korean Northern Limit Line’ (libsyn.com)  Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
65:18 12/6/21
The Korea Now Podcast #116 – David Tizzard – ‘Squid Game’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with David Tizzard. They speak about the Netflix series Squid Game. David Tizzard has a Ph.D. in Korean Studies. He is a social/cultural commentator and musician who has lived in Korea for nearly two decades. He is also the host of the Korea Deconstructed podcast, which can be found online, and a columnist at the Korea Times, amongst much more. David’s Korea Times column: The Korea Times - Home Korea Deconstructed: Korea Deconstructed - YouTube   Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
98:06 10/20/21
The Korea Now Podcast #115 – Stephen Nagy – ‘The China Challenge’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Stephen Nagy. They speak about the challenges and implications of the rise of China, the need to counter this with Indo-Pacific strategic planning, the geopolitical issues surrounding trade and sovereignty in the South China Sea, how middle powers should deal with difficult issues such as the status of Taiwan and Hong Kong, Chinese regional revisionism and its dangerous implications, and what China ultimately wants and how it will affect the region as well as the globe. Stephen Nagy is a Distinguished Fellow at Canada's Asia Pacific Foundation (APF), a Fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute (CGAI), and an appointed China expert with Canada’s China Research Partnership. Stephen is currently a Senior Associate Professor in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the International Christian University, Tokyo. He was selected for the 2018 Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) AILA Leadership Fellowship in Washington, and has published widely in both peer-reviewed journals and popular media. You can follow Stephen’s writing, and access the research sources for this podcast at: https://www.japantimes.co.jp/author/stephen-r-nagy/, http://icu.academia.edu/StephenRobertNagy and http://stephenrobertnagy.academia.edu/ *** The Korea Now Podcast #39 – Stephen Nagy – ‘Regionalism, Failed Summits and the View from Japan’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #39 – Stephen Nagy – ‘Regionalism, Failed Summits and the View from Japan’ (libsyn.com) *** The Korea Now Podcast #75 – Stephen Nagy – ‘Coronavirus and East Asia - Investigations, Coercion and Middle Power Alliances’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #75 – Stephen Nagy – ‘Coronavirus and East Asia - Investigations, Coercion and Middle Power Alliances’ (libsyn.com) Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
76:23 9/20/21
The Korea Now Podcast #114 (Literature Series) – Youngju Ryu – ‘Torture, Kim Chiha and South Korea’s Difficult Authoritarian Legacy’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Youngju Ryu. They speak about how modern Korean literature has dealt with the nation’s difficult legacy of authoritarian violence and suppression, how torture and the morality/immorality attached to it is written and described, the challenges of post-authoritarian accountability, the life and significance of the poet Kim Chiha, his lionization within the Korean democratization movement, his imprisonment and the type of Korean nationalism he wrote into his poetry, and the way he shifted from “martyrdom to apostasy” in the minds of many people when he criticized the continued activism of Korean youths after his release from prison. Youngju Ryu is an Associate Professor of modern Korean literature at the University of Michigan. She is a specialist of modern Korean literature with research interests in politics and aesthetics of protest, cultures of authoritarianism, and mediatized publics in modern Korea. Her first book published by the University of Hawai’i Press in 2016 as Writers of the Winter Republic: Literature and Resistance in Park Chung Hee’s Korea, was selected as one of the “Best Books of 2016” by Foreign Affairs and received the 2018 Association for Asian Studies James Palais Book Prize. Youngju is also the editor of Cultures of Yusin: South Korea in the 1970s, published by the University of Michigan Press in 2018. *** Writers of the Winter Republic: Literature and Resistance in Park Chung Hee's Korea Writers of the Winter Republic : Youngju Ryu : 9780824839871 (bookdepository.com) *** Cultures of Yusin: South Korea in the 1970s Cultures of Yusin : Youngju Ryu : 9780472053964 (bookdepository.com) *** The Catcher in the Loft, by Un-yong Ch'on, translated by Bruce Fulton and Ju-Chan Fulton The Catcher in the Loft : Un-yong Ch'on : 9781949933055 (bookdepository.com) Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
71:04 9/13/21
The Korea Now Podcast #113 (Literature Series) – Chizuko Allen – ‘Choe Nam-son - Youth Magazines and Global Korea’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Chizuko Allen. They speak about the life of Choe Nam-son, the difficulties of publishing during the Japanese colonial era, the youth magazines that he managed to launch and distribute at this time, the special branch of globalized nationalism he championed, the language nationalism that he pioneered through his magazines, and his legacy today within modern Korea. Chizuko Allen is an associate specialist in the Department of Asian Studies and the School of Pacific & Asian Studies within the College of Arts, Languages & Letters at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. Her research interests include modern Korean intellectual history and ancient Korea's relations with Japan. She is also the author of The Making of Korea in East Asia: A Korean History The Making of Korea in East Asia : Chizuko T. Allen : 9781516531769 (bookdepository.com) *** Ch’oe Nam-so˘n’s Youth Magazines and Message of a Global Korea in the Early Twentieth Century (PDF) Choe Nam sons Youth Magazines and Message of a Global Korea in the Early Twentieth Century | Chizuko Allen - Academia.edu Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
63:16 9/7/21
The Korea Now Podcast #112 (Literature Series) – Ksenia Chizhova – ‘Women Calligraphers in Late Choson Korea’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Ksenia Chizhova. They speak about the practice of calligraphy in late Choson Korea, the highly aestheticized craft and the social importance attached to it, the differences between traditionally male and female calligraphy, the meticulous training processes involved, the different moral and character insights that the practice was said to offer unto their authors, the male domination of the practice in terms of public presence and prestige, and the niche that women calligraphers claimed for themselves often within the private domain. Ksenia Chizhova is Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies Director of Undergraduate Studies at Princeton University.  Her areas of interest are history of emotions, family, and scriptural practices in Korea, from the late eighteenth to the twentieth century. Her first manuscript, Kinship Novels of Early Modern Korea: Between Genealogical Time and the Domestic Everyday, published by Columbia University Press, looks into the rise and fall of the lineage novel (kamun sosŏl), which narrated the interstices of Korea’s kinship system and foregrounded the genealogical subject—a structure of identity defined by kinship obligation and understood as socialization of the emotional self. Lineage novels, which constituted the core of elite vernacular Korean literature and circulated between the late 17th and early 20thcenturies, configure Korean kinship as a series of clashes between genders and generations, which produce unruly, violent emotions. *** Kinship Novels of Early Modern Korea : Between Genealogical Time and the Domestic Everyday Kinship Novels of Early Modern Korea : Ksenia Chizhova : 9780231187817 (bookdepository.com) *** Bodies of Texts: Women Calligraphers and the Elite Vernacular Culture in Late Choso˘n Korea (1392–1910) Bodies of Texts: Women Calligraphers and the Elite Vernacular Culture in Late Chosŏn Korea (1392–1910) | The Journal of Asian Studies | Cambridge Core Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
59:00 8/22/21
The Korea Now Podcast #111 (Literature Series) – Michael Kim – ‘The Trouble with Christian Publishing in Colonial Korea’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Michael Kim. They speak about the history of the Christian Publishing Company (Changmunsa), the difficulties of operating during the Japanese colonial period, the complexities of the colonial publishing market, the movement among Korean Christians to achieve more cultural autonomy from Western missionaries, and the unique insights that can be gained from the diaries and letters of Yun Ch’iho (1864–1945). Michael Kim is a Professor of Korean History at Yonsei University’s Graduate School of International Studies in Seoul, Korea. His research primarily focuses on colonial Korea, and he has published on various aspects of urban culture, print culture, colonial economy, Korean collaboration, migration, and wartime mobilization. He is co-editor, along with Michael Schoenhals and Yong Woo Kim, of Mass Dictatorship and Modernity (Palgrave, 2013). *** The Korea Now Podcast #99 – Michael Kim – ‘Industrial Warriors and Recognizing Religions - Everyday Life in Colonial Korea’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #99 – Michael Kim – ‘Industrial Warriors and Recognizing Religions - Everyday Life in Colonial Korea’ (libsyn.com) *** The Trouble with Christian Publishing: Yun Ch'iho (1865–1945) and the Complexities of Cultural Nationalism in Colonial Korea (6) (PDF) "The Trouble with Christian Publishing: Yun Ch’iho (1865–1945) and the Complexities of Cultural Nationalism in Colonial Korea," Journal of Korean Religions, Volume 9, Number 2, October 2018, pp. 139-172. | Michael Kim - Academia.edu *Michael Kim’s academic research can be found at: Michael Kim | Yonsei University - Academia.edu Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
64:39 8/16/21
The Korea Now Podcast #110 (Literature Series) – Sixiang Wang – ‘The Politics of Language in Early Choson Korea’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Sixiang Wang. They speak about the exchanges between Choson Korea (1392-1910) and Ming China (1368-1644), the Korean envoys and interpreters who mediated between the two dynasties, the need of these interpreters to master spoken Chinese, the extensive body of language materials that were created for this purpose, and the invention of the Hangul script to systematically represent the phonology of Sino-Korean. Sixiang Wang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at UCLA. He teaches courses in Korea’s premodern history as well as the history of cultural and intellectual interactions in early modern East Asia. As a historian of Choson Korea and early modern East Asia, his research interests also include comparative perspectives on early modern empire, the history of science and knowledge, and issues of language and writing in Korea’s cultural and political history. His current book project, “The Cultural Politics of Universal Empire: Knowledge and Diplomacy in Early Choson Korea 1392–1592” reconstructs the cultural strategies the Korean court deployed in its interactions with the Ming. Its examination of poetry-writing, gift-giving, diplomatic ceremony, and historiography underscores the centrality of ritual and literary practices in producing diplomatic norms, political concepts, and ideals of sovereignty in the construction of a shared, regional interstate order. Sixiang Wang received his PhD from the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures of Columbia University. He was also a Mellon Scholar of the Humanities at Stanford University and the Moon Family Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. *** The Sounds of Our Country: Interpreters, Linguistic Knowledge and the Politics of Language in Early Chosŏn Korea (1392–1592) (24) (PDF) The Sounds of Our Country: Interpreters, Linguistic Knowledge, and the Politics of Language in Early Chosŏn Korea | Sixiang Wang (王思翔) - Academia.edu *** Sixiang Wang’s academic publications can be found at: Sixiang Wang – Historian, East Asia and Korea (chosonhistory.org) Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
61:41 8/2/21
The Korea Now Podcast #109 (Literature Series) – Daniel Pieper– ‘Redemption and Regret in the Writings of James Scarth Gale’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Daniel Pieper. They speak about James Scarth Gale and the significance of his translation work, the extraordinary upheaval and change that he witnessed as a missionary in late-Choson Korea, how he saw the changing face of Korea and the importance of Korean literature, the accusations that Gale was a pro-Japanese sympathiser during the colonial period, Gale’s view of the existing religious landscape inside Korea, how he balanced a deep affection for Old Korea whilst also seeking to modernise and convert it to Christianity, and how we should understand Gale’s legacy today both inside and outside of Korea. Daniel Pieper is a Lecturer in Korean Studies at Monash University. He received his PhD in Asian Studies from the University of British Columbia. His current research focuses on the emergence of vernacular Korean as a discrete subject in the modern school, the textual differentiation process of cosmopolitan Hanmun and vernacular Korean, and the role of language ideology in directing language standardization in pre-colonial and colonial-era Korea. His most recent book is titled Redemption and Regret: Modernizing Korea in the Writings of James Scarth Gale and examines themes of vernacularization, linguistic modernity, and literary translation in the missionary’s unpublished writings. *** Redemption and Regret: The Ambivalence of Korean Modernization in the Writings of James Scarth Gale, Missionary to Korea (1888-1927) Redemption and Regret (utpdistribution.com) *** The Korea Now Podcast #90 (Literature Series) – Daniel Pieper– ‘Hangul - The History, Evolution and Nationalism of the Korean Language’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #90 (Literature Series) – Daniel Pieper– ‘Hangul - The History, Evolution and Nationalism of the Korean Language’ (libsyn.com) *** Daniel Pieper’s academic publications can be found at:  https://wustl.academia.edu/DanielPieper Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
61:55 7/26/21
The Korea Now Podcast #108 (Literature Series) – Ross King – ‘Sinographic Cosmopolis’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Ross King. They speak about the landscape of pre-modern Korean literature, the complex ecology of spoken and written language that existed, the broader East Asian cultural formation of which Korea was a part, the problems with descriptors such as ‘diglossia’ and ‘Chinese’ that are often used in Korean literary research today, why the phrase ‘Sinographic Cosmopolis’ is much more appropriate in terms of accuracy and reach, the language based nationalism of modern Korea and how this changes how Korean literary tradition is viewed, and importantly the future of Korean literature as well as that of Korean Studies departments in universities today. Ross King is a Professor of Korean language and literature at the University of British Columbia. He completed his B.A. in Linguistics at Yale and his doctorate in Linguistics (Korean) at Harvard. Ross taught Korean language and linguistics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, from 1990 to 1994, before accepting his current position. Ross's research interests range from Korean historical grammar, dialectology and pedagogy to the language, culture and history of the ethnic Korean minority in the former Soviet Union. He was also the founding Dean of the Korean Language Village at Concordia Language Villages, from 1999-2013, a Korean language and culture summer immersion program for young people ages 7 to 18 that is based in northern Minnesota. *** The Korea Now Podcast #80 (Literature Series) – Ross King – ‘Korean-to-English Literary Translation - A Critical Examination’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #80 (Literature Series) – Ross King – ‘Korean-to-English Literary Translation - A Critical Examination’ (libsyn.com) *** The Korea Now Podcast #107 (Literature Series) – Ross King – ‘James Scarth Gale - Life, Translations, and Lost Works’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #107 (Literature Series) – Ross King – ‘James Scarth Gale - Life, Translations, and Lost Works’ (libsyn.com) *** Ross King’s academic publications can be found at: https://ubc.academia.edu/RossKing Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
75:09 6/29/21
The Korea Now Podcast #107 (Literature Series) – Ross King – ‘James Scarth Gale - Life, Translations, and Lost Works’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Ross King. They speak about the life of James Scarth Gale, the significance of Gale’s translation work and how it fit-in with his missionary duties, the libraries of Korean literature that he amassed, how he saw the changing face of Korea and Korean literature, Gale’s legacy today both inside and outside of Korea, and importantly the extraordinary research that Ross has done tracking down Gale’s lost archives. Ross King is a Professor of Korean language and literature at the University of British Columbia. He completed his B.A. in Linguistics at Yale and his doctorate in Linguistics (Korean) at Harvard. Ross taught Korean language and linguistics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, from 1990 to 1994, before accepting his current position. Ross's research interests range from Korean historical grammar, dialectology and pedagogy to the language, culture and history of the ethnic Korean minority in the former Soviet Union. He was also the founding Dean of the Korean Language Village at Concordia Language Villages, from 1999-2013, a Korean language and culture summer immersion program for young people ages 7 to 18 that is based in northern Minnesota. *** The Korea Now Podcast #80 (Literature Series) – Ross King – ‘Korean-to-English Literary Translation - A Critical Examination’ (The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #80 (Literature Series) – Ross King – ‘Korean-to-English Literary Translation - A Critical Examination’ (libsyn.com)). *** Ross King’s academic publications can be found at: https://ubc.academia.edu/RossKing Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
64:58 6/20/21
The Korea Now Podcast #106 – Hyunhee Park – ‘The History of Soju’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Hyunhee Park. They speak about Hyunhee’s book Soju: A Global History, the Eurasian roots of distilled liquors with arak and shaojiu, the Mongol origins of soju and the technology transfers to Koryo-Korea, how soju was distilled and the early role it played in Koryo, the increased popularity of soju during the Choson dynasty and the rise of its cultural significance, the impact of the Japanese colonial era and how modernisation produced in industrial soju to compete with traditional soju, the international connections that soju has with countries such as Japan and Mexico, and the important place that soju holds today in terms of both its popularity and as a national Korean icon; championed at home and exported abroad as soft power. Hyunhee Park is an Associate Professor of History at the City University of New York, John Jay College of Criminal Justice and CUNY Graduate Center. A native of South Korea, she received her BA in Asian and Western history at Seoul National University in 1997, her MA in East Asian Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2003, and her Ph.D. in history at Yale University in 2008. She specializes in the history of cross-cultural contacts in East Asia, the Islamic world, the Mongol Empire, and global intellectual history focusing on information/knowledge transfers including geographical knowledge, foodways, and distillation. Her book Mapping the Chinese and Islamic Worlds: Cross-Cultural Exchange in Pre-Modern Asia explores medieval contact and exchange between the Islamic World and China by utilizing geographic and cartographic information. And pertinent to this podcast Hyunhee is the author of ‘Soju: A Global History’ (https://www.bookdepository.com/Soju-Hyunhee-Park/9781108842013?ref=grid-view&qid=1621081750597&sr=1-3). Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
90:35 5/20/21
The Korea Now Podcast #105 – Ben Young – ‘Guns, Guerillas, and the Great Leader’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Ben Young. They speak about Ben’s new book Guns, Guerillas, and the Great Leader: North Korea and the Third World, how and why North Korea sought allies around the Third World during the Cold War period, what these alliances looked like and consisted of, how the changing internal politics of North Korea affected these partnerships, how North Korea saw these international relationships as a means to sell its cult of personality, to acquire hard currency, to cause unrest for America and its allies, and to compete against South Korea for United Nations votes and international recognition, all with a deep dive into the case studies of Cuba and Palestine. Ben Young is currently an Assistant Professor at Dakota State University, and soon to be Assistant Professor of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness at Virginia Commonwealth University. Ben has been a postdoctoral fellow at the U.S Naval War College, as well as a CSIS NextGen Korea Scholar. Ben achieved his PhD in Asian history at George Washington University, with a dissertation focussed on North Korea’s global outreach and international diplomacy during the Cold War. He has been a Fulbright junior researcher in Seoul, South Korea, and his work has been published in The Washington Post, The Guardian, Reuters, and NKnews. Pertinent to this podcast, Ben is the author of: Guns, Guerillas, and the Great Leader: North Korea and the Third World (Guns, Guerillas, and the Great Leader : Benjamin R. Young : 9781503627635 (bookdepository.com) and Guns, Guerillas, and the Great Leader: North Korea and the Third World | Benjamin R. Young (sup.org)). *** The Korea Now Podcast #10 – Ben Young – ‘Friends in Strange Places - Cold War Allies’ https://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com/the-korea-now-podcast-10-ben-young-friends-in-strange-places-cold-war-allies. ***The Korea Now Podcast #77 – Ben Young – ‘The 1976 DMZ Axe Murder Incident - Emotion, Anger and Fear in American-North Korean Relations’ The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #77 – Ben Young – ‘The 1976 DMZ Axe Murder Incident - Emotion, Anger and Fear in American-North Korean Relations’ (libsyn.com) Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
65:18 4/28/21
The Korea Now Podcast #104 – Donald Baker – ‘Korean Confucianism’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Donald Baker. They speak about the history of Korean Confucianism, the rise of Confucianism and the ‘privatization’ of Buddhism in the Chosŏn dynasty, what differentiates Korean from Chinese Confucianism, the metaphysical debates between the Toegye and Yulgok factions and how this division defined the course of Korean Confucianism, the emergence of Tasan Chŏng Yagyong and the new reading of Confucianism that he introduced, the Social, political, ethical, and hierarchical structures involved, the transformation of Confucianism in modern-day Korea, and how it has lost most of its metaphysical underpinnings. Donald Baker is a Professor in Korean History and Civilization at the University of British Columbia. He received his Ph.D. in Korean history from the University of Washington and has taught at UBC since 1987. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on Korean history and thought (religion, philosophy, and pre-modern science). In addition, he teaches a graduate seminar on the reproduction of historical trauma, in which he leads graduate students in an examination of traumatic events in Asia in the 20th century. He was a co-editor of the Sourcebook of Korean Civilization and editor of Critical Readings on Korean Christianity.  He is also the author of Chosŏn hugi yugyo wa ch’ǒnjugyo ŭi taerip (The Confucian confrontation with Catholicism in the latter half of the Joseon dynasty) and Korean Spirituality (University of Hawaii Press, 2008). In 2008, he was awarded the Tasan prize for his research on Tasan Chŏng Yagyong, a writer and philosopher in Korea in the 18th and 19th centuries. In 2013 he was asked by the National Institute of Korean History to serve as the chairperson of the International Advisory Committee for the English Translation of the Annals of the Chosŏn Dynasty. *Pertinent to this podcast Don is also the author of the forthcoming book: How to be Moral: Tasan Chŏng Yagyong’s reading of the Zhongyong. **You can find the articles referenced in this podcast (as well as follow Don’s ongoing academic work) at: Donald Baker | University of British Columbia - Academia.edu and Donald Baker - Department of Asian Studies (ubc.ca) *** The Korea Now Podcast #72 – Donald Baker – ‘The Religious Landscape in South Korea’ (The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #72 – Donald Baker – ‘The Religious Landscape in South Korea’ (libsyn.com)). Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
82:38 4/19/21
The Korea Now Podcast #103 – Brad Glosserman – ‘The New National Security Economy’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Brad Glosserman. They speak about Brad’s recent and ongoing work on the new national security economy, the changing global realities and how countries will need to adapt, the importance that governments such as South Korea and Japan recognise these new national security economy issues and integrate them into their broader defence policies, how this fits into the new superpower conflict between America and China, the challenges presented to East Asia by the rise of China, the prospects for multilateralism as a means to mitigate such dangers, and importantly what businesses, governments, as well as citizens, will need to do to prepare for this new national security economy. Brad Glosserman is both the Deputy Director of, and Visiting Professor at, the Tama University Center for Rule Making Strategies, as well as a Senior Advisor for the Pacific Forum. Brad was also the Executive Director of the Pacific Forum for 15 years, and is the author of ‘The Future of U.S.-Korea-Japan Relations: Balancing Values and Interests’, ‘The Japan-South Korea Identity Clash: East Asian Security and the United States’ and ‘Peak Japan: The End of Great Ambitions’ (Amazon; Book Depository). Brad’s regular commentary and opinion pieces can be found at: http://cc.pacforum.org/author/brad_glosserman/ and https://www.japantimes.co.jp/author/int-brad_glosserman/ Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry  
67:23 3/28/21
The Korea Now Podcast #102 – Thomas Duvernay – ‘Sinmiyangyo - The 1871 Conflict Between the United States and Korea’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Thomas Duvernay. They speak about Thomas’ new book Sinmiyangyo: The 1871 Conflict Between the United States and Korea, the historical background and context of the battle, the original misunderstandings that sparked the conflict, how the conflict progressed, the nature of the fighting and the military technology involved, how the important historical sites look today, and the long-term impact of the conflict on both Korea and America as well as the broader East Asian region. Thomas Duvernay has a doctorate in Korean studies and is a professor at Yeungnam University in Gyeongsan, Korea, where he teaches Korean history and English. His main historical focus is on the late Joseon dynasty of Korea, with an emphasis on the 1871 military action between the United States and Korea, which he has been researching since the mid-1990s. He campaigned for years for the return of the Korean general’s flag that was captured by U.S. naval forces in the action, and was housed at the U.S. Naval Academy Museum until it was returned in 2007. Besides writing about the 1871 action in many journal articles, he is also the author of a book on Korean traditional archery, which he has practiced since 1993. He has lived in Korea with his family since 1989, after first living in the country in 1984. His wife, Moon-ok Lee, is a Korean high school English teacher, and his son, Nick, is a PhD professor at the Hankuk University of Foreign Studies. *** Sinmiyangyo: The 1871 Conflict Between the United States and Korea (https://www.amazon.com/Sinmiyangyo-Conflict-Between-United-States-ebook/dp/B08BF9J9HB/ref=sr_1_1). Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
82:12 1/31/21
The Korea Now Podcast #101 (Literature Series) – Bruce Fulton and Ju-Chan Fulton – ‘One Left - The Comfort Women Novel’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton. They speak about Bruce and Ju-Chan’s translation of Kim Soom’s novel One Left, the difficult subject matter of Korean comfort women and how the author deals with this, the lingering emotions of guilt and shame, the challenges of dealing with such intense trauma, the failures of Korean society to assist these women, the translation process for the novel and the complications involved in finding a publisher, the creative choices that Kim Soom made and the extraordinary place that this book holds within the landscape of Korean literature. Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton have translated numerous works of modern Korean fiction. They have received awards and critical acclaim for their translations of Korean fiction, including Words of Farewell: Stories by Korean Women Writers. They were awarded the first National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellowship for a Korean literary work, as well as an American PEN Hein Translation Grant for One Left. They are also the translators of Wayfarer, The Human Jungle, Sunset: A Ch’ae Manshik Reader, Lost Souls: Stories by Hwang Sun-wŏn, The Dwarf and The Catcher in the Loft, amongst many others. *** ‘One Left: A Novel’ by Kim Soom. Translated by Bruce Fulton and Ju-Chan Fulton (https://uwapress.uw.edu/book/9780295747668/one-left/ or One Left : Kim Soom : 9780295747668 (bookdepository.com) or Amazon.com: One Left: A Novel (9780295747668): Soom, Kim, Fulton, Bruce, Fulton, Ju-Chan, Oh, Bonnie: Books). Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
83:15 1/12/21
The Korea Now Podcast #100 – Balázs Szalontai – ‘History of the North Korean Socio-Political System’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Balázs Szalontai. They speak about the origins and the evolution that occurred with in the North Korean socio-political system from 1945 to 1994 with the death of Kim Il-sung, the impact of Japanese colonial rule, the creation of this system under Soviet occupation, the impact of significant events such as the Korean War, the factionalism and in-fighting that happened, the purges and the eventual dynastic succession, and importantly why the North Korean socio-political system looks the way it does today and why it has been able to hold onto power for so long. Balázs Szalontai is a Professor at Korea University, a former-Fulbright Scholar and Visiting Professor at Mongolian International University of Science and Technology, and a former-Research Associate at the Institute for International Education in Seoul. Balázs is the author of ‘Kim Il Sung in the Khrushchev Era: Soviet-DPRK Relations and the Roots of North Korean Despotism, 1953-1964’ and ‘North Korea Caught in Time: Images of War and Reconstruction’. He is also the author of ‘Captives of the Past: The Questions of Responsibility and Reconciliation in North Korea’s Narratives of the Korean War’, and his academic works can be found at: Balazs Szalontai | Korea University, Republic of Korea - Academia.edu *** The Evolution of the North Korean Socio-Political System, 1945-1994 ((DOC) The Evolution of the North Korean Socio-Political System, 1945-1994 | Balazs Szalontai - Academia.edu). *** Weathering the Storm, Toppled by the Storm: North Korea's Non-transition Compared with the Transitions of Romania and Albania, 1989-1991 ((PDF) Weathering the Storm, Toppled by the Storm: North Korea's Non-transition Compared with the Transitions of Romania and Albania, 1989-1991 | Balazs Szalontai - Academia.edu). *** Immunity to Resistance? State-Society Relations and Political Stability in North Korea in a Comparative Perspective ((PDF) Immunity to Resistance? State-Society Relations and Political Stability in North Korea in a Comparative Perspective | Balazs Szalontai and C. Changyong - Academia.edu). *** The Wilson Center's North Korea International Documentation Project (https://www.wilsoncenter.org/program/north-korea-international-documentation-project). Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
99:43 1/3/21
The Korea Now Podcast #99 – Michael Kim – ‘Industrial Warriors and Recognizing Religions - Everyday Life in Colonial Korea’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Michael Kim. They speak about the arrival and place of Western missionaries in Korea before Japanese colonisation, the confrontations and accommodations that occurred between the missionaries and the colonial state, the system of ‘officially’ recognising religions within colonial Korea, and how the missionaries became institutionalised through social work; they also speak about the struggles that the Japanese war-machine had in keeping-up industrial production, the ways in which colonial Korea was seen as a potential new source of this production, the creation of military awards (industrial warriors) for workers as a reward and incentive for this, the ways in which Koreans were coerced and recruited to industrial labour, the type of ideological persuasion and material incentives used, and the elaborate ways that the colonial state sought to control and restructure everyday life. Michael Kim is Associate Professor of Korean History at Yonsei University’s Graduate School of International Studies in Seoul, Korea. His research primarily focuses on colonial Korea, and he has published on various aspects of urban culture, print culture, colonial economy, Korean collaboration, migration, and wartime mobilization. He is co-editor, along with Michael Schoenhals and Yong Woo Kim, of Mass Dictatorship and Modernity (Palgrave, 2013). *Michael Kim’s academic research can be found at: Michael Kim | Yonsei University - Academia.edu *** Industrial Warriors: Labour Heroes and Everyday Life in Wartime Colonial Korea, 1937-1945 ((PDF) •"Industrial Warriors: Labour Heroes and Everyday Life in Wartime Colonial Korea, 1937-1945” in Alf Ludtke ed., Mass Dictatorship: Collusion and Evasion in Everyday Life (Palgrave 2016), 126-146. | Michael Kim - Academia.edu). *** The Politics of Officially Recognizing Religions and the Expansion of Urban ‘Social Work’ in Colonial Korea ((PDF) •“The Politics of Officially Recognizing Religions and the Expansion of Urban ‘Social Work’ in Colonial Korea,” Journal of Korean Religions Vol. 6, No. 2 (October 2016), 69-98. | Michael Kim - Academia.edu). *** Smoking for Empire: The Production and Consumption of Tobacco in Colonial Korea 1910-1945 ((PDF) •"Smoking for Empire: The Production and Consumption of Tobacco in Colonial Korea 1910-1945," Seoul Journal of Korean Studies, Vol 29, no. 2 (December 2016), 305-326. | Michael Kim - Academia.edu). Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
84:26 12/27/20
The Korea Now Podcast #98 – Albert Park – ‘The History and Politics of Agrarian Life in Korea’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Albert Park. They speak about the history of agriculture in Korea, the important place that farmers traditionally held within the economy and the society, what agrarian life in Korea has looked like and how it has changed, the impact of colonial rule and modernisation, the introduction of cooperative models, the role of government and the strained power-dynamic between them and the farming sector, the New Village Movement (NVM, Saemaul undong), Minjung Ideology, and the future of agriculture and environmentalism in Korea. Albert Park is the Bank of America Associate Professor of Pacific Basin Studies at Claremont McKenna College. As a historian of modern Korea and East Asia, his current research project focuses on the roots of environmentalism in modern Korean history and its relationship to locality and local autonomy. Albert is the Co-Principal Investigator of EnviroLab Asia - a Henry Luce Foundation - funded initiative at the Claremont Colleges ($1.4 million award) that carries out research on environmental issues in Asia through a cross disciplinary lens. He is also the author of ‘Building a Heaven on Earth: Religion, Activism and Protest in Japanese Occupied Korea’ and is the co-editor of ‘Encountering Modernity: Christianity and East Asia’. *** The Korea Now Podcast #51 – Albert Park – ‘The Rise of Christianity in Modern Korea’ (The Korea Now Podcast: The Korea Now Podcast #51 – Albert Park – ‘The Rise of Christianity in Modern Korea’ (libsyn.com)). ***Albert Park’s research can be found at: Albert L Park | Claremont McKenna College - Academia.edu and apark@cmc.edu | Claremont McKenna College Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
67:47 12/21/20
The Korea Now Podcast #97 – Tycho van der Hoog – ‘North Korea’s Presence in Africa’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Tycho van der Hoog. They speak about the National Heroes’ Acre monuments in Namibia and Zimbabwe, how these North Korean-built monuments ended up there, the history and extent of such North Korean influence and presence in southern Africa, the public history and political culture that ties such countries to North Korea, and importantly how (and why) the history of the liberation movements – and how it has been manipulated – in these countries explains their deep international connections to this day. Tycho van der Hoog is a PhD candidate at the African Studies Centre Leiden, he holds a research master’s degree in African Studies and a master’s degree in history from Leiden University. Tycho previously worked at the Centre for Frugal Innovation in Africa and lectured at the Leiden University Institute for Area Studies (LIAS), and is the author of ‘Monuments of power: the North Korean origin of nationalist monuments in Namibia and Zimbabwe’ and ‘Breweries, Politics and Identity: The History Behind Namibian Beer’. *** Monuments of power: the North Korean origin of nationalist monuments in Namibia and Zimbabwe (https://www.ascleiden.nl/news/monuments-power-north-korean-origin-nationalist-monuments-namibia-and-zimbabwe). Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
72:49 11/22/20
The Korea Now Podcast #96 – John Bocskay – ‘A Walking Tour of the United Nations Memorial Cemetery in Busan, Korea’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with John Bocskay. They take a walking tour of the United Nations Memorial Cemetery in Busan while speaking about the construction and maintenance of the cemetery, the design and its purpose, the important landmarks, the unique history of the site as the only United Nations cemetery in the world, and the way in which it honours the history of the Korean War and the memories of the soldiers who fought and died during its battles. John Bocskay hails from Westchester County, New York, and has called Busan, South Korea home for 20 years. Since 2017 he has worked at the United Nations Memorial Cemetery in Korea as the Director of International Affairs. *** Webpage for the United Nations Memorial Cemetery in Korea (https://www.unmck.or.kr/eng/main/). Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
87:40 11/15/20
The Korea Now Podcast #95 – Leighanne Yuh – ‘The Opening of the Late-Choson Dynasty – Confucian Traditions, Kabo Reforms, and the Introduction of Western-Style Learning’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Leighanne Yuh. They speak about the tumult and geopolitical pressures within the Late-Choson dynasty, the growing influence of foreign powers, the forced opening of the country to international trade, the tensions between the old Confucian order and the need to rapidly reform, the motivations and concerns that led to the introduction of Western-style education, the reach and impact of the Kabo Reforms, and how deeply this change in education and outlook impacted the country during this period and into the Japanese colonial era. Leighanne Yuh is an assistant professor in the Department of Korean History at Korea University and associate editor of the International Journal of Korean History published by the Centre for Korean Studies at Korea University. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses focusing on the Late Choson, early modern and modern periods. Her primary research interests include intellectual history, modern education and foreign relations in the late nineteenth century. *Link to Leighanne Yuh’s academic work (https://korea.academia.edu/LeighanneYuh). Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
64:53 11/8/20
The Korea Now Podcast #94 – Sean King – ‘German Lessons for Korean Reunification - 30 Year Anniversary’
This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Sean King. They speak about the long running analogy and lessons that are drawn between German reunification and the hopes of Korean reunification, the origins and causes of each division, the impact and placements of these countries within the Cold War order, the degrees to which information and outside influence managed to permeate each country, the important geographical and other differences between East Germany and North Korea as well as between West Germany and South Korea, the different outlooks and ways in which they saw themselves within the global order, the differing ideologies that limit or allow easier pathways to reunification, the roles played by the Soviet Union and China, and importantly the prospects for Korean reunification and the lessons that are available from the German experience. Sean King is a Senior Vice-President at the business advisory firm, Park Strategies, an Affiliated Scholar at the University of Notre Dame’s Liu Institute for Asia & Asian Affairs, and a former-Senior Advisor for Asia in the U.S. & Foreign Commercial Service (USFCS) within the United States Department of Commerce. (Sean King’s staff profile at Park Strategies: http://www.parkstrategies.com/staff_detail.php?id=18). * Korea Herald May 2012 letter to the editor (http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20120516001063). * Stasi (East German secret police) files on North Korea (https://www.wilsoncenter.org/blog-post/north-korea-and-the-stasi-archives). * Radio Brandenburg Berlin Wall (1961-89) historical video vignettes (https://www.the-berlin-wall.com/). *** The Korea Now Podcast #41 – Sean King – ‘From Singapore to Vietnam - The Future of Summit Diplomacy’ (https://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com/the-korea-now-podcast-41-sean-king-from-singapore-to-vietnam-the-future-of-summit-diplomacy). Support via Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/jedleahenry Support via PayPal – https://www.paypal.me/jrleahenry Shop – https://shop.spreadshirt.com.au/JLH-shop/ Support via Bitcoin - 31wQMYixAJ7Tisp773cSvpUuzr2rmRhjaW Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org Libsyn – http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com Youtube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_qg6g1KyHaRXi193XqF6GA Twitter – https://twitter.com/jedleahenry Academia.edu – http://university.academia.edu/JedLeaHenry Research Gate – https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jed_Lea-Henry
71:40 10/3/20

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