Show cover of Mino Bimaadiziwin

Mino Bimaadiziwin

This podcast aims to seek and share insight about Indigenous addictions and mental health issues. It takes a fearless approach in exploring the tough issues with some of the leading voices in Indigenous wellness. thunderbirdpf.org

Tracks

Indigenous Mental Health Pioneer Danny Manitowabi
Guest host Dr Brenda Restoule is joined by one of her Indigenous mental health mentors, Danny Manitowabi, for a fascinating conversation about the lessons learned from his long and impressive career in First Nations mental health.Almost fifty years ago, Danny set up the first mental health clinic in a First Nation. He worked with the community to address a suicide epidemic and later also supported communities in Sioux Lookout to address suicide. Danny went on to work with other local First Nation communities to set up their own mental health services and was responsible for the vision and creation of First Nation mental wellness teams in Canada. And he is a proud member of the Wikwemikong First Nation on Manitoulin.Guest host Dr Brenda Restoule a psychologist, Chief Executive Officer of the First Peoples Wellness Circle and a proud member of the Dokis First Nation and the Eagle Clan in northern Ontario.For more on the work of Thunderbird, please visit our website at thunderbirdpf.orgYou can find us on social media by searching for ThunderbirdPFOur theme music is by Courtney Riley, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation.Mino Bimaadiziwin is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions and the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.
36:25 09/09/2022
Ep 9: Life Promotion with Connor Lafortune and Gabrielle Jubinville
On today’s episode, we’re going to explore life promotion & suicide prevention.Indigenous people in Canada die by suicide at a rate three times the national rate. The rate of suicide among young First Nations is six times higher.Thunderbird has been working with youth to develop a response to suicide, mental wellness and substance use in Indigenous communities. The result is a new resource, called: Strengthening our Connections to Promote Life: A Life Promotion Toolkit by Indigenous Youth. And we’re thrilled to welcome two of the young people who played a key role in putting the toolkit together.Gabrielle Jubinville, is a Hope Ambassador with We Matter, a former US Division One college basketball player and a proud member of the EEE-knock Cree Nation, in Treaty Six territory in Alberta. We reached her in Brandon, Manitoba… where she workes for Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Westman and works at the Women’s Resource Centre.And Connor Lafortune is an Anishinaabek writer, poet, and activist from the Dokis First Nation on Robinson Huron Treaty territory of 1850. He just finished his third year at Nipissing University with a Double Honours Major in Indigenous Studies and Gender Equality and Social Justice with a minor in Legal Studies.You can see the Life Promotion Toolkit on our website, thunderbirdPF.orgYou can also order hard copies there.If you’d like to request a presentation by a member of Thunderbird’s Youth Action Group for Life Promotion, email us at info@thunderbirdPF.orgThere’s also more culturally-safe information to support Life Promotion on one of our websites - wisepractices.caYou can find us on social media by searching for ThunderbirdPFOur theme music is by Courtney Riley, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation.Mino Bimaadiziwin is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions and the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.
34:39 08/04/2022
The Power of Indigenous Languages with Dr. Lorna Williams
Today’s episode is all about language – its connection to our mental, emotional, spiritual & physical wellness. In fact, just look at the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum, on our website, ThunderbirdPF.org and you’ll see that language is considered to be one of the Indigenous social determinants of health. It’s considered as vital to our wellness as access to health care, housing & education. Sherry's guest today, Dr. Lorna Wanosts’a7 Williams, is an inspiration in her fearless and determined pursuit of the power of Indigenous languages. For more than 50 years, Dr. Williams of the Lil’wat First Nation has been an Indigenous educator and language specialist. A survivor of Residential Schools, she has worked from the grass-roots to the national levels helping Indigenous peoples overcome the damage done to language and culture by colonization. In doing so, she has developed Indigenous language undergraduate and graduate degree programs at the University of Victoria where she serves as the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Education. She was awarded the Order of Canada for her work.To learn more about the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, please visit our website thunderbirdpf.orgYou can find us on social media by searching for ThunderbirdPFOur theme music is by Courtney Riley, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation.Mino Bimaadiziwin is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions and the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.
38:50 07/08/2022
Food is Medicine -- with Chef Jenni Lessard
"I hope that people can integrate harvesting from the land into the healing process. Instead of just being in a building focusing on why you have an addiction, maybe you can get on the land and let some of these plant nations heal you too."We're thrilled to have Metis Chef Jenni Lessard on the podcast to discuss the nourishing power of Indigenous cooking and harvesting from the land. One of Canada's top chefs, Chef Jenni and Sherry have a fun and lively conversation about the healing powers of food, how to harvest responsibly from the land and delicious ways to serve up ingredients you can find around you. Having run and owned several restaurants, Chef Jenni Lessard now runs her own catering firm, Inspired By Nature. She is the Indigenous Culinary Consultant at Wanuskewin Heritage Park in Saskatoon, Secretary of the Indigenous Culinary of Associated Nations, and she lives in Saskatchewan’s Qu’Appelle Valley, Treaty Four Territory and homeland of the Metis.To learn more about the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, please visit our website thunderbirdpf.org You can find us on social media by searching for ThunderbirdPFOur theme music is by Courtney Riley, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation.Mino Bimaadiziwin is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions and the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.
48:47 06/09/2022
Harm Reduction Saves Lives with Trevor Stratton
"(Harm reduction) is not just giving people safer equipment to keep using drugs, it's also to develop relationships and develop that trust. And eventually some people choose to get off, not all. Sometimes the success of harm reduction is the quality of life of that person went up and they were connected to community."We're so happy to have harm reduction expert Trevor Stratton on the program, talking about the importance of harm reduction as a life saving and altering tool in the ongoing meth and opioid use crisis affecting Indigenous communities. Trevor is the Coordinator for the International Indigenous Working Group on HIV & AIDS at Communities, Alliances and Networks (caan.ca) is a 56-year old, two-spirit citizen of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation near Toronto. ***Warning, this episode features discussion around suicide which may be triggering for some listeners.For more on this topic, check out our episode with Dr Evan AdamsTo learn more about the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, please visit our website www.thunderbirdpf.org You can find us on social media by searching for ThunderbirdPFOur theme music is by Courtney Riley, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation.Mino Bimaadiziwin is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions and the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.
35:01 05/05/2022
Jonathan Peltier - An Opioid Survivor Story
"You have to be honest. Not a lot of people are going to respect your story. Not a lot of people are going to like your story. But what they are going to respect is your truth and your honesty. So if anything, just be honest and make sure your truth is your strength and not your dysfunction."Jonathan Peltier is an opioid survivor who now works in helping people come through drug and alcohol addiction as a reintegration worker in the Wikwemikong Justice Program, in the Wikwemikong Unceded Territory on Manitoulin Island, in northern Ontario. Jonathan spent decades addicted to opioids. It had crippling effects on his own health, his life and his family. In this moving and thoughtful interview, Jonathan takes us through his descent into addiction, the impact that had, and his own journey to recovery, the importance of First Nations traditions and ceremony in doing that, and helping others to follow his path.***Please note: Dr Alfred Nkut, who is mentioned in this interview, was found guilty in 2013 of defrauding the Ontario Health Insurance Plan of $800,000 and, in a separate trial, of sexual assault. He was facing a hearing over allegations of professional misconduct with the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons later that year, when he passed away.For more on the work of Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, please visit our website www.thunderbirdpf.orgYou can find us on social media by searching for ThunderbirdPFOur theme music is by Courtney Riley, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation.Mino Bimaadiziwin is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions and the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.
44:16 04/07/2022
Dr Evan Adams - Transforming Health Care
We’re really thrilled to have Dr Evan Adams as our guest on this podcast.He is the deputy chief medical officer at Indigenous Services Canada, where he has helped lead their on-going national COVID-19 response, while ensuring culturally safe and efficient service delivery.And for many of you, he is a familiar face and voice from his days as an actor, before he began practicing medicine, especially from his role in the hit 1998 hit film "Smoke Signals," playing a character with a very specific catchphrase! “Hey Victor!”Since then, Dr Adams has dedicated his life to health and health policy.Prior joining Indigenous Services Canada, he was Chief Medical Officer with the First Nations Health Authority in British Columbia, which has transformed Indigenous health care delivery in recent years.In this smart and fascinating conversation, Sherry Huff and Dr Adams discuss the success of the FNMHA, how that can be replicated across the country, his take on the impact of the opioid and meth crisis, the importance of harm reduction in tackling that crisis, why traditional medicine can sometimes play a more important role than its western counterpart, and his decision to run for the presidency of the Canadian Medical Association.Dr Adams is a Coast Salish physician and a proud member of the Tla'amin First Nation near Powell River, BC.For more on the work of Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, please visit our website www.thunderbirdpf.organd you can find us on social media by searching for ThunderbirdPFOur theme music is by Courtney Riley, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation.Mino Bimaadiziwin is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions and the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.
29:58 03/03/2022
Tackling the Opioid Crisis in Communities with Tim Ominika
"We are naturally outdoors people and getting that understanding and learning our history and our culture about all of the traditional medicine, the history of our land, our teachings, hunting, all of those areas that have been proven to be effective in mental health and addictions, this has been very impactful in our First Nations community."Our guest this episode is Tim Ominika, Deputy Chief of the Wiikwemkoong First Nation on Manitoulin Island, and the new Stakeholder Coordinator at the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.In this fascinating and engaging conversation, host Sherry Huff and Tim discuss his work at ground level, combatting opioid and methamphetamine use, including making sure his community had health care workers and doctors willing to embrace traditional healing methods and ceremony, the importance of using a community based approach instead of just focusing on the individual, the role of connecting with the land in overcoming addiction, and more.For more on the work of Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, please visit our website www.thunderbirdpf.organd you can find us on social media by searching for ThunderbirdPFOur theme music is by Courtney Riley, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation.Mino Bimaadiziwin is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions and the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.
38:33 02/03/2022
Systemic Racism in Health Care with Dr Alika Lafontaine
We're thrilled to have Dr Alika Lafontaine, the first Indigenous president of the Canadian Medical Association, as our guest on this episode of Mino Bimaadiziwin. In this frank and thoughtful conversation, host Sherry Huff and Dr Lafontaine talk about the barriers to health and wellness caused by systemic racism, what the death of First Nations woman Joyce Echaguan in a Quebec hospital revealed about the obstacles that exist to overcoming systemic racism and what changes need to happen at both the individual and institutional level. They also discuss the importance that traditional medicine and practices play in improving outcomes for First Nations patients, and how that can be better integrated into the mainstream health care system.As well as being President of the Canadian Medical Association, Dr. Lafontaine, is an anesthesiologist practicing in Grand Prairie, Alberta. He has won many awards over his career and previously served as President of the Indigenous Physicians Association. A proud member of the Métis Nation Alberta, he has Anishinaabe, Cree, Métis and Pacific Islander ancestry and was born and raised in Treaty 4 territory in southern Saskatchewan.For more on the work of Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, please visit our website www.thunderbirdpf.organd you can find us on social media by searching for ThunderbirdPFOur theme music is by Courtney Riley, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation.Mino Bimaadiziwin is produced by David McGuffin of Explore Podcast Productions and the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.
31:37 12/17/2021
Addressing the Worst Substance Use Crisis in Modern History
Welcome to the first episode of Mino Bimaadiziwin – a podcast by the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, thunderbirdpf.org Mino bimaadiziwin means living the good life in the language of the Anishinabe. We chose that as a name for our podcast because it captures what we all hope for. This podcast aims to seek and share insight about addictions and mental health issues that many of our families and communities are dealing with. We’re going to be fearless in exploring the tough issues with some of the leading voices in Indigenous wellness. Our aim is the same as Thunderbird’s – to work with communities to address substance use and addictions issues by taking a wholistic approach to healing and wellness; one that is grounded in culture, Indigenous ways of knowing, respect, community, and above all, kindness and compassion. This podcast is recorded at Eelūnaapèewi Lahkèewiit, the home of the Lenape, in Southwestern Ontario, where Thunderbird houses its head offices. On this episode, host Sherry Huff is joined by Thunderbird’s CEO Dr. Carol Hopkins to discuss the opioid and methamphetamine crisis that is raging through many Indigenous communities. It is described as the worst public health crisis in modern history. Carol and Sherry discuss the roots of the crisis, and tools communities can use to get out if it, including the role of Indigenous culture, and if declaring a state of emergency is the answer. Sherry Huff is a former reporter and producer at CBC Radio and a proud member of Eelūnaapèewi Lahkèewiit. Today, she works for Thunderbird, managing communications. Dr. Carol Hopkins is the chief executive officer of Thunderbird. Carol is also Lenape. She has spent more than twenty years working in the field of First Nations addictions and mental health, with a special focus on the use of traditional knowledge and healing. She holds both a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Toronto and a degree in sacred Indigenous Knowledge, equivalent to a PhD in western-based education systems. She is a First Nations Representative to the United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs, an Officer of the Order of Canada, and has recently been recognized with an honorary Doctor of Laws from Western University. She’s also someone many people turn to for information about Indigenous addictions and mental health issues. Theme music by Courtney Riley, Chippewas of the Thames First Nation. Produced by David McGuffin, Explore Podcast Productions.
40:45 10/19/2021