Show cover of Lawyers Weekly Podcast Network

Lawyers Weekly Podcast Network

The Lawyers Weekly Podcast Network explores the myriad issues, challenges, trends and opportunities facing legal professionals in Australia. Produced by Australia’s largest and most-trusted legal publication, Lawyers Weekly, the four shows on the channel – The Lawyers Weekly Show, The Corporate Counsel Show, The Boutique Lawyer Show and Protégé – all bring legal marketplace news to the audience via engaging and insightful conversations. Our editorial team talking to legal professionals and industry experts about their fascinating careers, ground-breaking case work, broader sociocultural quagmires, and much more. Visit www.lawyersweekly.com.au/podcasts for the full list of episodes.

Tracks

The Boutique Lawyer Show: How small firms can prepare for the right to disconnect
The passage of legislation allowing for a right to disconnect for Australian workers provides law firm owners across the country an opportunity to challenge the paradigms that they hold around flexible working and design a workplace that works for their employees and fosters productivity, argues one director. In this episode of The Boutique Lawyer Show, host Jerome Doraisamy welcomes back in house nous director and employment legal counsel Natasha Hannah to discuss what is meant by the term “right to disconnect”, whether and how professional services firms are responding to the passage of its legislation, the concerns that employers have, and hurdles to be overcome in the new environment. Hannah also details the contractual and policy changes that small-firm owners will have to undertake, the various conversations that should be had both with one’s staff members and a firm’s clients, how to navigate those conversations and textual changes, designing a workplace accordingly, striking the right balance with generational attitudes and business needs, undertaking such changes against the backdrop of other firm concerns, and seeing the new legislation as a business opportunity. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
24:04 4/23/24
Protégé: The 3 types of relationship you need to succeed
Having reflected on the relationships in her personal and professional life that have helped her feel “most secure, supported, and passionate”, Giovanna Bongiorno has advice for the next generation of lawyers on whom they need to invest time in so as to thrive. In this episode of The Protégé Podcast, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Curtin University commerce/law student and KPMG employment tax consultant Giovanna Bongiorno about the relationships that have been most meaningful and inspiring for her, how and why she learnt about the importance of a three-tiered relational network, and how those tiers intersect and complement each other. Bongiorno also discusses the extent to which the next generation of lawyers are cognisant of the need for these tiers and whether they invest time in them, whether virtual learning impedes one’s ability to develop networks, practical steps to develop and maintain networks, carving out time to invest in relationships, and how and why she is a better emerging professional for having a three-tiered relational network. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
24:56 4/22/24
Sports and entertainment law will keep getting ‘bigger and bigger’
The domestic and global appetite to consume sports and entertainment keeps growing. As such, legal work – in its myriad forms – will continue to expand alongside it, says a global firm partner. In this episode of The Lawyers Weekly Show, host Jerome Doraisamy welcomes back Squire Patton Boggs partner Tony Chong to discuss what’s happening in sports and entertainment law, the issues and challenges being faced on the ground by practitioners, the need for legal teams to continually anticipate evolutions in the sporting and entertainment realms, and staying on top of the social, cultural and even political zeitgeist in understanding how the environment will evolve. Chong also details the need to immerse one’s self in the industry, engaging with other practice groups, the potential need to be a jack-of-all-trades, taking a case-by-case approach, how legal work in these spaces will continue to grow, and why it is so exciting to be at the forefront of such change. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
16:54 4/19/24
The Boutique Lawyer Show: Navigating increases in youth offending
In an evolving sociocultural landscape, criminal lawyers must continually adapt their approaches to clients and service to the broader community. Recent rises in instances of offending by youths, for example, offer a chance for such practitioners to ensure best practice and step up their game. In this episode of The Boutique Lawyer Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Gallant Law senior in-house advocate Jonathan Brancato about how and why he became a criminal lawyer, his passion for advocacy, what’s happening on the ground for practitioners and the reported increase in offending by youths, and why practitioners are seeing such increases. Brancato also delves into how practitioners can respond to such changing circumstances, the need to adapt one’s approach to client management, approaches he has adopted that have worked and not worked, broader sociocultural challenges that criminal lawyers have to grapple with in the current age, opportunities for best practice that can be grasped, and the need to take a more holistic approach in servicing one’s broader community. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
21:08 4/17/24
The Corporate Counsel Show: Building better relationships with external providers
Much is made of what law firms can and must do to support their clients. But what of the client itself? Here, we explore the responsibility of law departments to create and maintain better relationships with their external providers. In this episode of The Corporate Counsel Show, host Jerome Doraisamy welcomes back Cognetic Legal & Consulting founder and principal Damien Sullivan to discuss why it is so important for law departments to ensure their clients want to remain on their legal services panels, the things law firms are looking out for from their clients at this juncture, and how and why law firms should be comfortable providing constructive criticism and feedback where necessary. Sullivan also reflects on how front of mind such concerns are for law departments right now and how high a priority it should be, some of the things that those departments are currently getting wrong, the need to strip things back to basics and get the fundamentals right, and other practical steps that in-house teams can and must employ, as well as how those legal teams can better balance internal pressure against how they treat their external providers. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
23:20 4/15/24
The Boutique Lawyer Show: Growing and managing your firm (and lessons from motorsports)
Sven Burchartz knew he wanted to be a lawyer in year 10. Since then, his vocational journey has taught him a lot about what it takes to succeed as a business leader – including how leaning into his passion for motorsports has aided his growth. In this episode of The Boutique Lawyer Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Kalus Kenny Intelex principal Sven Burchartz about how he realised he wanted to be a lawyer as a teenager, whether the principals of growing and managing boutique law firms have evolved in recent decades, being different and memorable as a business, adapting to what’s happening within one’s practice, and knowing the right questions to ask of one’s self. Burchartz also reflects on his passion for motorsports, how he is mindful that it’s the only time he is truly on his own, how he is better personally and professionally for having time behind the wheel, and what other lawyers can learn from race car driving. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
22:21 4/12/24
LawTech Talks: The impact of AI on legal workflows
In this episode of LawTech Talks, produced in partnership with LexisNexis, host Lauren Croft speaks with LexisNexis executive vice-president and chief technology officer Jeff Reihl, executive vice-president and chief product officer Jamie Buckley, and Asia-Pacific managing director Greg Dickason about all things generative artificial intelligence (AI) and its transformative impact on legal workplaces. The guests dive deep into the world of emerging tech and explore how generative AI is reshaping legal workflows, the competitive advantages it offers for lawyers, challenges and opportunities in the Australian legal market, and the importance of retrieval-augmented generation (RAG) for AI accuracy, as well as share vital advice for integrating AI into legal practice. Reihl, Buckley and Dickason also share their perspectives on the future of AI in the legal profession, potential areas of significant impact, and best practices for law firms navigating the evolving landscape of technology and AI. To learn more about LexisNexis and its work in this space, click here.
31:08 4/11/24
Protégé: Ensuring your skill set is fit for purpose
Given how much the professional services marketplace is set to change in years to come, emerging law graduates must ensure they are open-minded and adaptable to change so that their vocational capabilities are suitable for the evolving landscape. In this episode of The Protégé Podcast, host Jerome Doraisamy welcomes Law Wise Youth founder and creative director Chami Rupasinghe to discuss her motivation for undertaking a postgraduate law degree, her desire to undertake community service, leaning into her creative side, ensuring that self-care doesn’t get sidelined, and how and why her organisation, Law Wise Youth, came about. Rupasinghe also fleshes out the need for careers and vocational information to be more readily available to those coming through the ranks, her reflections on launching various projects and an e-commerce business in the current climate, having a diversified professional offering, what questions one must ask of one’s self in better crafting their vocational offering, the need to have business skills up one’s sleeve, the importance of personal branding, and her advice for others in ensuring their skill set is fit for purpose. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
28:02 4/9/24
The Boutique Lawyer Show: Building and harnessing international relationships
Here, an award-winning young lawyer reflects on how she has developed and grown her personal and professional networks and how this has allowed her firm to flourish. In this episode of The Boutique Lawyer Show, host Jerome Doraisamy welcomes back Crossover Law Group founder and principal Marial Lewis to discuss the importance of both personal and professional connections across jurisdictions, how soon boutique firm owners should be looking to develop such relationships following the inception of their practices, and what such firm owners can learn from her experience as a migration lawyer looking to bolster her network. Lewis also delves into the practical steps to start garnering such relationships, how to balance this priority against other urgent priorities for boutique firm owners, thinking differently as leaders of small legal practices in a post-pandemic climate, and why she is a better lawyer for having invested time in the development of her personal and professional relationships. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
24:04 4/9/24
The risks and costs of business travel post-pandemic
As businesses resume travel activities in the post-pandemic world, the landscape of corporate travel has significantly evolved. In this special episode, brought to you from Lawyers Weekly’s sister brand, HR Leader, Rodger Cook, general manager of global security services at World Travel Protection, delves into the intricacies of business travel. With costs soaring and risks constantly evolving, leaders must put their best foot forward to ensure their workforce remains safe and secure in business travel. Cook’s extensive travel experience has been pivotal in understanding the needs of businesses when they send employees abroad. He emphasises the importance of duty of care, ensuring companies are well informed about the risks associated with travel and how to mitigate them effectively. He also discusses the benefit of transferable skills, as his experience boasts diversity in professions. Such transferable skills are becoming increasingly crucial as companies face talent shortages. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
23:06 4/5/24
The Boutique Lawyer Show: Leveraging BigLaw expertise to create a winning boutique culture and strategy
Having come from national and global law firms, the leaders of award-winning boutique Hazelbrook Legal understand what it takes to succeed as a BigLaw business and as practitioners, and they are leveraging those lessons to build a strategic approach that befits a smaller firm environment. In this episode of The Boutique Lawyer Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Hazelbrook Legal managing partner Hugh Griffin and partner Lucy Adamson about their respective experiences in national and global law firms and what they learnt from such roles, how they are looking to bring their experiences from those bigger practices to the boutique environment, and how best to “get the best of both worlds” in having a personalised workplace culture while working on matters traditionally seen as the remit of bigger players. The pair also flesh out how to stay true to a firm’s values, how well the firm has performed since its inception 10 years ago, what works and doesn’t work in crafting a winning culture, the frequency of check-ins on whether the strategy is working, and what motivates them to ensure that their boutique practice can continue to win big work while maintaining its unique cultural approach. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
25:54 4/3/24
Protégé: Law is for everyone
As a lawyer and veterinary nurse, Michelle Neil is dedicated to serving the community around her. Having experienced significant hardship in her early life but then finding the right support systems, hearing others’ stories, and ultimately being able to share her own helped her realise that the legal profession is open to anyone who wants to help others. (Content warning: This episode contains content that may be disturbing or distressing to some listeners. Discretion is advised.) In this episode of The Protégé Podcast, host Jerome Doraisamy is joined by Vitality Law lawyer Michelle Neil to discuss what she calls her “unorthodox” personal journey, the impact that her upbringing had on her, what “high-controlling” environments are like, learning how to break free, and how she eventually managed to carve out her own path and enter the legal profession in her 30s. Neil also reflects on her work as a freelance veterinary nurse and why such work is so meaningful to her, why law became a worthwhile vocational path for her to pursue, lessons learnt from rebuilding one’s life, opportunities for next-generation lawyers to flourish, how her experiences inform her approach to lawyering and client service delivery, and ultimately why – no matter one’s background – there is a place for anyone in this profession. Help is available via Lifeline on 13 11 14 and Beyond Blue at 1300 22 4636. Each law society and bar association also has resources available on their respective websites. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
24:43 4/2/24
Balancing life as a farmer and BigLaw senior associate
Caitlin McConnel has had a vocational journey unlike any other, having served as a Federal Court judge’s associate and now working at Clayton Utz while also being a sixth-generation farmer and working on her family’s property in regional Queensland. Her two vocations give her a unique perspective on law, national needs, and what’s needed moving forward. In this episode of The Lawyers Weekly Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Clayton Utz senior associate Caitlin McConnel about her journey in law to date, how she became involved in her family’s farming work and business, how she balances farm work with legal work, and what lawyers can learn from farmers. McConnel also delves into the myriad agricultural issues and challenges she sees both on the land and in her work, what is needed to address such matters moving forward, her perception of ever-increasing climate litigation and work in the natural capital markets space, and serving the community both as a farmer and as a legal professional. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
33:43 3/27/24
A nightclub-owner-turned-lawyer on the value of non-linear career paths
Having spent years in the hospitality scene, including as an owner of a nightclub and bar, Jeremy Koadlow understands the importance of authenticity, appreciating where people are coming from, and how best to serve the community. In this episode of The Lawyers Weekly Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with MA Legal associate Jeremy Koadlow about his professional journey and work in hospitality venues, what such work taught him about managing and serving people, the perspective he gleaned that other lawyers can learn from, and how important and valuable non-traditional pathways can be for one’s journey. Koadlow also reflects on the need for authenticity in one’s interactions with clients, the place for resilience in one’s work, why it is OK (and indeed useful) to have experienced a non-linear pathway in law and in one’s career, and how best those coming through the ranks can gain more perspective on working life and bolster their offerings for clients. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
20:25 3/26/24
The Boutique Lawyer Show: Shoring up your firm’s cyber frameworks
For small law firms, it is not so much a question of if your practice will be impacted by a cyber incident but when. As such, firm owners must be prepared to respond so they can return to normal business operations as quickly as possible and with minimal disruption. In this episode of The Boutique Lawyer Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with McGrathNicol partner Brendan Payne about the biggest lessons learnt from cyber incidents and subsequent business responses in the last 12 months, the extent to which law firms are prepared (or not) to manage cyber incidents, and how well law firms are doing compared to other professional services counterparts in putting in place the right proactive measures to prevent attacks. Payne also explains the issues surrounding structured versus unstructured data that law firms will have to grapple with, the current hurdles facing law firm owners when it comes to effectively managing existing risks, questions that firm owners should be asking of themselves so they can take the right practical steps, and how much education should be undertaken versus using external providers. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
21:26 3/25/24
The Boutique Lawyer Show: Onboarding – an overlooked necessity for small firms?
In the competitive landscape of talent acquisition and retention, Australian businesses are increasingly recognising the importance of an effective onboarding process. Here, in this special episode brought to you by Lawyers Weekly’s sister brand, HR Leader, host Jack Campbell sits down with Lauren Karan, director at Karan & Co, to discuss just how crucial it is to get this step right. Karan emphasises that onboarding should commence the moment a candidate signs their contract. This period is delicate, as new hires are often counter-offered by their current employers and have yet to establish a relationship with their new manager. With the rise of remote and hybrid work models due to the pandemic, onboarding has faced new challenges. Maintaining communication is key. Whether through team chats or scheduled video calls, it’s vital to ensure new hires feel integrated and supported, even when working from a distance. However, the responsibility of onboarding should not be shouldered by HR alone. Managers play a pivotal role in the process. Karan argues that managers should take the initiative to connect with new hires, scheduling regular check-ins and being readily available to answer questions. This not only helps the new employee settle in but also demonstrates the manager’s commitment to their success. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
23:05 3/22/24
Protégé: Trial and error and crafting your career path
Very few students and new lawyers are crystal clear on what they want to do for the entirety of their careers. Putting one’s self out there and experimenting with different options not only helps one discover different vocational pathways but also gives one a better sense of self and purpose for a legal career. In this episode of The Protégé Podcast, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Jonah Farry (QUT law student, HopgoodGanim law clerk, and QUT Law, Innovation and Technology Society co-founder) about how and why he became interested in innovation as part of his education journey, the “gaping holes” he’s seeing for the next generation of legal professionals, why trial and error in finding one’s career path is so important, and whether students are cognisant of the need to get out and try new things. Farry also reflects on his own journey of trial and error and what he has learnt from those processes, the opportunities he has been exposed to and how he is better placed as an emerging practitioner, how easy or difficult it can be to put one’s self out there, challenges for emerging lawyers to overcome in seeking new and exciting opportunities, the questions those students and grads can be asking of themselves, and why such work can be so uplifting and rewarding. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
20:05 3/19/24
Ecological jurisprudence and the natural environment’s legal standing
In 2008, Ecuador enshrined the rights of nature in its constitution. But where is such jurisprudential thinking at in Australia? Here, property and commercial lawyer Mieke Elzer discusses the idea of nature’s rights at law, particularly in the wake of the successful Sharma appeal. In this episode of The Lawyers Weekly Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Attwood Marshall lawyer Mieke Elzer about the myriad forms of environmental law and how the earth law stream emerges from it, what is meant by ecological jurisprudence and where we’re at with such legal considerations, the notion that the natural environment – from trees to oceans – can or should have legal standing, and where Australia sits in relation to global counterparts on such questions. Elzer also delves into the likelihood or otherwise that the natural environment can or will be recognised in Australian law, increasing litigation being seen or to be seen in this space, what it would take for a test case to emerge on the legal standing of the natural environment, bringing the judiciary along for the journey in shifting mindsets, and how all legal practitioners can be more environmentally conscious in their daily operations – both for the community and for themselves.
26:00 3/18/24
The 10-year strategy, corporate compliance, and other immigration law matters
According to Maria Jockel, immigration law is a “complex, highly regulated area of law, which is totally and utterly underappreciated” regarding its significance for nation-building in Australia. In the face of the government’s recent moves in this space, work for immigration lawyers will continue to be complex but also stimulating, she says. In this episode of The Lawyers Weekly Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with BDO global and national immigration law leader Maria Jockel about her personal story of growing up in displaced persons camps, how and why she came to work in immigration law, the importance of “nation-building”, what the federal government’s 10-year strategy for immigration law looks like, and what it means for lawyers in this space. Jockel also details the state of affairs for corporate compliance with immigration matters and what practitioners need to know, practical steps to be taken with regard to being across the myriad of legislation, policy and flagged changes, the need to be “brave-hearted”, and what excites her about the future experience of immigration lawyers in Australia. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
24:52 3/14/24
The Corporate Counsel Show: 3 Tabcorp GCs on keeping a ‘laser focus’ on strategic priorities
When working in a large law department in a big Australian company, ensuring that the legal team’s work remains aligned with business objectives requires optimal collaboration and communication. Here, three general counsel from Tabcorp reflect on their work and how they work together to achieve such ends. In this episode of The Corporate Counsel Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Tabcorp group general counsel Ivana Kovacevic, general counsel of technology procurement, data, and privacy Fiona Tyas, and general counsel of M&A, treasury, and corporate services Tom Boyd to discuss the foremost challenges being faced by large law departments as 2024 gets into full swing, the road maker’s dilemma, data analysis and other required legal transformation projects. The conversation also fleshes out prioritising cyber concerns, how market factors can influence a company’s movements and performance, identifying and working towards strategic priorities, best practice approaches for achieving such priorities, aligning business and legal strategies, bringing the broader law department along for the ride, effective leadership of emerging counsel in the new normal, and lessons learnt since the start of the year when it comes to keeping a “laser focus” on the end goal. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
26:07 3/12/24
How lawyers can be more active during work hours
The adverse consequences on one’s holistic health from being overly sedentary are well established. In the modern working world, where lawyers are tethered to devices and the separation between home and work is blurred, being physically active is more essential than ever before. In this episode of The Lawyers Weekly Show, host Jerome Doraisamy is joined by TEDx speaker, personal trainer, fitness presenter and author Lizzie Williamson about how a lack of physical activity during the day can have deleterious consequences for professional services workers, how social media can exacerbate how one is feeling, and why it can be so difficult for lawyers to get up and move during the working day. Williamson also delves into the flow-on consequences for lawyers who are overly sedentary, overcoming a lack of motivation, the impact of negative motivation on one’s psyche, the roadblocks in the way of good practices, tips to get started on a more active journey, how leaders can encourage small steps for their teams, overcoming perfectionism, and realising what kind of day lawyers want to have. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
25:57 3/12/24
Women in Finance: Building a brand that lasts
There are so many amazingly successful women in the finance industry, but only a small number have a strong brand and online presence in this traditionally male-dominated industry.    As we celebrate International Women’s Day, we want to help more women raise their profile and showcase the incredible professionals in this space.   In this episode, partnered by Mortgage Choice (part of the REA Group), we’re picking the brain of its executive manager, corporate communications, events & franchise marketing, Sally Chadwick, to find out: How to build a brand presence.  The benefits of having a strong brand presence. Top tips to help you get started today. And much more!
26:21 3/8/24
Space law and the ‘golden’ opportunities for women professionals
Helen Tung – a barrister, space lawyer, and College of Law lecturer in international arbitration – is brimming with excitement about the myriad vocational pathways currently available in space law. For practitioners of all stripes (particularly women lawyers, for whom there are no barriers to entry), space law is a rich, stimulating and rewarding emerging field, she says. In this episode of The Lawyers Weekly Show, and in conjunction with International Women’s Day, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Ms Tung about how and why she got into space law, the issues, challenges and emerging trends she is seeing in this field, and how lawyers across the board can transition to work in this space, regardless of their expertise and backgrounds. Ms Tung also delves into why she is so passionate about seeing more women practitioners involved in space law and how the traditional barriers to entry aren’t as apparent in this field, how she informs next-generation lawyers about space law, and her predictions for how the emerging field of space law will evolve in years to come. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
26:37 3/7/24
The Corporate Counsel Show: How digitally mature are in-house teams under 10?
In this special episode of The Corporate Counsel Show, produced in partnership with Xakia, we explore newly released research detailing how legal teams with 10 or fewer staff manage digital solutions and how mature their use of technology is at this critical juncture. Host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Xakia founder and chief executive Jodie Baker about the need to examine how digitally mature small in-house legal teams are, given where the market is at, her key takeaways from the research conducted by Agile Market Intelligence, how staffing levels can influence a team’s level of digital maturity, as well as the impact of budgetary constraints. Ms Baker also delves into the varying relationships small teams have with technology solutions such as business tools, digital signature, matter management, contract management, reporting and analytics, spend management, and artificial intelligence, where small teams are digitally mature, where they are not, and the potential reasons that small teams might not be adopting some technology as fast as others. To learn more about Xakia, click here. To read Xakia’s white paper, titled Legal Tech for Teams Under 10, click here. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
26:49 3/7/24
Protégé: Thinking big
As next-generation professionals enter the workforce at a time of monumental technological and professional change, lawyers coming through the ranks not only have an opportunity to think outside the box and be more creative in crafting a vocational path – but they arguably have a duty to do so. In this episode of The Protégé Podcast, host Jerome Doraisamy is joined by Best Wilson Buckley Family Law graduate solicitor Natalia Hutchison to discuss how and why she became a family lawyer, what thinking big as an emerging practitioner means to her and why she thinks it is so important in the current climate for those coming through the ranks to embody, and how innovation feeds into such an attitude. Ms Hutchison also reflects on her journey of travelling multiple hours per day from rural Queensland to get to work, how her perception of the profession has shifted over time, the issues and challenges standing in the way of new lawyers being able to think big, lessons she has learnt, practical ways to think outside the box, the need to be adaptable and flexible, overcoming reluctance or scepticism about one’s capacity to think big, catering to one’s wellness needs, and what excites her about the opportunities in front of next-generation lawyers. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
20:02 3/5/24
CPD tips ahead of the deadline
In this special episode of The Lawyers Weekly Show, produced in partnership with Legalwise Seminars, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Legalwise Seminars managing director Jacquelyn Simon about what lawyers need to know about continuing professional development (CPD) and offers tips for them ahead of the looming deadline. The pair discuss how the accumulation of one’s CPD points is something that sneaks up on practitioners each year, the need for lawyers to get the balance right in getting their points and navigating a turbulent market, the CPD rules that are commonly misunderstood in Australia, whether it is possible to accrue all points online or if in-person learning is needed, the core areas of CPD to be complied with, whether one can defer extra hours accrued to subsequent years, what lawyers want from their CPD at this point in time, and how Legalwise is looking to support practitioners of all stripes in the current climate. To learn more about Legalwise Seminars, click here. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
20:04 3/4/24
What makes a good banking and finance lawyer?
Here, reigning Banking and Finance Partner of the Year Stuart Cormack offers insights into what day-to-day operations look like for practitioners in this space, what he finds meaningful and stimulating about such work, and how best those coming through the ranks can succeed in B&F. In this episode of The Lawyers Weekly Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Gilbert + Tobin partner Stuart Cormack about his journey in law and how and why he became a banking and finance lawyer, the expertise one needs to become a practitioner in this space, the crossover with other firm practice areas, the current trends he is seeing in the market, and why he finds such work so meaningful. Mr Cormack also details international opportunities that lawyers in this space can explore, what constitutes best practice for B&F lawyers in the face of market challenges and how best to engage with clients, the key traits that make a successful B&F lawyer, opportunities for those looking to exit private practice, and his advice to this coming through the ranks. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
24:51 3/1/24
The Corporate Counsel Show: Crafting your investor and media relations strategy following a data breach
In this episode of The Corporate Counsel Show, brought to you from Lawyers Weekly’s sister brand, Cyber Daily, journalists Liam Garman, David Hollingworth, and Daniel Croft provide critical insights for business leaders on how to craft an investor and media relations strategy in the event of a breach. The trio discuss the latest news before diving into how cyber breaches require all hands on deck to get a company back to business as usual, provide anonymised case studies of investor and media relations strategies that have allowed companies to take control of the narrative, and detail top tips for businesses to get on the front foot in the event of a breach. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
25:23 2/28/24
The Boutique Lawyer Show: Building a personal board of directors
As a new boutique firm owner, Stefani Janson appreciates being able to define her vocational legacy while enjoying the rollercoaster of being a business owner. Part of her early success is down to having found and nurtured a tribe that is helping her flourish. In this episode of The Boutique Lawyer Show, host Jerome Doraisamy speaks with Hestia Law principal Stefani Janson about her personal and professional motivations, her initial reflections on being a firm owner and its challenges, how prepared one can be to launch a new legal practice, her self-awareness and how that has aided her development with the new firm. Ms Janson also details her views on the need for a personal board of directors and where this idea came from for her, the importance of finding one’s tribe in law and leaning into that, the questions one needs to ask in building such a network and how diverse it can or should be, examining that board’s utility and need for refreshing (if applicable), how high a priority having such a board should be for small-firm owners, and why she is a better lawyer and person for having such support in her professional life. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
30:16 2/27/24
The sustainability of justice in our local courts
NSW Chief Justice Andrew Bell recently said that judges and magistrates need further support, or the Australian court system will risk judicial crisis. For these two senior criminal law practitioners, the comments ring true, with processes in the state’s courts needing to be urgently bolstered for the sake of practitioners, clients, and the community alike In this episode of The Lawyers Weekly Show, host Jerome Doraisamy is joined by Taylor Rose consulting principals Angela Cooney and Trudie Cameron (national practice director and practice director at Armstrong Legal, respectively) to discuss what’s happening on the ground in state courts and the “crazy workloads” being dealt with, how and why the situation has become so unmanageable, the exhaustion being felt by advocates, and whether the advent of virtual hearings has helped or hindered in addressing such backlogs. The trio also reflect on the impact of such issues on practitioners, those on the bench, clients and the broader community, what solutions are urgently needed and from whom, reactive strategies that can be implemented by individuals, basic courtesies that lawyers can extend during matters to make things go more smoothly, and how best advocates can be looking after themselves during such difficult times. If you like this episode, show your support by rating us or leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (The Lawyers Weekly Show) and by following Lawyers Weekly on social media: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. If you have any questions about what you heard today, any topics of interest you have in mind, or if you'd like to lend your voice to the show, email editor@lawyersweekly.com.au for more insights!
26:10 2/23/24

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