Show cover of Northwest Nature Matters

Northwest Nature Matters

What does applied conservation look like? Who does it affect? This podcast lets you hear directly from wildlife and habitat experts, through long-form conservation about natural history and conservation to better understand the range of conservation projects across the Pacific Northwest - from multi-state species studies to the restoration of a riverbank. Listen and explore the conservation stories of longevity, wild ideas, and influential people that shape and sustain our natural world. Host Monty Gregg Monty Gregg is the Forest Wildlife Biologist for the Ochoco National Forest and Crooked River National Grassland. He manages the wildlife program for the Forest and Grassland and supports district wildlife biologists’ efforts to maintain and restore habitat function for the variety of species endemic to that habitat. Monty has a B.S. in Wildlife Sciences from Oregon State University, and through much of his career he has conducted habitat restoration efforts for locally and regionally important species from mule deer and elk, to federally listed species such as the northern spotted owl. Monty works at both regional and national levels to develop partnership opportunities for the Forest Service with various wildlife conservation organizations. This podcast is produced by the Oregon Wildlife Foundation.

Tracks

Evaluating Sea Otter Reintroduction in Oregon: The Kelp Ecosystem in the PNW Part 10
Dominique Kone joins us to discuss his M.S. research and recent publication last February informing a prospective sea otter reintroduction in Oregon. He addresses habitat suitability in Oregon, population growth scenarios, and more. His research is a key piece of information suggesting that a sea otter reintroduction is feasible in Oregon, but decision-makers needs to carefully evaluate various human interactions.  Dominique Kone's recent paper: https://www.elakhaalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Kone-et-al-2021.pdf
41:04 04/26/2021
#36 Ancient Evidence Protecting Living Heritage: The Kelp Ecosystem of the PNW Part 9
Professor and Curator Dr. Madonna Moss is an anthropological archaeologist who studies the long term history of Native Americans and First Nations of the Northwest Coast of North America, with a special focus on Tlingit and Haida and their ancestors. Join us for a fascinating discussion about how zooarcheology can help defend indigenous cultural practices in the modern world. Dr. Moss's book Northwest Coast: Archaeology as Deep History Dr. Moss's recent publication about sea otters: https://cpb-us-e1.wpmucdn.com/blogs.uoregon.edu/dist/e/397/files/2020/04/Moss-2020-sea-otters.pdf
76:57 07/08/2020
#35 Interconnected: First People from the Kelp Highway (The Kelp Ecosystem in the PNW Part 8)
In this episode three leaders from Oregon coast tribes provide heartfelt reflections, as they frame the loss of sea otters and the vision of its return with the history of their own people’s struggles, and how sea otters represent their own interconnectedness to the natural world. Don Ivy Chief of the Coquille Indian tribe; Robert Kentta the Siletz Tribal Cultural Resources Director; and Peter Hatch with the Siletz tribal Cultural Resources Program.  
84:29 06/08/2020
#34 Ancient Evidence: Sea Otters & First Peoples on the Oregon Coast (Kelp Ecosystem in the PNW Part 7)
Dr. Roberta Hall is an anthropologist and Professor Emeritus at Oregon State University. Roberta conducted numerous excavations of shell midden sites on the Oregon coast where she document use of various wildlife including sea otters, and other marine resources by ancient First Peoples. Roberta holds expertise in zoo-archaeology, medical anthropology, skeletal biology and more!   
49:03 05/12/2020
#33 Sea Otters Up-Close: The Kelp Ecosystem in the PNW Part 6
Marine Biologist and Researcher Dr. Shawn Larson from the Seattle Aquarium discusses sea otters up-close! Shawn explores sea otter diet, physiology, reproduction, and genetics - and how her research informs conservation.  Video of Shawn presenting her genetics research at the 2018 Oregon Sea Otter Status of Knowledge Symposium https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6vaSSrQNvU   photo courtesy Vancouver Aquarium 
47:00 05/04/2020
#32 A Deep Dive on Sea Otters: The Kelp Ecosystem in the PNW Part 5
A great conversation with leading sea otter researcher Dr. Tim Tinker. Tim discusses new science and reveals the varied issues effecting sea otter populations across their pacific range  - from Alaska to California - including his perspectives on a possible Oregon reintroduction.  Produced in Partnership with the Elakha Alliance
75:24 04/27/2020
#31 From Science to Solutions: The Kelp Ecosystem in the PNW Part 4
Tom Calvanese is a rockfish scientist, the Station Manager of the Port Orford Field Station, and a catalyst behind developing action to address kelp declines along Oregon's south coast. Join us for a multi-dimensional conversation about kelp conservation.  Produced in partnership with the Elakha Alliance A great resource from the NOYO Center for Marine Science abut kelp conservation: https://noyocenter.org/help-the-kelp/
73:31 04/20/2020
#30 Jim Estes: A Narrative of Discovery (The Kelp Ecosystem Part 3)
Renowned ecologist Jim Estes shares his story of discovery - from a young graduate student on the Aleutian Islands to scientific breakthroughs revealing the profound ecological effects of a keystone predator Produced in partnership with the Elakha Alliance Jim's memoir: https://www.amazon.com/Serendipity-Ecologists-Understand-Organisms-Environments/dp/0520285034/ref=sr_1_11?dchild=1&qid=1586768471&refinements=p_27%3AJames+Estes&s=books&sr=1-11 Trophic Cascades book coauthored by Jim: https://www.amazon.com/Trophic-Cascades-Predators-Changing-Dynamics/dp/1597264873/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&qid=1586768471&refinements=p_27%3AJames+Estes&s=books&sr=1-3
88:01 04/13/2020
#29 Understanding Urchins: The Kelp Ecosystem of the PNW - Part 2
Marine biologist Scott Groth is undertaking one of the longest monitoring projects on Oregon's nearshore. While red sea urchin numbers appear normal, purple sea urchin populations have exploded in recent years with alarming impacts to kelp forests.  Produced in partnership with the Elakha Alliance   Articles about Scott's work: https://newportnewstimes.com/article/sea-urchin-population-explodes https://oregonmarinereserves.com/2019/10/24/urchins/    
41:30 04/06/2020
#28 The Kelp Ecosystem of the PNW Part I
A fascinating window into new discoveries in kelp ecology and conservation with Sara Hamilton - a leading researcher studying trends in kelp forests. Sara is a PhD student at Oregon State University. Part one of a series produced in partnership with the Elakha Alliance Links to learn more: A story map compiled by the Samish tribe and others about the importance of kelp and it's loss in that region:  
73:07 03/30/2020
#27 Sentinels of the Big Sky: Exploring the Ecology of Western Grouse Species
Join me for a great conversation with Michael Schroeder, a research scientist with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Michael is a leading expert on the ecology and conservation of native grouse species of North America. Beyond technical expertise, Mike has a contagious passion for wildlife and being a wildlife biologist!   Mikes article "Grouse of the Lewis and Clark Expedition" in the Columbia Magazine: http://www.washingtonhistory.org/files/library/winter-2003-04_003.pdf  
76:35 01/01/2020
#26 Wildlife On The Move: Connectivity in a Human Altered Landscape
Wildlife connectivity is a hot topic - especially in the West. Join for a fascinating conversation with Leslie Bliss-Ketchum (Samara Group) and Rachel Wheat (ODFW). Leslie and Rachel are experts in wildlife connectivity, road ecology, and implementing new strategies to improve wildlife movement in a human altered landscape. Oregon Conservation Strategy Key Conservation Issue: Barriers to Animal Movement House Bill 2834 Secretarial Order 3362  
61:17 12/25/2019
#25 The Foundation: Exploring Plate Tectonics, Volcanism, and Mountain Building in the PNW
Geology is a fundamental discipline to major biological concepts such as evolution and biogeography. Join me in a fascinating conversation with Geologist Andrew J. Meigs as he explains the geologic principles behind plate tectonics, volcanism, and mountain-building in the Pacific Northwest. Andrew is a Professor of Geology at Oregon State University.  Support this Podcast via Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/northwestnaturematters Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries: https://www.oregongeology.org/ Statewide Landslide Database: https://www.oregongeology.org/slido/index.htm
79:28 11/21/2019
#24 Teaching the Next Generation of Conservationists
Great conversation with Selina Heppell, the Chair of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Selina discusses her research, describes her department's strategy for the future, and reflects on better ways to attract, train, inspire, and support the next generation of wildlife professionals.  OSU Dept of Fisheries and Wildlife  https://fw.oregonstate.edu/
61:11 11/07/2019
#23 Pathfinders in Wildlife
An inspiring discussion with three leaders in wildlife science and management. Harriet Allen, Evie Merrill, and Wini Kessler are recognized for their scientific accomplishments while leading wildlife programs in state and federal agencies and academia. In addition to their scientific credentials, they are pioneering trailblazers and mentors for women in the wildlife profession.   Harriet Allen: https://www.facebook.com/WashingtonFishWildlife/photos/were-celebrating-women-history-month-today-featuring-one-of-our-first-women-in-s/10152600067001761/ Wini Kessler: https://www.juneauempire.com/news/former-juneau-ecologist-becomes-second-woman-to-win-national-award/ Evie Merrill: https://wildlife.org/rmef-honors-tws-member-evelyn-merrill/
63:00 10/16/2019
#22 Changing Behavior: The Role of Zoos in Conservation
A fascinating discussion with Dr. David Shepherdson about the role of zoos in conservation. As the Deputy Director of Conservation at the Oregon Zoo, David discusses how zoos are becoming an essential foundation of conservation success; from the most significant voices in conservation education to leading experts in endangered species recovery programs.  Link to books by Gerald Durrell https://www.amazon.com/Gerald-Durrell/e/B001H6MXJW%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share Alexis De Tocqueville's essay on American civil engagement in "Democracy in America" 1831: https://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/805328.html Video by the Oregon Zoo's Leland Brown advancing hunter awareness about non-lead ammunition: https://vimeo.com/318080907
85:19 09/11/2019
#21 Equids At-Large on Public Land
Free-roaming horses and burros represent one of the most challenging and complex issues in the realm of western public land policy. In this episode we talk with Keith Norris, the Director of Policy and Communications with The Wildlife Society. Keith gives an overview of the issues and reveals important science based details and perspectives often left out of this otherwise emotionally driven topic.  For more information from TWS:https://wildlife.org/horse-rich-dirt-poor/ Short film co-produced by Keith https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6h242vy_q8 Positions statement of The Wildlife Society: https://wildlife.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/PS_FeralHorsesandBurros.pdf  Testimony of ORTWS: https://wildlife.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/WHB-Oregon-Comments2.pdf To support this podcast: https://www.patreon.com/northwestnaturematters ORTWS Annual Meeting https://ortws.org/2019-annual-meeting/ To Support Recovering America's Wildlife Act:       Thank your member of congress for supporting the Recovering America's Wildlife Act via social media (#RecoverWildlife), phone, or email.      If they are not yet supporting the bill, ask your Member of Congress to co-sponsor Recovering America’s Wildlife Act. You can also refer people to OurNatureUSA.com for an auto-generated letter.      Consider signing the National Wildlife Federation's 1000+ group letter of support      Consider joining the Alliance for America's Fish and Wildlife: https://www.fishwildlife.org/application/files/2215/1382/3049/AAFW_Membership_Sign-up.pdf      Please share this info with your colleagues, family and friends. #RecoverWildlife
85:30 08/28/2019
#20 Siskadee: The Natural History and Conservation of the Greater Sage Grouse
A great conversation with Christian Hagen and Jeremy Maestas about the natural history and conservation of the greater sage-grouse. Christian is a leading grouse scientist and research professor at OSU. Jeremy is a sagebrush ecologist at the NRCS and part of the Sage Grouse Initiative team implementing grouse conservation projects on private lands throughout the West.  Siskadee is the Crow name for Sage Grouse. photo by Steve Chindgren To support this podcast please visit our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/northwestnaturematters For more information about the Sage Grouse Initiative: https://www.sagegrouseinitiative.com/ Video: Wilson Wewa discusses the tribal perspectives on the meaning and significance of the sage grouse: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADW6IREJnGY Video: Excerpt from a sage grouse film produced by Steve Chindgren showing a huge winter flock in Wyoming https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaVQE_HmeXI  
78:39 08/19/2019
#19 When Mammals Fly: Exploring the Natural History and Conservation of Bats
In this episode we join leading bat experts Dr. Tom Rodhouse and Roger Rodriguez to discuss the natural history and conservation of bats.  Tom and Roger reveal fascinating facts about bat biology while also discussing their research, and new impacts to bat populations in the Pacific Northwest and beyond.  To learn more about the Northwest Bat Hub: https://osucascades.edu/HERS/northwestern-bat-hub To learn more about the North American Bat Monitoring Program: https://www.nabatmonitoring.org/#/home/welcome To learn more about the disease, White-nose Syndrome: https://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/  To learn more about the issue of bats and wind energy: http://batsandwind.org/   To support this podcast click here: https://www.patreon.com/northwestnaturematters  
75:16 07/30/2019
#18 Elakha: The Restoration of Sea Otters in Oregon
In this episode we discuss sea otter population restoration with Robert Bailey, the Board President of the Elakha Alliance. "Elakha" is the Chinook and Clatsop Indian word for sea otter. In the late 1990s, the Elakha Alliance was organized by members of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Coquille Indian Tribe and others to promote the restoration of sea otters and a healthy marine ecosystem on the Oregon coast. For more information click here To support this podcast series follow this link
62:20 07/17/2019
#17 Leaving a Legacy
A discussion with Monty Gregg, a wildlife biologist with the USFS, about implementing conservation projects using the power of partnerships. Proactive conservation on our public lands is a critical,yet challenging goal in an era of declining funds and little public support. Monty discusses his approach to partnerships - demonstrating how non-governmental organizations can become key players in success.   To support this podcast:  https://www.patreon.com/northwestnaturematters Restoration project example: http://ochocoforest.org/forest-management/aspen-restoration-central-oregon/
87:00 07/04/2019
#16 Narrative of a Naturalist: The Journal of John Kirk Townsend Pt 3 of 3
Part three of a three part series dedicated to the naturalist and explorer, John Kirk Townsend. In 1839, Townsend published his journal as a book entitled "A Narrative of a Journey Across the Rocky Mountains to the Columbia River". The journal recounts the then 24 year old's trip from Missouri to the mouth of the Columbia River in 1834, with fellow naturalist and professor Thomas Nuttall.  This narration is slightly abridged by the narrator and is based on an old printing where some excerpts of the original journal were omitted. For a complete version of Townsend's book, go to this link: http://osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/narrative-of-journey-across-rocky-mountains-to-columbia-river For free e-book versions go to www.gutenberg.org here: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/45238 W. Lindquist's paper :Stealing from the Dead:Scientists, Settlers, and Indian Burial Sites in Early-Nineteenth-Century Oregon  link: https://www.ohs.org/research-and-library/oregon-historical-quarterly/upload/04_Lindquist_Stealing-from-the-Dead_OHQ-115_revised.pdf An ethnohistorical review relating to Fort Vancouver https://www.nps.gov/fova/learn/historyculture/upload/Ethnohistorical-Overview-by-Deur-Accessible-PDF.pdf To learn more about early 19th century Phrenologists, their role in racist policies, and Samuel Morton's  Crania Americana: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMVzPCOut1w  
100:16 06/20/2019
#15 Narrative of a Naturalist: The Journal of John Kirk Townsend Pt 2
Part two of a series dedicated to the naturalist and explorer, John Kirk Townsend. In 1839, Townsend published his journal as a book entitled "A Narrative of a Journey Across the Rocky Mountains to the Columbia River". The journal recounts the then 24 year old's trip from Missouri to the mouth of the Columbia River in 1834, with fellow naturalist and professor Thomas Nuttall.  This narration is slightly abridged by the narrator and is based on an old printing where some excerpts of the original journal were omitted. For a complete version of Townsend's book, go to this link: http://osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/narrative-of-journey-across-rocky-mountains-to-columbia-river For free e-book versions go to www.gutenberg.org here: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/45238  
108:16 06/05/2019
#14 Narrative of a Naturalist: The Journal of John Kirk Townsend PT 1
Part one of a series dedicated to the naturalist and explorer, John Kirk Townsend. In 1839, Townsend published his journal as a book entitled "A Narrative of a Journey Across the Rocky Mountains to the Columbia River". The journal recounts the then 24 year old's trip from Missouri to the mouth of the Columbia River in 1834, with fellow naturalist and professor Thomas Nuttall. These naturalists brought with them, some preconceptions about Native Americans. Nevertheless, the Journal illustrates, in vivid detail, the travels of an expert naturalist/scientist exploring the West. This narration is slightly abridged by the narrator and is based on an old printing where some excerpts of the original journal were omitted. For a complete version of Townsend's book, go to this link: http://osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/narrative-of-journey-across-rocky-mountains-to-columbia-river For free e-book versions go to www.gutenberg.org here: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/45238  
123:36 05/22/2019
#13. Talking Wildlife Career Tracks
This episode is primarily oriented to students, early professionals, and others considering wildlife careers. We explore the various career tracks in the wildlife profession with Quentin Hays, a wildlife biologist and professor who brings personal perspectives from his diverse work in agency, academic, and private sectors.  Instead of delving into specific jobs, we explore how wildlife career tracks differ in the academic, non-profit, agency, and consulting/private sectors. We discuss pros and cons in each sector, and ways to prepare for each.  To Support Northwest Nature Matter's please visit our Patreon Site here: https://www.patreon.com/northwestnaturematters        
125:23 05/10/2019
#12 Innovating Success: Exploring New Strategies In Endangered Species Recovery
A fascinating conversation with wildlife biologist Paul Henson about Endangered Species Act implementation. Paul is the State Director for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Oregon Office where, among other duties, he supervises a team of dedicated biologists who implement ESA recovery strategies across a spectrum of listed species.  Paul discusses a new paradigm in ESA implementation that emphasized proactive conservation strategies for species like the Oregon Chub, California Condor and more. Enjoy!   A link to a recent paper about ESA implementation co-authored by Paul:  https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328277152_Improving_Implementation_of_the_Endangered_Species_Act_Finding_Common_Ground_Through_Common_Sense To Support Northwest Nature Matter's please visit our Patreon Site here: https://www.patreon.com/northwestnaturematters  
80:50 04/26/2019
#11 Our Conservation Legacy: Exploring a New Legislative Solution That Needs Your Support
Few issues are more important than the over-arching capacity to fund conservation now and into the future. In this episode we explore a key piece of funding legislation recently introduced to the Oregon State legislature, HB 2829, The Oregon Conservation and Recreation Fund. It's successful passage requires immediate support from Oregonians. We explore the bill and surrounding issue with Representative Ken Helm, policy experts Mark Labhart and Jim Owens, and former ODFW biologist Claire Puchy. We discuss the important history leading up to this far-reaching issue, what the bill does, and how you can support its passage in the coming DAYS and WEEKS.   For more information on this bill and email contacts of state Senators and Representatives: https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1/Measures/Overview/HB2829 Direct link to the Bill:  https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2019R1/Downloads/MeasureDocument/HB2829 Recovering America's Wildlife Act:  https://wildlife.org/policy/recovering-americas-wildlife-act/ Oregon Conservation Strategy: http://www.oregonconservationstrategy.org/
87:58 04/03/2019
#10 Trailblazing Recovery: A Case Study of the First Fish De-Listing Ever
A conversation with biologists Brian Bangs and Chris Allen about a pioneering success story recovering the once Endangered Oregon Chub. The Oregon Chub was de-listed in 2015 - the first fish ever removed from the federal Endangered Species Act list.  Brian is a native fish biologist and Oregon Chub project lead for ODFW. Chris Allen is an endangered species biologist and recovery project leader with the USFWS in Oregon.  Brian and Chris discuss various native freshwater fish species of conservation concern, the Oregon Chub project, and their trailblazing efforts to achieve de-listing. For more information about the Oregon Chub: USFWS website for Oregon Chub: https://www.fws.gov/oregonfwo/articles.cfm?id=149489414 ODFW website for Oregon Chub: https://www.dfw.state.or.us/fish/species/chub.asp If you are interested in Oregon Chub conservation on your land Contact info: Brian Bangs, ODFW biologist: brian.bangs@oregonstate.edu, 541-757-5080   photos courtesy of Freshwaters Illustrated
90:24 03/15/2019
#9 Simple Chemistry and a Complex Problem: Ocean Acidification in the Pacific Northwest
An eye-opening conversation with Dr. Burke Hales and Dr. George Waldbusser about the effects of ocean acidification on ocean ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest. Professors and research partners at Oregon State University, Burke and George definitively linked an increase in ocean acidification to the collapse of oyster seed production at a commercial oyster hatchery in Oregon. We discussed the overarching science behind climate change, the chemistry behind atmospheric and ocean carbon and acidity, effects on marine organisms and their ecosystems, and more! Links for listeners to explore this issue: Global Carbon Project website: https://www.globalcarbonproject.org/ NOAA Ocean Acidification Program: https://oceanacidification.noaa.gov/ Link to some of George and Burke's papers: http://oregonstate.academia.edu/GeorgeWaldbusser  
69:39 02/27/2019
#8 Get the Lead Out: Reducing Lead Exposure in Scavenging Birds of Prey
Leland Brown with the Oregon Zoo, and Jim Akenson with the Oregon Hunter's Association discuss lead exposure in scavenging birds of prey, and how to increase hunter adoption of non-lead ammunition.  Leland is a hunter, wildlife biologist, and the Non-lead Hunting Education Coordinator at the Oregon Zoo. Leland is a national leader in building outreach and education programs designed to increase hunter awareness of lead poisoning in wildlife and non-lead ammunition alternatives. Jim Akenson is a hunter, wildlife biologist, and the Conservation Director for the Oregon Hunter's Association. Jim has a broad background in wildlife research and project management, including long-term carnivore research in the Frank Church Wilderness.  Oregon Zoo's Non-lead page https://www.oregonzoo.org/conserve/non-lead-hunting-education-program North American Non Lead Partnership https://www.facebook.com/North-American-Non-lead-Partnership-2254811284786107/ Video: Presentation of an Oregon field science project investigating lead exposure in scavenging Raptors https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-ZeM2fdI2c Hunting with Non Lead http://www.huntingwithnonlead.org/ Peregrine Fund's Non-lead page https://www.peregrinefund.org/non-lead-ammo  
114:37 02/13/2019