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Bad Wolves

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After decades of thrashing away on the US underground rock scene, drummer John Boecklin brought together a gang of seasoned, metal warriors to work on new material in 2017 and by the following year Bad Wolves were enjoying a worldwide hit with a full-throated, emotional cover version of The Cranberries' song 'Zombie'.

First to join the project was front man Tommy Vext who had grown up in the New York hardcore scene in the 1990s and started appearing live and getting tattoos when he was only 13, before going on to front a variety of bands including Snot, Divine Heresy and Westfield Massacre. He'd given up drugs and alcohol, battled depression and even had to testify against his twin brother for trying to murder him, but had made it out to Los Angeles as a motivational speaker and mentor to others in the 12-step-programme, and was re-invigorated when he heard Boecklin's new songs. Alongside guitarists Doc Coyle (formerly of God Forbid), Chris Cain (Bury Your Dead) and bassist Kyle Konkiel (In This Moment), they set about turning metal thunder and punk chaos into an epic soul-bearing, sonic-shifting new sound after being inspired by seeing the Faith No More reunion tour.

Early singles 'Learn to Live' and 'Toast to the Ghost' won over metal and hard rock loyalists and landed them a deal with the Eleven Seven label, but after hearing 'Zombie' whilst hanging out in Venice Beach coffee shops, Vext suggested the band cover the 1990s classic, which was originally written about IRA bombings and the troubles in Northern Ireland. They were set to record a version of the song with its writer Dolores O'Riordan on backing vocals but on the day they were due in the studio The Cranberries singer passed away. The track became a tribute to O'Riordan with proceeds going to her children, and quickly became the most downloaded song in 40 countries, notching up over 55 million YouTube views in two months. Their debut album 'Disobey' followed and, amid songs about America's political divisions, police brutality and social injustice, they concocted a sound full of speaker-blowing ferocity and earnest intensity that drew comparisons with Rage Against the Machine, Pantera and Meshuggah.

Artist biography compiled by BDS/West 10. All rights reserved