Artist picture of DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince

DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince

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Artist's Top Tracks

Summertime DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince 04:29
The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince 02:55
Summertime DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince 03:57
Summertime DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince 03:57
A Nightmare on My Street DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince 04:58
Here We Go Again DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince 04:01
Brand New Funk DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince 04:01
The Magnificent Jazzy Jeff DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince 04:07
Parents Just Don't Understand DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince 05:14
A Touch of Jazz DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince 03:18

Most popular release

Girls Ain't Nothing But Trouble
Men In Black
Summertime
Parents Just Don't Understand

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For every mood

Biography

DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh
Prince became one of the first rap acts to achieve mass crossover appeal thanks
to their comedic story songs and inventive beats. Philadelphia natives Jeff (born
Jeff Towns) and Fresh Prince (born Will Smith) met as teenagers at a house
party in 1985 where Towns was DJing. He was already an accomplished local DJ,
and the younger Smith’s vocal style complemented his sonic approach. The duo
began working together and released their first single, “Girls Ain’t Nothing But Troubles” in 1986. Their album, Rock the House, came out that
year, but got wider exposure after they signed to Jive Records and that company
rereleased the album. They become cultural superstars with 1988’s He’s the
DJ, I’m the Rapper
thanks to the single “Parents Just Don’t Understand”,
a humorous, playful take on the cluelessness of the older generation. The video
became an MTV staple, winning Best Rap Video at the 1989 VMAs, and the song won
the first Grammy ever awarded for Best Rap Performance. 1989’s And in This
Corner…”
included the minor hit, “I Think I Can Beat Mike Tyson”,
and the next year the dup would perform the theme song for Smith’s television series
The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. They matured their sound for 1991’s Homebase
and were rewarded with the biggest chart hit of their career when the single “Summertime”
topped the R&B chart and climbed to number 4 on the pop chart. They went
for a harder vibe on 1993’s Code Red, leaving behind the goofy feel of
their early work. They separated soon after and Will Smith became one of the
biggest movie starts in the world. They performed together on a handful of
occasions since then.